Category Archives: Ausstellungen

Roots_Heimat: Wie offen ist der Jazz?

The 17th Darmstadt Jazzforum which will take place from September 30 through October 2, 2021, asks about the sometimes unclear relationship between “roots” and “Heimat”, the loaded German word signifying “home”,  “home country”, “home culture” and much more. Roots stands for the African-American origin of jazz that resonates even in the most advanced experiments of contemporary improvisation. Heimat stands for the fact that jazz in particular always demands a cultural and aesthetic self-localization. For some, jazz is a creative practice used globally, but always pointing back to its African-American origins. For others, jazz is something they grew up with, something that allows them to express their own concerns and individual point of view better than most other genres. For many, jazz is both, containing the African-American tradition just as much as the productive freedom to apply this practice outside of its original community connecedness.

All of that is what we want to talk about. We plan to continue discussions prompted by the Black Lives Matter movement about the idea of “Europe” which had a lasting influence on aesthetics and ethics, the presentation and the reception of jazz. We ask how a possibly Eurocentric perspective has changed and continues to shape our perception of what jazz stands for, how it connects both to the music’s African American origins and to our own individual cultural environment. Our discussions may start with the name “jazz”, we may look at historical examples of Eurocentric tendencies, and we may take into account the current discourse about the relevance of jazz in non-African American communities. We will talk about racism in jazz, reflect on how exclusion and different forms of othering are present in today’s jazz scene, and look at alternate readings of how the example of African American culture has changed and enriched the understanding of music all over the world. We won’t limit the discussion to jazz but also look at similar debates about Eurocentrism or African-Americanism in contemporary composed music or pop culture.

The Darmstadt Jazzforum is an international conference aimed at a more general than just the scholarly community. We expect papers that spur on discussions beyond the limits of jazz research, and we expect an audience of musicians, journalists, dedicated jazz fans as much as students and scholars from different fields.


Das Darmstädter Jazzforum online

Thursday, 30 September 2021

Friday, 1. October 2021

Saturday, 2 October 2021

Concert, Luise Volkmann + LEONEsauvage

 


The Jazzinstitut Darmstadt organizes the Darmstadt Jazzforum with the support of the City of Sciences Darmstadt. In 2021 it is held in co-operation with HoffART-Theater Darmstadt and the Bessunger Knabenschule. The 17th Darmstadt Jazzforum is funded by the Kulturfonds FrankfurtRhein-Main and by the Hessian Ministery for the Sciences and the Arts. It is presented by Jazzthetik – Zeitschrift für Jazz und anderes.


Summery of the program:

Thursday, 30 September 2021, from 2:00pm

How is cultural identity formed and how is its perception influenced?
On the first day of the 17th Darmstadt Jazzforum conference we will ask how cultural identity is expressed in music or how it is perceived or not perceived in music. Philipp Teriete will talk about the educational canon at Historically Black Colleges and Universities in the USA in the late 19th and early 20th century and discuss the influence of this kind of music education on early jazz. Anna-Lisa Malmros discusses the very different identities of Danish-Congolese saxophonist John Tchicai, who has also been identified with the U.S. free jazz scene at least since his participation in some of its most prominent recordings in the 1960s. The following conversation with saxophonist Gabriele Maurer, double bassist Reza Askari, and vocalist Simin Tander [t.b.c.] will also discuss issues of identity, namely present the very personal experiences of artists who have been affected in different ways, by skin color, family background, and/or their artistic engagement with traditions that lie outside their German homeland (moderated by Sophie Emilie Beha). We have titled this panel: “About being a stranger, arriving, yet staying a stranger. Conversation about one’s own experience of identity perception”.


Friday, 1 October 2021, from 09:30am

Cultural appropriation and national self-image (case studies)
In the morning session of the second conference day we will talk about the often very personal process of appropriation of African-American music in Europe. Philipp Schmickl will present the example of the Austrian Hans Falb, who met African-American trumpeter Clifford Thornton in Paris in 1978 and then planned concerts for and with Thornton in his hometown in eastern Austria, which eventually resulted in an internationally acclaimed festival. He questions the motivations behind Falb’s curatorial activity and relates them to Thornton’s views on music and politics of the time. Ádám Havas refers to a 2002 statement by Bruce Johnson (“Jazz was not simply ‘invented’ and then exported. It was invented in the process of its own dissemination”) and applies it to the reception of jazz in Hungary, which has been very consciously drawing on cultural practices of Roma musicians living in Hungary. Finally, Niklaus Troxler, whose posters are the subject of a special exhibition at the Jazzinstitut, will talk about his own path to jazz, as a fan, as the founder and longtime organizer of the Willisau Jazz Festival, with which he was able to bring many of the musicians to Switzerland whose music he adored, and as an internationally renowned graphic artist.

Friday, 1 October 2021, from 2:00pm

“Us” and “the others”
The much-postulated “emancipation” of European jazz in the 1950s and 1960s from U.S. (and thus especially African-American) models often led to an attitude of “we have to do something of our own,” which – mostly unconsciously rather than consciously – led to the perception that jazz produced by European musicians had become something quite different from what was happening in the United States. Harald Kisiedu questions these perceptions, discusses the important Afro-Diasporic contributions to European experimental jazz and the admiration of African-American heroes that has always existed in the jazz scene, as examples for cultural creolization. Timo Vollbrecht has long been active as a saxophonist on the New York music scene, and also tours Germany and Europe with different bands. He has asked fellow musicians about their experiences with “social othering” and the exoticization of their person/art/music and, based on this, discusses possible strategies for each artist to achieve social justice in the music community. Trumpeter Stephan Meinberg asks about how to deal with one’s own privileges as a person perceived as “white” who as a professional, e.g. practicing musician furthermore works mostly with African-American music. In a roundtable with guitarist Jean-Paul Bourelly, concert promoter Kornelia Vossebein and cultural activists Joana Tischkau and Frieder Blume, we will finally discuss what is needed to contribute not only to a change in consciousness, but also to a different representation of musicians on stage (moderator: Sophie Emilie Beha). We have optimistically titled this panel: “Get to work: change reality!!!”


