Category Archives: Darmstädter Jazzforum

Destination Unknown:
The future of jazz (blog)

Random thoughts / zufällige Gedanken
zum 18. Darmstädter Jazzforum 2023


9. Januar 2023
... left 2 3 4, right 2 3 4, or: Artificial Intelligence and Jazz

Mark Schieritz has discovered a French website that, purely by "artificial intelligence", locates all sorts of terms according to whether they are politically "left" or "right" (https://linksoderrechts.delemazure.fr/). This leads to curious associations such as: rose = left; tulip = right; tomato = left; rye = right; two = left; three = right. As a test, Schieritz lets numerous everyday words pass through the AI filter and then considers (a) how the classification may have come about and (b) how he himself thinks about it. The French computer science student Theo Délemazure, who programmed the aforementioned website, uses the software GPT3 for this purpose, which processes the entered terms in a kind of blunt context search on the Internet.

Schieritz's article is highly amusing (Die Zeit, behind the paywall). By the way, he also asked Délemazure's AI about musical terms: George Frideric Handel = right; Johann Sebastian Bach = left; C major = right; D major = left. (Schieritz: "D major sounds like revolution, C major sounds like restoration. Don't even ask!") Which made me curious. Jazz, after all, has always been located on the left (correct!). According to Délemazure's AI, it has that in common with New (contemporary composed) Music, with rock (but not right-wing rock), with baroque. Classical is on the left, classical music on the right. Lydian is left, Phrygian is right. Count Basie: left; Glenn Miller: right. And then there are also enough contradictions: Charlie Parker: left, but Bebop: right. Even in the Jazzinstitut Darmstadt we apparently are not all on the same side, at least if the knowledge of artificial intelligence is anything to go by.

But have fun with it yourself: it's great fun to query the website "left or right" (which is available in French and German) for all kinds of terms, names, contexts. And in fact, you can also influence the future (read: future results), by responding if a result doesn't seem right to you.

What does all this have to do with the future of jazz? Well, nothing... or a lot. In fact, quite a lot of research is being done on how artificial intelligence and music can be brought together. Computers are already suitable for analyzing and evaluating music (Jazzomat). You could have "new music" generated of historical jazz greats, as no less than Kenny G recently demonstrated when he fed artificial intelligence samples of Stan Getz's saxophone tone and then had it "invent" a new tune (AI and Jazz). Or: George E. Lewis, trombonist, composer and musicologist, has for a long time been working on computer software allowing him or others to improvise along the computer (MIT lecture). Interaction, re-creation, analysis - the new technologies can therefore be used for all sorts of things.

But how can all of this be used in a musical practice that is so strongly characterized by individuality, authenticity, uniqueness as jazz? Or, to put it another way: Is this kind of individuality aesthetic, which has shaped jazz discourse right up to the present, something we will have to accept for all future? Couldn't we perhaps talk about it? The discussion that is going on everywhere about the hegemony of a European value aesthetic also concerns the ideas of what is actually good in music, what is considered progressive, how important progressiveness is for the development of an art form. Or whether the alternative model to individuality might be that of community, whether progress does not also include the rediscovery of supposedly old practices. Part of the future of every art form is that we constantly renegotiate the space we give it, how it participates in the social and cultural discourse, how it thereby constantly redefines itself, explores its different contexts, consolidates its position in the association of current arts, contributes its political weight, develops its creative power. In all art forms, and thus also in jazz!

Julia Hülsmann = left; Christopher Dell = right; Till Brönner = left; Angelika Niescier = right????

Ah, artificial intelligence, you still have a lot to learn!

Wolfram Knauer (9. Januar 2023)


3. Januar 2023
(7) Jazz ist die Mutter des HipHop

Unlängst stolperte ich über ein Video des Pianisten Robert Glasper, der 2019 in einem “Jazz-Night in America”-Video erklärte “why Jazz is the mother of HipHop”.  Robert Glasper über Jazz und HipHop

Wenn es nach mir geht, brauche ich diese Erklärung gar nicht. Hört man sich die Samples von DJs wie Africa Bambaataa der frühen HipHop-Ära an, ist für mich evident: Dem HipHop fließt Jazz-DNA in den Adern. Und es ist kein Blick über den Großen Teich oder in die Vergangenheit nötig, um die Verbindung zwischen HipHop und Jazz zu finden. Man braucht sich bloß junge Jazz-Schlagzeuger wie Silvan Strauss anzuhören.  Album “Facing” von Silvan Strauss

Längst tue ich mich schwer damit, Jazz oder irgendeine andere Musikform als ein abgeschlossenes Genre anzusehen. Die Zuschreibung von unterschiedlicher Musik zu festgelegten Genre ist ein künstliches (kein künstlerisches) Konstrukt.