Saturday, 2 October 2021, from 09:30am

Of folks and people (case studies)
Identity is on the one hand something very personal, but on the other hand it is often perceived differently from the outside than by oneself. This is the subject of the morning session of the third conference day, which collects some very specific, yet quite different examples . Nico Thom talks about Bill Ramsey, the white U.S. American who (in addition to a career in German “Schlager”) was celebrated in the German jazz scene of the 1950s as the “man with the black voice”, discussing aspects of the “Americanization of Europe, in which ‘postwar Western European societies actively participated in Americanization with strategic self-interests and skillful appropriation strategies.'” Focusing on a concert at Deutsches Jazz Festival in 1978, in which saxophonist Heinz Sauer shared the stage with Archie Shepp and George Adams, Peter Kemper examines the developmental of both Shepp’s and Sauer’s musical approaches and asks about aesthetic qualities of jazz that may transcend ethnic, geographical and national identities. Like an introduction to the afternoon session, Vincent Bababoutilabo emphasizes the need for perspectives critical of racism in music education today and in this country (Germany).

Saturday, 2 October 2021, from 02:00pm

How we view the world
Each of us is responsible for our own perspective. Perspectives, however, are not a default, they can be changed. The last afternoon of the Jazzforum is about such changes of perspective. We start the afternoon with a presentation by Berlin-based musicians Sanni Lötzsch and Jo Wespel. They will introduce their concept FESTIVAL BOOST NOW!, which is meant to be a call for self-empowerment of musicians on the one hand and for the creation of “fundamental openness” within all culture communities on the other. Their radical concept demands an approach towards queerfeminist, intersectional, anti-rassist, and interdisciplinary teamwork  within the artistic process, as well as the re-formation of cultural structures. With their “Meta-Community” they not only develop multiperspective event formats, but also create holistic “Realutopien” (real world utopias), as they call it. Saxophonist Luise Volkmann received the Kathrin-Preis awarded by the Jazzinstitut in April 2021, which came with a week-long residency in Darmstadt, during which she conducted research on Sun Ra, the African diaspora, the Black Atlantic, the socio-musical and political influence of music. At the same time, she met for the first time with the musicians of her latest LEONEsauvage band, which will be heard on Friday evening at the Darmstadt Jazzforum, and discussed with them subjects such as the African-American diaspora and how we as Europeans deal with it. In her own contribution and then in conversation with singer-songwriter Ella O’Brien-Coker, Volkmann will discuss aspects of rituality, our many identities and performative speech. In the concluding panel, we ask what influence our own and others’ views have on our dialogue with “the world”. We have invited Constanze Schliebs, who has many years of experience as a booking agent in Germany and abroad and has also been active as a curator and festival founder in China, Sophie-Therese Hueber from the music department of the Goethe-Institut, and Sylvia Freydank from Internationales Musikinstitut Darmstadt (Summer Courses for New Music), institutions where similar discussions have been going on for some time (moderator: Sophie Emilie Beha). And we ask somewhat provocatively, “Do we actually just export music or also our worldview?”


Concert:
On Friday evening, 1 October 2021, Luise Volkmann and LEONE sauvage at Bessunger Knabenschule. (more…)


Exhibition:
From 4 October 2021 the gallery of the Jazzinstitut shows the exhibition “Jazz Stories in Red and Blue” with posters created by Swiss artist and jazz promoter Niklaus Troxler. Some posters will be shown at the conference venue during the Jazzforum. (more…)

If you have any further questions, fee free to write us at jazz@jazzinstitut.de


Das 17. Darmstädter Jazzforum wird gefördert von 

POSITIONEN! Jazz und Politik

Jazz was often seen as a music of resistance, however with its increasing institutionalization some of this political awareness seems to have vanished. It feels as if musicians are more interested in tackling the technical and aesthetic sides of the music while the audience sits back and compares what it hears with what it knows instead of focusing on the unknown, unexpected and perhaps a bit more complex gaze ahead.

Thus, while in the United States, the birthplace of Jazz, many current projects, be it by Vijay Iyer or Kamasi Washington, sport a political note, musicians in Europe seem to be content with jazz being appreciated as art music. However, at a time when all over Europe the social and political achievements of the past decades are being pushed back by new populist movements, all forms of art must face questions of social responsibility again, whether it’s a more conscious position towards climate change, poverty, education, and a global understanding of humanity, whether it’s advocating human dignity on all levels, or taking a clear stance against sexism, racism and any other kind of exclusion: “Diversity”, says Kamasi Washington, “should not be tolerated, it should be celebrated.”

Where, then, do we find such celebration of diversity within contemporary European jazz? How strong is the awareness of musicians for their own political and social responsibility? And why is it that in jazz, the genre with the deepest history of resistance, singing of political justice seems to be looked down upon?

At the 16th Darmstadt Jazzforum we want to ask such questions, in papers, panels, concert lectures, a workshop, an exhibition as well as an ensuing book documentation. We do not think that jazz needs to be converted. Not everything has to be political first. However, as everything will have a political aspect in 2019 as well, we want to talk to musicians, experts, scholars and others about why jazz with its ever-present history of resistance, with improvisation’s seismographic ability to capture present-time discourses, should take a first seat within the canon of contemporary music.

The conference part of the Darmstadt Jazzforum will take place from 3-6 October 2019 at Literaturhaus Darmstadt. It will be flanked by concerts, an exhibition and workshops at other venues and thus involve the whole city in our discourse about the political in jazz.

[to be continued soon]

The 16th Darmstadt Jazzforum is funded by the Hessen State Ministry for Higher Education, Research and the Arts and the City of Darmstadt – City of Science and Culture

[The rest of this page is in German as that will also be the language of the conference.]

— — —

Programm (Stand: 29. Juli 2019)
“POSITIONEN! Jazz und Politik”

Donnerstag, 3. Oktober 2019

AUSSTELLUNG (ab 3. Oktober)

Vortragssaal im Literaturhaus + Galerie im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt

Alles wird gut gegangen sein werden – die Ausstellung

Im Künstlerkollektiv BRIGADE FUTUR III haben sich Benjamin Weidekamp, Elia Rediger, Jérôme Bugnon und Michael Haves zusammengetan, um zu Fragen und Herausforderungen unserer Zeit künstlerisch Stellung zu beziehen. Dabei reflektieren sie nichts Geringeres als den Zustand der Welt, die Auswüchse des Kapitalismus und vor allem auch die Möglichkeiten jedes einzelnen, sich in den Diskurs einzubringen.

Als Musiker transportieren sie ihr politisches Statement im Sinne von Brecht und Weill in vielen Konzerten und Bühnenprojekten, oft zusammen mit anderen Musikern und Künstlern wie der Spielvereinigung Sued aus Leipzig.

Auf Einladung des Jazzinstituts Darmstadt hat sich die BRIGADE FUTUR III der Aufgabe gestellt, ihre Ideen im Rahmen dieser Ausstellung für das 16. Darmstädter Jazzforum “Jazz und Politik” umzusetzen.

Alles wird gut gegangen sein werden… aber wie nur? Wie kann man für ein positives Zukunftsbild einstehen, dessen Voraussetzungen in der Zukunft erst “geschaffen zu sein werden haben?” Die Idee des fiktionalen Futur III war geboren, mit dem die Künstler einen kategorischen Handlungsimperativ verbinden, um ein positives gesellschaftliches Narrativ zu entwerfen, für das es sich zu leben lohnt.

Auf der Basis ihres “Kampfalphabets”, in dem Schrecken unseres gesellschaftlichen Systems mit Alternativen kontrastiert werden, verfolgen sie ihren konzeptionellen Kunstansatz mit Sendungsbewusstsein.

“Die verheerenden Auswirkungen des Raubtierkapitalismus auf die Welt werden immer deutlicher und es ist klar, dass es so nicht mehr weiter gehen kann.” BRIGADE FUTUR III

(wegen der Konferenz im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt öffentlich erst ab 7.10. zu sehen) 


KONFERENZ (Literaturhaus)

14:00 Uhr
Eröffnung

14:15 Uhr
Stephan Braese, Aachen
Stammheim war nie Attica. Zur politischen Widerständigkeit des Jazz in Deutschland seit 1945

Ungeachtet des eminenten Einflusses, den die US-amerikanischen Entwicklungen stets hatten, standen die Entfaltung, aber auch die politischen Wirkungschancen des Jazz in Deutschland stets unter spezifischen Bedingungen. Ausgehend von der (Wieder-)Einführung des Jazz 1945, skizziert der Vortrag einige dieser Bedingungen, zu denen die ethnische Homogenität der deutschen Bevölkerung, der Kampf um die Legitimität des Jazz, ein spezifisch europäischer Kunstbegriff, die (west-)deutsche Interpretation der antiautoritären Bewegung 1966 ff. u.a. gehören. Die Ausführungen stellen die Frage danach, ob und inwieweit diese in den Gründungsjahrzehnten des deutschen Jazz angelegten Dispositive auch im heutigen Verhältnis zwischen Jazz und Politik noch zu erkennen und wirksam sind.

Stephan Braese (geb. 1961) studierte Germanistik, Geschichte und Erziehungswissenschaft in Hamburg. Seit 2009 ist er Ludwig Strauss-Professor für europäisch-jüdische Literatur- und Kulturgeschichte an der RWTH Aachen University. Einschlägige Veröffentlichungen u.a.: “Identifying the Impulse: Alfred Lion Founds the Blue Note Jazz Label”, in Eckart Goebel and Sigrid Weigel (ed.): “Escape to Life” – German Intellectuals in New York: A Compendium of Exile after 1933 (Berlin/ Boston: de Gruyter, 2013): 270-287; “‘kenny clarke im club st-germain-des-prés’ – Zu einem Satz von Alfred Andersch”, in Corina Caduff, Anne-Kathrin-Reulecke, Ulrike Vedder (ed.): Passionen – Objekte/ Schauplätze/ Denkstile (München: Wilhelm Fink 2010): 309-316.

15:15 Uhr

Henning Vetter, Osnabrück
Jazz als politische Musik? Über die Selbstbestimmung des Künstlers über die Rezeption und Deutungshoheit seines Werkes

Spricht man über Politik in Verbindung mit Jazz, so impliziert diese Zusammenführung eine Positionierung des Künstlers und des Publikums gleichermaßen. Doch wie kann eine an sich abstrakte Musik Haltung zeigen, Aussagen treffen? Und: welche Aussagen kann sie überhaupt treffen? Der Vortrag nähert sich diesen Fragestellungen von einer praktischen Seite am Beispiel des Kollektivs “The Dorf”. Dabei geht es auch darum, wer bestimmt, wie die Musik aufgenommen wird und ob die Intention des Künstlers bezüglich der Bedeutung seines eigenen Werkes nicht sogar überflüssig sein kann.