Die Eingrenzung und Legitimationsversuche des Jazz in Abgrenzung zur populären Musik machen mich regelmäßig stutzig und das Naserümpfen, wenn es um HipHop-Musik geht, wirft für mich einige Fragen auf. Ist es nicht leichter, Jazz und HipHop, sei es historisch oder musikalisch betrachtet, in den Zusammenhang zu stellen, als sie zu unterscheiden? Und wäre es nicht klüger, in der ständigen Debatte um den hohen Altersdurchschnitt bei Jazzfans von einer reaktionären Denke abzusehen?

Denn wirft man einen realistischen und gegenwartsbezogenen Blick auf das Ganze, stellt man fest, dass die jungen Leute Jazzstandards wegen der HipHop-Samples im Ohr haben und sich dessen gar nicht bewusst sind. Worüber sie sich aber bewusst sind, ist, dass MCs und DJs Zukunftsmusik spielen, sich immer wieder selbst überhöhen und gegenseitig steigern und damit das Innovative in der Szene befeuern, den jungen Leuten eine Zugewandtheit zur Zukunft vermitteln. Virtuos batteln sich Rapper:innen während der Cypher; Freestyle bedeutet Improvisation, bedeutet Innovation. Und das kennen wir doch irgendwoher.

Das alles kann man anerkennen, kann den Geist, der durch diese Musik weht, bündeln und das Potenzial, das in der Innovationsfähigkeit von Jazz und HipHop liegt, nutzen, um für das Große und Ganze eine vorteilhafte Zukunft zu gestalten.

Marie Härtling (3. Januar 2023)


20 December 2022
(6) Jazz: the most political of all art forms... really?

Yes, we do it, too: we like to brag about all the things that jazz stands for: individuality, freedom, openness, tolerance, diversity, experiment, progress, future... But are we really doing the music a service with all of these charges? Or don't they actually stem from our own political strategies to help jazz, i.e. "our" music, gain more prestige and respect, more leeway, more funding?

In fact, jazz is very different things to each of us. For me, Whitney Balliett's definition of the "sound of surprise" is still one of the most coherent. Yes, in the best case jazz surprises me - more than I expect from almost any other art form... but stop! There goes the jazzman in me again, who ascribes to jazz a "more" of abilities than contemporary new music, than advanced forms of popular music, than the avant-garde in visual arts, dance, theater or literature...

And the same holds for "repertoire", i.e. for the recollections of the great recordings of jazz history. In fact, these often enough fall outside our discourse of a progress-oriented art form. The "mainstream" - that is, the jazz mainstream, which is a different term than "mainstream" per se... oh, that's a subject to be discussed separately, how terms so often mean something different when used in different contexts... the mainstream, then, does not appear at all in funding programs for our music. It seems that there is not enough "research" involved, that it only relies on the "pleasing": looking in the rear-view mirror cannot possibly the future, can it! Not to mention traditional jazz. Just look at the winners of the German Jazz Award.

I don't want to criticize all of that. I believe that there is music that is more in need of funding than others, and I believe that we have found quite a good system in this country for creating and securing "spaces" for creative music. BUT: Shouldn't we be honest, identify jazz as just one of numerous avant-gardes and perhaps put the really outstanding thing in the foreground: namely that it actually doesn't fit into our European-influenced avant-garde concept at all, that in it, as an Afro-diasporic tradition, other value standards are possible and are lived, that ideally it always confronts us with our own misunderstandings about this music?

Admittedly: It's hard for me to do without the superlatives. After all, they work quite well in conversation with jazz lovers as much as with jazz newbies. And for me personally, jazz is about all of those things: individuality, freedom, openness, tolerance, diversity, experiment, progress, the future - more than any other form of music. But that has more to do with my own focus than with the music itself.

Perhaps we should just be aware of this from time to time, of the fact that many arguments in favor of jazz are due more to our love of the music than to an objective view of it. And to the fact that they also close our eyes to what a more unbiased view of jazz could contribute to the general cultural discourse.