Henning Vetter studierte Musikwissenschaft und Medienkulturwissenschaft an der Universität zu Köln. Seine Abschlussarbeit widmete er dem Bassisten Charles Mingus im Hinblick auf die politische Wirkung dessen musikalischen Werkes. Von 2017 bis 2019 studierte Henning Vetter am Institut für Musik der Hochschule Osnabrück Saxophon und gründete vor drei Jahren gemeinsam mit Freunden in Köln das PAO-Kollektiv für experimentelle und improvisierte Musik.

16:15 Uhr
Nina Polaschegg, Wien
Sind frei Improvisierende die besseren Demokraten?

Gerne werden Jazz und frei improvisierte Musik als demokratisches Gesellschaftsmodell einem hierarchisch aufgebauten Orchesterapparat gegenüber gestellt. Und ein Streichquartett, wo stünde dann dieses? Ob und wieweit solche Modelle tragfähig sind und inwieweit hier Wunsch und Wirklichkeit auseinander klaffen ist eine der Fragen, denen in diesem Vortrag nachgegangen wird. Um in einem Zeitraffer und knappen Rückblick in die Anfänge des Free Jazz politisch motivierte freie Musik im Hier & Jetzt zu beleuchten und dabei auch einen Blick in die Welt der komponierten zeitgenössischen Musik zu werfen. 

Nina Polaschegg studierte Musikwissenschaften, Soziologie und Philosophie in Giessen und Hamburg wo sie auch promovierte. Ihre Forschungsschwerpunkte liegen im Bereich der zeitgenössischen komponierten, improvisierten und elektronischen Musik sowie im zeitgenössischen Jazz und Musiksoziologie. Sie lebt als Musikwissenschaftlerin, Musikpublizistin, Moderatorin und Kontrabassistin in Wien, arbeitet für diverse öffentlich-rechtliche Rundfunkanstalten in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz und schreibt für verschiedene Fachzeitschriften. Hatte Lehraufträge an den Musikhochschulen bzw. Universitäten Hamburg und Klagenfurt. Als Kontrabassistin spielte sie historisch informiert in  Barockorchestern und widmet sich v.a. der (freien) Improvisation.

17:15 (bis 17:45) Uhr
Benjamin Weidekamp + Michael Haves, Berlin
Alles wird gut gegangen sein werden – Der Talk

Benjamin Weidekamp und Michael Alves sind Mitglieder der  Brigade Futur III, die beim Darmstädter Jazzforum nicht nur musikalisch aktiv werden (zusammen mit der Spielvereinigung Sued am Samstagabend), sondern auch eine Ausstellung in den Räumen des Jazzinstituts und des Literaturhauses Darmstadt zeigen, in der sie den künstlerischen Prozess ihrer kreativen (und immer auch politischen / gesellschaftlichen) Arbeit beleuchten. Darum geht es auch bei ihrem gemeinsamen Vortrag im Konferenzteil des Jazzforums, in dem sie über die Diskussionen um ihre Darmstädter Beiträge berichten werden.

— — —

Freitag, 4. Oktober 2019

AUSSTELLUNG (ab 3. Oktober)

Vortragssaal im Literaturhaus + Galerie im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt
Alles wird gut gegangen sein werden – die Ausstellung
(wegen der Konferenz im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt öffentlich erst ab 7.10. zu sehen)

KONFERENZ (Literaturhaus)

9:30 Uhr
Wolfram Knauer, Darmstadt
Jazz und Politik – politischer Jazz? Eine bundesdeutsche Perspektive

Wer in diesen Zeiten nicht politisch denkt und handelt, hat ein Problem: Die Krisen, von denen wir von allen Seiten bedrängt werden, fordern doch nachgerade Position zu beziehen. Anhand konkreter Beispiele diskutiert Wolfram Knauer die durchaus unterschiedlichen Erwartungshaltungen an die gesellschaftliche Relevanz von Musik. So fragt er beispielsweise, inwieweit wir uns nicht selbst belügen, wenn wir der Musik außermusikalische Kompetenz zusprechen und sie nach dieser bemessen. Zugleich hinterfragt er aber auch, inwieweit Musik unpolitisch sein kann oder sollte. Tun wir Musik nicht unrecht, wenn wir in ihr die Utopie suchen, die uns in unserem eigenen Handeln fehlt?

Wolfram Knauer ist Musikwissenschaftler und seit seiner Gründung Direktor des Jazzinstituts Darmstadt. Er lehrte an mehreren Universitäten und war als erster Nichtamerikaner Louis Armstrong Professor of Jazz Studies an der Columbia University. Er ist Herausgeber der Darmstädter Beiträge zur Jazzforschung und Autor zahlreicher wissenschaftlicher Beiträge in Büchern und Fachzeitschriften. Bei Reclam erschienen seine Bücher Louis Armstrong (2010), Charlie Parker (2014) und Duke Ellington (2017) sowie jüngst “Play yourself, man!” Die Geschichte des Jazz in Deutschland (2019).

Mario Dunkel, Oldenburg
Afrodiasporische Musik und Populismus in Europa

Dass populäre Musik und Jazz der Verhandlung von Identitätskonzepten dienen, ist keine neue Erkenntnis. Kategorien wie Nation, race, Ethnizität, Gender und Klasse sind seit den Anfängen des Jazz wichtige Diskursfelder, in denen die Musik verortet und verstanden wird. Die Beziehung zwischen Gruppenidentität und Musik ist insbesondere in der Interaktion zwischen aktueller populärer Musik und zeitgenössischen politischen Bewegungen signifikant. So greift die Alternative für Deutschland (AfD) auf Demonstrationen beispielsweise nicht nur auf deutschsprachige Volksmusik und Richard Wagners Walkürenritt zurück, sondern sie setzt auch populäre Musik mit eindeutigen afrodiasporischen Bezügen ein, wenn etwa Xavier Naidoos “Raus aus dem Reichstag” eine Demonstration gegen den Bau einer Moschee in Rostock musikalisch begleitet. Dieser Beitrag geht solchen Aneignungsstrategien von afrodiasporischen Musiken in gegenwärtigen politischen Bewegungen nach. Welche Funktion hat die Verwendung afrodiasporischer Musiken in diesen politischen Bewegungen in Europa? Warum wird die Verwendung afrodiasporischer Musiken in diesen Zusammenhängen nicht als widersprüchlich empfunden, wo sie doch die Forderung nach kultureller Homogenität zu karikieren scheint? Inwiefern kann die Aneignung afrodiasporischer Musiken als Bestandteil aktueller Identitätspolitiken in Europa verstanden werden?

Mario Dunkel studierte in Dortmund, Atlanta und New York Musik, Englisch und Amerikanistik. 2014 promovierte er mit einer Dissertation zu Darstellungen von Jazzgeschichte an der TU Dortmund. Er ist zurzeit Juniorprofessor für Musikpädagogik am Institut für Musik der Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg. Zu seinen Forschungsschwerpunkten zählen Konstruktionen und Darstellungen von Jazzgeschichte, Musik und Politik sowie transkulturelle Musikpädagogik. Zurzeit leitet er das internationale Forschungsprojekt „Popular Music and the Rise of Populism in Europe“ (2019-2022).

11:30 Uhr
Martin Pfleiderer, Weimar
“… an outstanding artistic model of democratic cooperation”? Zur Interaktion im Jazz

Glaubt man der Resolution des US-Kongresses aus dem Jahre 1987, so ist Jazz ein herausragendes künstlerisches Modell demokratischer Kooperation. Denn im Jazz, so die verbreitete Vorstellung, halten sich Gruppeninteraktion und individueller Ausdruck die Waage, und in seinen klanglichen Strukturen lassen sich die Prozesse gleichberechtigter Interaktion und Kooperation auch für Außenstehende nachvollziehen. Diese Vorstellungen sollen im Vortrag kritisch hinterfragt werden. Wie geht der interaktive Schaffensprozess im Jazz tatsächlich vonstatten? Welchen Stellenwert haben dabei einerseits körperliche Synchronisierungsprozesse zwischen den MusikerInnen, andererseits explizite Signale und Absprachen? Wird eine gleichberechtigte Interaktion nur inszeniert und auf der Bühne dargestellt, oder ist sie real und hat reale Konsequenzen? Welche Rolle spielen hierarchische Strukturen, Führerschaft und Autorität innerhalb von Jazzbands? Kann schon allein im Prozess des interaktiv-improvisatorischen Musikmachens ein politischer oder sogar utopischer Gehalt aufscheinen oder sind dafür zusätzlich bestimmte Symbole oder Musiker-Statements erforderlich? Neben musiksoziologischen und musikanalytischen Zugängen sollen zur Klärung dieser Fragen auch neuere Ansätze der ›embodied music interaction‹ und der Diskussion um musikalische ›agency‹ herangezogen werden.

Martin Pfleiderer (Jg. 1967) studierte Musikwissenschaft, Philosophie und Soziologie in Gießen und war 1999-2005 wissenschaftlicher Assistent für Systematische Musikwissenschaft an der Uni Hamburg. Seit 2009 ist er Professor für Geschichte des Jazz und der populären Musik am Institut für Musikwissenschaft Weimar-Jena. Er hat zahlreiche Aufsätze zum Jazz veröffentlicht und ist darüber hinaus leidenschaftlicher Jazzsaxophonist.

14:00 Uhr
Panel mit Nadin Deventer, Berlin | Tina Heine, Salzburg | Lena Jeckel, Gütersloh | Ulrich Stock, Hamburg
Veranstalter/innen: die Influencer des Jazz?

In diesem Panel wollen wir über die Strukturzwänge sprechen, in denen insbesondere große Jazzevents organisiert und wahrgenommen werden. Welche Aufgabe haben Kurator/innen über das reine Programmieren hinaus? Wie können Festivals oder Konzertreihen nachhaltig wirken, eine regionale Szene einbinden und zugleich im internationalen Diskurs des Jazz wahrgenommen werden? Welche Auswirkungen haben programmatische Entscheidungen auf die Diskussion innerhalb der gesamten bundesdeutschen Szene? Oder, und damit deutlicher auf unser Konferenzthema bezogen: Wie gehen Programmverantwortliche auf gesellschafts- und kulturpolitische Diskurse ein? Wollen sie das überhaupt oder müssen sie gegebenenfalls auf gesamtgesellschaftlich diskutierte Themen reagieren? Wie schließlich spiegeln sich ihre Programmentscheidungen in der öffentlichen Wahrnehmung wieder? Mit Tina Heine, Lena Jeckel und Nadin Deventer haben wir drei Programmverantwortliche auf dem Podium, die aus eigener Erfahrung über das Machbare genauso wie über das Wünschenswerte berichten können. Mit Ulrich Stock ist zudem ein Journalist dabei, der immer wieder über die Reaktion der Jazzszene auf aktuelle Fragen berichtet und die verschiedenen Orte erkundet, an denen diese gesellschaftlich-musikalische Auseinandersetzung zu erleben ist.