Wolfram Knauer (20 December 2022)


31 October 2022
(5) just go ahead ... (women in jazz)

The future, after all, is always the present and the past, because we shape it out of what we have experienced, and because we have to start now changing things that we want to be different. This is what is going through my mind these days, while I read in German and American newspapers about Terri Lyne Carrington's publication "New Standards. 101 Lead Sheets by Women Composers" (e.g. die tageszeitung). The topic of "Women in Jazz", of course, is not a new one. At the same time, it is one that can be used almost as an example for how things change within our scene. Until at least the 1970s, female jazz musicians/instrumentalists were rare - at least that's how it seemed, because the press mainly reported on their male colleagues. die tageszeitung). Das Thema “Women in Jazz” ist ja kein Neues. Zugleich ist es eins, an dem sich die Veränderungen in unserer Szene fast schon beispielhaft nachverfolgen lässt. Bis mindestens in die 1970er Jahre hinein waren Jazzmusikerinnen / Instrumentalistinnen rar – zumindest schien dies so, weil die Presse vor allem über ihre männlichen Kollegen berichtete.

Every now and then there were articles about the subject in the jazz press, then in the 1980s the first publications followed documenting a glaring gap in the narrative of jazz history. Rosetta Reitz's record series "Women in Jazz" (1980-1981), Sally Placksin's book "Women in Jazz" (1982), Linda Dahl's "Stormy Weather. The Music and Lives of a Century of Jazzwomen" (1984) essentially changed this narrative. They documented that throughout jazz history there had always been women musicians, vocalists as well as instrumentalists. They thus changed the perception of history, yet these changes did not so much affect the present, which was still characterized by a fundamental skepticism toward female musicians in a male-dominated world.

At first it was singular, then more and more events, workshops, concerts, festivals that focused on the presence of women in jazz. And there were increasing calls for gender-balanced panels, for programs where the quota of women musicians (or at least bandleaders) was at least as high as that of men. There was an awareness that a desirable future can only be achieved by making changes in the present. Parity within juries is now the norm rather than the exception; festivals or workshops that fail to ensure at least adequate representation of women artists face a well-deserved shitstorm. There is still work to be done in university professorships and in radio big bands, but basically the issue has arrived everywhere. It is an issue not only in jazz, but actually in the whole of society, so it can no longer be pushed aside so easily. At the Darmstadt Jazzforum, we, too, have placed a focus on the topic (e.g., 2015: Gender and Identity in Jazz; 2021: Roots | Heimat: Diversity in Jazz), and yet we, too, must allow ourselves to be reproached for not always having designed our program in an exemplary manner: The lack of gender balance is not only prevalent in jazz, but also in jazz research and jazz journalism.

So now Terri Lyne Carrington's "New Standards": an at least ambiguous title for her book, which on the one hand looks for a different repertoire that makes female musicians more visible (audible), but on the other hand also demands new standards in everyday jazz - and not only demands them, but also provides the necessary material for them. In doing so, however, Carrington is not only changing the present; her book - just like her work at the Berklee Institute of Jazz and Gender Justice, which she founded in 2018 - is directed toward the future of jazz. Berklee Institute of Jazz and Gender Justice – ist auf die Zukunft des Jazz gerichtet.

The future, it should be noted, never consists of hope alone; it needs activists in the present. However, this is not exactly new to us; after all we are experiencing this everywhere around us at the moment. Thus, when we talk about the future, we must always look at the discourses of the present, not so much in a critically questioning way than with as encouragement. The more opinions are expressed and involved in the discussion, the more people identify with the topic, the better a future can be negotiated in which everyone feels involved.

(Wolfram Knauer, 31 October 2022)


6 Octber 2022
... "infinite vastness"* ...

Theo Croker recently recorded an original entitled "Jazz Is Dead". Pirmin Bossart headlines his article in the fall issue of the Swiss magazine Jazz 'n' More "Jazz is dead - but creative music is alive" and quotes Croker, who considers genres obsolete and finds that what some hip-hoppers do today "is more jazz than what jazz musicians do".

So there we are, then, with the question that has accompanied jazz for decades and that has become loud again in recent years - under changed auspices: doesn't the label "jazz" tend to hinder the perception of the music as a creative art that reflects the present? Doesn't the label carry far too much ballast around with it and wouldn't we all be helped if we finally stopped dividing music into genres?