15:30 Uhr
Nikolaus Neuser + Florian Juncker, Berlin
“Occupied Reading”: Musikalische Intervention

Wie verändert die Lektüre politischer, ästhetischer oder sonstiger Texte die Wahrnehmung von Musik? Wie verändert Musik die Lektüre politischer, ästhetischer oder anderer Texte? Nikolaus Neuser und Florian Juncker machen die Probe aufs Exempel, und wir erfahren: Musik verändert das Denken, aber das Denken verändert auch die musikalische Wahrnehmung. Welchen Diskurs lassen solche intermedialen Erfahrungen entstehen? Und was lehren sie uns letzten Endes über den tatsächlichen Einfluss von Musik (oder Kunst im Allgemeinen) auf unser gesellschaftliches Denken und Handeln?

16:00 Uhr
Hans Lüdemann
“Beyond the underdog”. Gesellschaftliche und politische Positionierung eines deutschen Jazzmusikers heute (Vortrag live am Klavier / Lecture-Performance)

Hans Lüdemann erzählt, warum die politische Einstellung für ihn eine der wichtigen Motivationen war, überhaupt Jazzmusiker zu werden. Er fragt, welche Bedeutung eine politische Haltung in Bezug auf den Jazz heute hat, wie und worin sie sich ausdrücken kann. Am Klavier erklingen politisch gefärbte und gedeutete Musikstücke und es wird den Widersprüchen nachgespürt, die sich zwischen politischer Haltung und Botschaft einerseits und der abstrakten Welt der Töne andererseits auftun können. Aber auch die Positionierung und Behauptung des Musikers in der gesellschaftlichen Realität zwischen Kunst, Kommerz, Kulturförderung und Kapitalismus wird dabei mit ins Bild gerückt.

Hans Lüdemann ist Jazzpianist und Komponist. Er hat mit deutschen und internationalen Größen zusammengearbeitet wie Eberhard Weber, Heinz Sauer, Manfred Schoof, Angelika Niescier, Jan Garbarek und Paul Bley. Im Zentrum seiner Arbeit stehen jedoch eigene Projekte: er spielt Solokonzerte, zuletzt 2018 in China, im Trio ROOMS, arbeitet seit 20 Jahren mit dem afrikanischen Balaphon-Meister Aly Keita im TRIO IVOIRE zusammen und leitet das deutsch-französische Oktett „TransEuropeExpress“. Er erweitert das Klavier mit Samples in mikrotonale Bereiche, was in dem neuen Quartett mikroPULS mit Gebhard Ullmann, Oliver Potratz und Eric Schaefer besonders zur Geltung kommt. Hans Lüdemann hat über 30 Alben bei renommierten Labels veröffentlicht. Seine bisher umfangreichste Produktion, die CD – Box„die kunst des trios“, wurde 2013 mit dem „Echo Jazz“ ausgezeichnet. Lüdemann war von 1993 – 2008 Dozent für Jazz-Klavier und – Ensemble an der Musikhochschule Köln, 2009/2010 und 2015/16 Cornell Visiting Professor am Swarthmore College in Philadelphia/USA.

KONZERT (Centralstation Darmstadt)
20:00 Uhr

Anarchist Republic of Bzzz (FR/NL/TR/USA)

Seb El Zin, in Paris lebender Sänger der Ethno-Punk-Band ITHAK, gründete diese etwas andere Supergroup – musikalisch zwischen Impro-Avantgarde, Worldmusic und Slampoetry. Mehr Informationen zum Konzert

Das Konzert wird präsentiert von

Collage: Kiki Picasso©

— — —

Samstag, 5. Oktober 2019

AUSSTELLUNG (ab 3. Oktober)

Vortragssaal im Literaturhaus + Galerie im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt
Alles wird gut gegangen sein werden – die Ausstellung
(wegen der Konferenz im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt öffentlich erst ab 7.10. zu sehen)

KONFERENZ (Literaturhaus)

9:30 Uhr
Nikolaus Neuser, Berlin
Jazz und improvisierte Musik als soziales Rollenmodell?

Wir sind heute täglich in immer komplexere Zusammenhänge eingebunden, auf die wir in immer schnelleren Rückkopplungen reagieren müssen. Durch die Digitalisierung befinden wir uns sowohl technologisch als auch in unserer Kommunikation und Diskursfähigkeit in erheblichen Umbrüchen. Welche Kompetenzen und Modelle zukünftigen Miteinanders liefert uns die Kulturtechnik der Improvisation vor diesem Hintergrund? Nikolaus Neuser beleuchtet diese Fragestellung auch aus der konkreten Perspektive seiner kulturpolitischen Arbeit.

Nikolaus Neuser studierte an der Folkwang-Hochschule in Essen Trompete bei Uli Beckerhoff. Aktuell interpretiert er mit dem Trio I Am Three unkonventionell  besetzt die Musik von Charles Mingus. 2016 legte das Trio das international vielbeachtete Album Mingus Mingus Mingus (Leo Records) vor (Jahresbestenliste Downbeat Magazin, All about Jazz, NYC Jazz Records uva.). Er arbeitet außerdem im Trio mit Richard Scott und Alexander Frangenheim an elekroakkustischer improvisierter Musik und ist u.a. Mitglied der Ensembles Potsa Lotsa, Andreas Willers´ 7 of 8, des Hannes Zerbe Jazz Orchesters und des Berlin Improvisers Orchestra. Nikolaus Neuser hat mit Matthew Herbert, Matana Roberts, Tyshawn Sorey, Nate Wooley, Maggie Nicols, Peter Fox, Seeed sowie dem London Improvisers Orchestra u.v.a gearbeitet und ist auf über 50 CDs zu hören. Konzertreisen u.a. auf Einladung des Goethe Instituts führten ihn durch Europa, Asien, Nordafrika, die USA, in den Libanon, Jordanien, Saudi-Arabien sowie nach Kolumbien, wo er als Gastprofessor an der Pontificia Universidad Javeriana de Bogotá lehrte.

10:30 Uhr
Michael Rüsenberg, Köln
“Jazz ist stets politisch.” Stimmt diese Aussage von Mark Turner? Und, hört man sie in seiner Musik?

Im November 2016 (Donald Trump ist gerade gewählt), vermutet der amerikanische Saxophonist Mark Turner im Gespräch mit der NZZ, “dass es wieder zu einer Politisierung der Kunst kommen wird.” Das ist eine Überzeugung, die wie unter einem Brennglas den zentralen Inhalt des Politikverständisses weiter Teile der Jazzszene wiedergibt (s. Titel). “Allein schon der Entscheid, als Jazzmusiker zu leben, ist ein politisches Statement. Denn man entscheidet sich damit für Freiheit, für Emanzipation und gegen den Primat des materiellen Erfolgs” (Turner). Michael Rüsenberg unterzieht diese Position einer grundsätzlichen Kritik.

Michael Rüsenberg, geb 1948, Journalist, Buchautor, Gastgeber der philosophischen Gesprächsreihe “Gedankensprünge” in Bann. Adolf-Grimme-Preis 1989, WDR Jazzpreis 2015. Buchprojekt “Improvisation – ein Prinzip des Lebens” (in Vorbereitung)

11:30 Uhr
Thomas Krüger, Berlin

Der Beitrag von Kunst und Kultur, insbesondere des Jazz, für aktuelle gesellschaftspolitische Diskurse

In meinem Beitrag würde ich zunächst auf die Debatte um die Kulturalisierung des Politischen eingehen und aktuelle Tendenzen politischer Verschiebungen aufzeigen. Ich werde die kreative wie auch die rezeptive Seite von kulturellen Artefakten beleuchten und nach dem Politischen in der Ästhetik fragen. Und danach, was der Jazz, insbesondere der frei improvisierende Jazz in diesem Zusammenhang für ein Potential hat.

Thomas Krüger ist seit 2000 Präsident der Bundeszentrale für politischen Bildung. Seit 1995 ist er Präsident des Deutschen Kinderhilfswerkes. Außerdem ist er zweiter stellvertretender Vorsitzender der Kommission für Jugendmedienschutz und Mitglied des Kuratoriums für den Geschichtswettbewerb des Bundespräsidenten. 1991 bis 1994 war er Senator für Jugend und Familie in Berlin, 1994 bis 1998 Mitglied des Deutschen Bundestages.

14:00 Uhr
Angelika Niescier + Tim Isfort + Victoriah Szirmai + Korhan Erel
… im Ohr des Betrachters
(Lecture-Performance)

Der Ton: ein physikalisches Ereignis, ohne ästhetische noch politische Intention.
In der Wahrnehmung der Rezipienten wird „der Ton“ aber sofort kontextualisiert – eine essentielle Projektionsfläche für tatsächliche und irreale Intentionen, Botschaften und Diskursangebote. In dieser Lecture Performance mit Musiker*innen, Kurator*innen und Jornalist*innen werden unterschiedliche  Perspektiven des Themenclusters untersucht, um Überschneidungen, Unterschiede und mögliche Kontroversen zu verdeutlichen und um sich in der Diskussion dem Intendierten, Verstandenen und Missverstandenen und dem Phänomen des “Politischen” in der Musik zu nähern.

16:30 Uhr (programmkinorex Darmstadt)
Atef Ben Bouzid, Berlin

Cairo Jazzman – The Groove of a Megacity

“Jazz is more than just a style of music”, sagt Amr Salah. “It’s about freedom.” Salah, ägyptischer Pianist und Komponist, kämpft seit 2009 jedes Jahr darum, das Cairo Jazz Festival zu realisieren. Jazz ist zu seinem Lebensinhalt geworden, weil diese Musik in seinen Augen völkerverbindend ist und speziell der Jugend ein Sprachrohr gibt. Für Amr Salah handelt es sich um einen vielfältigen Musikstil, der damit auch für Liberalität und Offenheit einer Gesellschaft steht, für die es sich zu kämpfen lohnt. Atif Ben Bouzids Film über das Cairo Jazz Festival gibt ungewohnte und vielschichtige Einblicke in das Leben der Zivilgesellschaft in der Megacity Kairo, eingebettet im Jazz als einer universellen, völkerverbindenden und horizonterweiternden Sprache.
Mehr Informationen zum Film

Nach der Filmvorführung gibt es ein Filmgespräch mit dem Regisseur über Jazz und zivilgesellschaftlicher Aktivismus in der arabischen Welt.

Atef Ben Bouzid ist ein deutscher Journalist, Regisseur und Produzent aus Berlin mit dem Fokus auf Sport, Musik und Gesellschaft. “Cairo Jazzman” ist sein Regiedebüt. “Cairo Jazzman” feierte die Weltpremiere beim International Film Festival Rotterdam 2017.

KONZERT (Kulturzentrum Bessunger Knabenschule)
20:00 Uhr

Brigade Futur III + Spielvereinigung Sued
Alles wird gut gegangen sein werden – Das Konzert

Nicht nur grammatikalische Formen lassen sich fiktiv erweitern, sondern auch fiktionale politische Programmatiken in musikalische Spielformen transferieren. Das zumindest beweist die Berliner Brigade Futur 3. Mehr Informationen zum Konzert

Das Konzert wird präsentiert von

Foto: Ebasi Rediger©

— — —

ab Montag, 7. Oktober 2019

AUSSTELLUNG (ab 3. Oktober)

Vortragssaal im Literaturhaus + Galerie im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt
Alles wird gut gegangen sein werden – die Ausstellung
(wegen der Konferenz im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt öffentlich erst ab 7.10. zu sehen)

— — —

Das 16. Darmstädter Jazzforum wird gefördert vom Hessischen Ministerium für Wissenschaft und Kunst, den Kulturfonds Frankfurt RheinMain und der Wissenschaftsstadt Darmstadt. Wir danken für die freundliche Unterstützung durch die Sparkasse Darmstadt.