My own opinion: I think "jazz" is a great term, but that is because I've known it for so long and because it stands for the music to which I feel so strongly emotionally attached. I find that labels are needed to talk about something - if I didn't have genre labels, I'd have to redefine what I'm talking about every time (of course, that can be nice too, but it's quite tedious...). The problem - in my opinion - is not the labels, but the tendency of many recipients to make these labels absolute, that is, to confuse the label with the thing itself. The problem is still that "jazz" is understood as a clearly circumscribable genre rather than as a musical practice. The problem has been furthered by the recording industry, which very deliberately used to label - "file under jazz / rock / country" etc. - in order to be able to market its products specifically to potential buyers.

But actually it doesn't matter what you call it, as long as you remain aware of the openness of this music. Personally, I have never quite understood that in the - in my opinion - most open music, jazz, of all things, such rigid aesthetic discussions about the permissibility of stylistic developments were even possible, when this music - again: in my opinion - lives precisely from in- instead of exclusivity. This is then how I understand Theo Croker's sentence. If one recognizes "jazz" as a musical practice, it can be found in all kinds of musical projects. Critics warn that this leads to arbitrariness, but in fact such an understanding simply calls for more open and at the same time more precise listening. And why shouldn't one argue from time to time about whether a recording, whether a concert, whether a musical attitude still fulfills the criteria of what "jazz" is for one personally?

Insofar as art is creative, it changes continuously, and with it the aesthetic criteria. All of us who are somehow involved with this music, whether professionally or not, have to deal with this change. Whether we accept it or not, who cares! Creativity makes demands not only on the creators themselves, but also on their recipients. That's why art, especially music, is a mirror of society. Particularly in art, experiments often challenge us to question ourselves, because they distruct the thought patterns in which we have actually made ourselves quite comfortable.

But back to the Darmstadt Jazzforum. We have titled our conference with a Sun Ra quote: "Destination unknown: The future of jazz". The uncertainty of that destination, it's something we're all kind of familiar with: We usually know where we come from, we know what structures we live in. But how we will shape the future, how this future will influence our own life and thinking, we just don't know. However, the unknown, the indeterminate is not only frightening, it also describes the hope for a "better", a "fairer" world.

Development, at any rate, is actually always a step ... forward.

*"Space: infinite vastness" [Der Weltraum: unendliche Weiten] would be the introduction to the TV series "Star Track" in its dubbed German version where the original has: "Space: The final frontier".

(Wolfram Knauer, 6 October 2022)


4 October 2022
(3) If you have visions...

I have mentioned it twice already, thus, today it's about "visions". And, no, you don't have to go to the doctor if you have visions, as Helmut Schmidt once so beautifully advised. It is enough to regularly compare your vision(s) with reality, i.e. to stay aware of the fact that a vision is possibly a long-term goal towards which one can work, which on the one hand, keeps changing itself, but which on the other hand, already by thinking about it, influences one's own perception of reality, and by working on or by talking about it, actually influences reality.

What, then, are visions? In our context, we could speculate about the musical vision, the idea, for example, of creating a constellation of sounds that is unheard of, at least for oneself, or the idea of an intercultural improvisation in which all participating artists follow the conventions to which improvisation is subject in their respective cultures. A vision could be limited only to one's own instrument, to technical details, to the mastery of it, or to mechanical changes that simplify intended musical processes. Wouldn't it be great, could be another vision to work towards, if our society was completely represented in the field of jazz and improvised music, in all its diversity?

Visions are really just that, the idea of an ideal goal. However, they usually have very practical effects, often already on one's own very current actions. The moment I have something in mind that seems desirable to me, I will already check my current actions to see whether they help or hinder the way to get there. And thus, every vision influences my actions. At the same time, my actions influence the vision as well. The vision has the advantage of blocking out reality. When working on its realization one then recognizes what is really possible, better perhaps: what seems possible to oneself, and automatically one adapts one's own vision. With each step, the vision becomes more of a goal, more of a compromise between vision and reality. So that's the third concept here: Vision - Reality - Compromise. But the compromise is not a slimmed down vision, it is what is feasible in reality (for oneself).