 

 

15th Darmstadt Jazzforum

Jazz @ 100 | An alternative to a story of heroes

Conference, Concerts, exhibition, 28 – 30 September 2017

Details about the conference “Jazz @ 100 | An alternative to a story of heroes”
Details about the concert with the Kirk Lightsey Quintet feat. Paul Zauner
Details about the concert with the Julia Hülsmann Octet

Details about the concert with Orrin Evans
Details about the exhibition “My Encounters with ‘American Jazz Heroes'”

In the centenary of jazz ­– the recordings of the Original Dixieland Jass Band from 1917 are often cited as the first jazz recordings ever – the Darmstadt Jazzforum conference looks at the pitfalls of jazz historiography, which often relies on myths and legends that distort what is even more important: the multi-perspectivity of a music which is being created not only by great masters, but certainly by many individualists.

In all of this, the 15th Darmstadt Jazzforum does not plan to re-write jazz historiography. During the international conference, during concerts and an exhibition, however, we hope for a lively discussion about how our understanding of the music, its history and its aesthetic has been shaped. We see jazz as a music with a history of more than a hundred years, and we know that it’s much more complex than history books usually tell us. Our objective is to unravel some more of this complexity, even though we know that we will only be scratching at the surface. We do not just want to look at the past, either, but are just as much interested in papers that focus on today’s developments and their significance in the cultural discourse jazz always was a part of.

The Darmstadt Jazzforum will focus on different aspects of jazz historiography, such as:

Places:
Jazz historiography mostly talks of major cities, of New Orleans, Chicago or New York, of Paris, London or Berlin. An alternative reading might identify other places (such as Charleston, St. Louis, Los Angeles or Lyon, Leeds, Wuppertal) and link these to specific events, movements, or group activities. An alternative reading might also stress the fact that any fixation of cultural activity to a specific place forgets aspects of mobility which are important in a music dealing mostly with cultural encounters. How do “scenes” and connections between scenes work? What does the historigraphic choice of focusing on a specific “place” or the deliberate negation of geographical positioning mean for our understanding of jazz? And what are the specific connections between locations and the music itself?

People:
Jazz historiography often talks about successful or tragic heroes. An alternative reading might move other protagonists into the focus, might talk about temporary networks which enable artistic developments but are much more than mere musical relationships. An alternative reading should not necessarily question the importance of the great personalities but ask what kind of an example they set and/or what examples might have been alternatives from a very different direction. Focusing on people in jazz one needs to ask about the concept of artistic or commercial “success”; one needs to look at the processual aspects of improvisation (as opposed to the “Werk” aesthetic which shines through in most artists’ discographies); and one needs to look at the involvement of artists in the cultural discourses of their direct environments (community, city, scene, politics).

Style:
It seems like those lucky days when jazz history could easily be categorized with clear stylistic distinctions are over since the 1970s. And yet we often search for new descriptions to sum up more recent developments. The designation of stylistic names may be helpful for talking about music, but is it a suitable procedure in the internet era in which genre-hopping is the rule for a whole generation? The discussion about “genre” or “style” needs to take into consideration how such terms and categories have been canonized in the past and are being used in the present, by the music press, the industry, by fans as well as even by those pretending not to like jazz (Branford Marsalis: “People think if nobody sings it’s jazz.”). When questioning the illusion of genre purity, one has to ask about the general necessity  for categories in the first place and speculate about a future with no need to “file under…”

Presentations, Discussions, Concerts, Exhibition

At the 15th Darmstadt Jazzforum all of these topics are addressed by scholars from different disciplines, by journalists and by musicians. An exhibition with photos by Arne Reimer allows a “view behind the scenes” of the public life of jazz musicians. Three concerts will complete the event (and some of the musicians will also talk at the conference). Attending the conference is free. We ask, though, for informal registration.

More about the 15th Darmstadt Jazzforum about “Jazz @ 100. An alternative to a story of heroes” (concerence program, information about the concerts and the exhibition) will be online here in late May.

PS: The language at the Darmstadt Jazzforum conference is English.

Exhibitions

NEW: MySmartGuide tour – powered by R.A.u.M. 103

Clickin’ with Clax
William Claxton – Fotografien
Exhibition at the Jazzinstitut, until 31 July 2021

The exhibition is opened again. We will ask you to make an appointment by phone or email. During your visit we will ask you to wear a surgical or FFP2 mask at all times and to practice the usual hygiene measures.
On appointment we will reserve you one hour during which you (alone, with one person of your own houshold or one person from a second household) will be able to view the show.

Please bring your smart phone along in order to use the SMARTGuide tour.

Appointments: jazz@jazzinstitut.de or +49 6151 963700
Opening hours: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday 10am – 5pm, Friday 10am – 2pm

William Claxton 1960

“Clickin’ with Clax” is an homage to one of the best known photographers in jazz: William Claxton. Many of his pictures have reached cult status and became synonymous with jazz photography.

Also, there is a special history connecting William Claxton and the Jazzinstitut Darmstadt.

More than 60 years ago Claxton accompanied the journalist, author and producer Joachim Ernst Berendt, who had often been called Germany’s “jazz pope” on a research trip through the different US jazz scenes.

Claxton’s black-and-white photos have become iconic jazz memories. Which is what this exhibition is about.