Jazz, Jazz Jazz.... For me, jazz has always been a visionary music. I can only speculate about the individual visions of the musicians; even if they talked about it, "expressed" visions are something different than the idea itself. For me, Duke Ellington had the vision that music could capture the reality of the African-American experience and thus enhance understanding of the ills of U.S. society. For me, Charlie Parker had the vision of a musical language in which the coming together of melodic, harmonic, rhythmic aspects with the moment of complexity that came with it, especially through the technical mastery of his instrument, could produce new sonic worlds. Miles Davis and his vision of sound - of his trumpet as well as of his band and his productions. Peter Brötzmann and the / a vision of free interplay. The vision of nationally or regionally connected sounds (Garbarek, Stanko). The vision of a folklore that cannot be assigned (Louis Sclavis, Erika Stucky, ARFI). The vision of jazz as an example of democracy (Willis Conover or the U.S. State Department of the 1950s and 1960s) or as an example of a just society (John Lewis, Billy Taylor, Gunter Hampel). The vision of gender justice - also in jazz (Terri Lyne Carrington). The vision of jazz as a political and social positioning (Abbey Lincoln, Charles Mingus, Archie Shepp, Sebastian Gramss). You don't have to know the visions the musicians had in mind to enjoy their music, but knowing about them adds information to the recordings and concerts. Duke Ellington die Vision, dass Musik die Realität der afro-amerikanischen Erfahrung fassen und damit das Verständnis für die Missstände in der US-amerikanischen Gesellschaft verstärken könne. Für mich hatte Charlie Parker die Vision einer musikalischen Sprache, bei der das Zusammenkommen melodischer, harmonischer, rhythmischer Aspekte mit dem Moment der Komplexität, das insbesondere durch die technische Beherrschung seines Instruments mit hineinkam, neue klangliche Welten hervorbringen konnte. Miles Davis und seine Vision des Klangs – seiner Trompete genauso wie seiner Band und seiner Produktionen. Peter Brötzmann und die / eine Vision des freien Zusammenspiels. Die Vision national oder regional verbundener Klänge (Garbarek, Stanko). Die Vision einer nicht zuordbaren Folklore (Louis Sclavis, Erika Stucky, ARFI). Die Vision des Jazz als eines Beispiels für Demokratie (Willis Conover oder das US-amerikanische State Department der 1950er und 1960er Jahre) oder als Beispiel für eine gerechte Gesellschaft (John Lewis, Billy Taylor, Gunter Hampel). Die Vision von Geschlechtergerechtigkeit – auch im Jazz (Terri Lyne Carrington). Die Vision des Jazz als politische und gesellschaftliche Positionierung (Abbey Lincoln, Charles Mingus, Archie Shepp, Sebastian Gramss). Man muss die Visionen nicht kennen, die den Musikern vorschwebten, um ihre Musik genießen zu können, aber wenn man um sie weiß, gibt das den Aufnahmen und Konzerten noch zusätzliche Informationen.

The examples show: Sometimes it is really about visions, sometimes the musicians - who, I hope you are aware, are only mentioned as examples - have already set out on the path, sometimes you can follow the comparison of vision with reality almost simultaneously. What they all have in common and what the 18th Darmstadt Jazzforum will also be about is: Jazz is a music that is directed towards the future. Musicians want to create something new together with others. They want to generate new sounds, new constellations, new experiences, and ones that reflect their respective present, that - like perhaps every kind of avant-garde - contribute something to the current cultural discourse. But in order to have the freedom to develop artistic visions at all, structures are needed that at least promote them. Such structures can be artists' collectives as well as educational institutions, funding programs as well as state institutions. Visions without the possibility to realize them remain - mostly - visions.

So what is needed to encourage musicians, organizers, journalists, music curators to tackle their visions? We hope to be able to discuss concrete proposals, especially in the panels of the Darmstadt Jazzforum, not about what we don't like in the present, but about how we imagine a better future.

(Wolfram Knauer, 4 October 2022)


28 September 2022
Soothsaying

Ted Gioia has made our 18th Darmstadt Jazzforum the subject of his blog entry today - well, not really, but his post on "20 Predictions for the Music Business in 10 Years" (The Honest Broker) at least makes you wonder what can be said about the future at all. Gioia, partly tongue-in-cheek, predicts that the music of the future will once again be more focused on the music itself, or at least that's what marketing would have us believe. Record labels will no longer play a role in the careers of artists who instead will find ways to capture 80-90 percent of the revenue from their music. The number one hit on the Billboard charts will have been generated by artificial intelligence. The individual tracks of a new album (by a major star) will be auctioned off as separate NFTs before release. Streamed music will generate more revenue than live concerts (isn't that already the case?). There will still be record labels, but they will mainly market their back catalog and worry about the expiration of copyright protection for their products. The new music industry hubs will be in Seoul, Kinshasa and Jakarta. Gioia also goes on to predict that in ten years, trombone sales will skyrocket "after the instrument is implicated in a high-profile celebrity scandal".The Honest Broker) lässt einen zumindest darüber nachdenken, was sich überhaupt über die Zukunft aussagen lässt. Gioia sagt augenzwinkernd voraus, dass die Musik der Zukunft wieder stärker auf das Musikalische fokussiert sein wird, zumindest will uns das Marketing so etwas weismachen wollen. Physische Tonträger werden keine Rolle mehr für die Karriere von Künstler:innen spielen. Diese entwickeln Strategien, beim Vermarkten ihrer Musik im Internet immerhin 80-90 Prozent der Einnahmen für sich behalten zu können. Der größte Hit auf den Billboard-Charts wird von Künstlicher Intelligenz erzeugt worden sein. Die einzelnen Tracks eines neuen Albums (von großen Stars) werden vor Veröffentlichung als NFTs versteigert. Gestreamte Musik wird mehr Umsatz bringen als Livekonzerte (ist das nicht schon heute so?). Es wird weiterhin Plattenfirmen geben, die allerdings vor allem ihren Backkatalog vermarkten und sich um das Auslaufen des Urheberrechtsschutzes für ihre Produkte sorgen. Die neuen Hubs der Musikindustrie werden in Seoul, Kinshasa und Jakarta liegen.  Gioia sagt außerdem noch voraus, dass in zehn Jahren Posaunen zum großen neuen Ding werden, weil es einen groß gehypten Celebrity-Skandal gab, bei dem das Instrument eine zentrale Rolle spielte.

Hmmm, hopefully we will all see. For our topic, at least, one important aspect is emerging: music seems to have been inescapably linked to the development of the recording industry since the 1920s - so much so that technological developments automatically have an impact on musicians' lives, incomes and art. This is true for the entire music industry, but perhaps even more so for jazz because, as improvised music, it has always sold NFTs, non-fungible tokens. Every recording, every performance by jazz musicians is unique. There were and are artists who actually record as much as possible, partly for their own archive (e.g. Duke Ellington in the 1960s), partly to make them accessible to an audience that knows about the singularity of each performance (e.g. Gunter Hampel). Duke Ellington in den 1960ern), teils, um sie zu pressen und einem Publikum zugänglich zu machen, dass um die Singularität eines jeden Auftritts weiß (z.B. Gunter Hampel).

The dystopia of a future music might indeed be the idea that art produced by artificial intelligence could have similar emotional impact as art produced by humans. I'm relatively relaxed about it: Sure, it will be possible to generate music that sounds "like" something else, music that refers to sound clichés of the past, Parker, Coltrane, Miles, but mixes them in a new way. Surely AI will eventually be able to generate music that sounds "like an experiment," like what we find exciting about current improvised music. But can a machine take risks? Improvisational risks, when musicians get involved with the reaction of other colleagues, to which they themselves react; aesthetic risks of the success of a previously presented concept, in the development of which in improvised music one never plans to the end, but rather consciously relies on risktaking? Some experiments with AI exist already, after all (George Lewis' Voyager; Dan Tepfer's "Natural Machines" project). Voyager; Dan Tepfers “Natural Machines”-Projekt).

I don't like comparing music and sports, but still: Sure, a machine can run faster than a human. But will it sweat? Will you smell the excitement? Will you feel the emotional exertion and the joy or disappointment about the result? You can also "smell" music. It is created by musicians acting together, leading to ever new musical conditions, to new sonic connections, to unexpected or also expected reactions, to joy, incipient boredom, thrills or that indescribable becoming-part-of-the-creative-process.

The future of the music industry, and the involvement of musicians in it: certainly an important topic for the Darmstadt Jazzforum. Actually, it has been an important topic in jazz for a long time, at the latest since Charles Mingus and Max Roach wanted to take the marketing of their recordings into their own hands with the Debut record label. What is possible, what is desirable, what is inevitable, what should be prevented at all costs? Or shouldn't we rely on the creativity of our field, which can generate something exciting out of every situation, because it ideally reacts to the present and explores future possibilities instead of regurgitating the past?

Ah, actually I had wanted to write about "Vision and Reality", but now Ted Gioia has lifted me onto another horse for the time being. Next time then...

(Wolfram Knauer, 28 September 2022)


26 September 2022
(1) The devil You (don’t) know…

Foreseeing cultural developments has never really worked out. We are far too stuck in the thought structures that shape our cultural present for that, but we would not only have to foresee artistic discourses, but also alternative spaces in which such discourses can be conducted, topics that we perhaps do not consider that important at the moment, a changed (self-)conception of art. We would have to think about institutions and their changes (cf. e.g. the demands made at the Darmstadt Jazzforum 17 regarding diversity in institutions), political sensitivities (cf. e.g. the discussions about Documenta 15 and the control obligations of curators as well as politics), changes in the perception and recognition of artists and their creative work in society. And of course we would have to think about the artistic statement itself, the creative process and its result, in the case of music the concert, the studio production, the connection with the audience.

What would all this look like in jazz? We have agreed on identifiers for "our" music, albeit in different ways. For example: improvisational, research-oriented, reinterpreting the intensity that ist often defined as "swinging" or "energy play" or by other ways of interlocking rhythmic, melodic and harmonic impulses. A reference to the African-American origins of the music and all the connotations associated with it, especially that of community: that is, that jazz is a music that needs community, the response of the audience. Such a reference can happen quite directly (melodic, harmonic or sound quotation), but equally indirectly ("with the awareness of..."). Currently, this respect for the African-American origin and experience of jazz is increasingly demanded over here (especially in Germany) as well, for example in terms of ethnic diversity in concert and festival programs.

But will this still be the case in ten years, or will the current tendency to actively compensate for social and cultural injustices no longer be considered so important by then, and instead perhaps more attention will be paid to what improvised music can tell us "today," that is, in 2032? Will the House of Jazz be a reality in Berlin and will similar concert spaces be available elsewhere in the republic, either highly subsidized by the public sector or privately financed by commercial financiers who have recognized that artistic research is no less important for their field than that in the analog or virtual laboratory? Will we still have club concerts in front of live audiences, or will the developments of virtual reality enable us to have corresponding shared experiences in a different way? Will the musicians' life still consist primarily of travel, research and teaching, or will they be able to pursue their creative work more and more from home in a co2-neutral way?

Arrghhh... I'm not good at science fiction. Maybe I'm too much of a realist, maybe I'm too fearful, maybe I'm just not enough of an artist.... Anyway, every "Why not!" in my head is followed by a lot of question marks. It is easy to prefer the security of the current reality to the uncertainty of the experiment: "the devil you know is better than the devil you don't know...". I'll leave it at that and suspect: just as I can't imagine the future of jazz, I can't really imagine the discussions we might have about it in September 2023 at the Darmstadt Jazzforum. What makes me feel better is that I know I'm dealing with creative artists who aren't afraid to take a thought and simply spin it further, no matter how much adjustment of the context is necessary. That, after all, is one of the strengths of jazz (as well as other artistic avant-gardes): that it is able to focus on individual motifs, on rhythmic structures, on emotional inklings, to dissect these in each case, and in the process to create something new, as it were, along the way.

Which, however, immediately makes me wonder again whether the future isn't always, well, at least "also" coincidence? But that would be the topic of another blog entry - by the way, just like the topic "vision meets reality", which I would like to think about next time...

Wolfram Knauer (26 September 2022)


All photos on this blog page come from the Sun Ra Archive of the Hartmut Geerken collection at the Jazzinstitut Darmstadt.

Roots | Heimat: Wie offen ist der Jazz: Abstracts

Sorry, but these abstracts are in the language of the corresponding papers (partly German, partly English).


Ablauf der Konferenz:

DONNERSTAG – Nachmittag
30. September 2021

14:00:
Wolfram Knauer
Wie offen ist der Jazz? Ziemlich!

Wolfram Knauer leitet seit 1990 das Jazzinstitut Darmstadt. Er hat zahlreiche Bücher veröffentlicht, zuletzt Monographien über Louis Armstrong (2010, 2021), Charlie Parker (2014), Duke Ellington (2017) sowie ‘Play yourself, man!’ Die Geschichte des Jazz in Deutschland (2019). Im Frühjahr 2008 lehrte er als erster nicht-amerikanischer Louis Armstrong Professor of Jazz Studies an der Columbia University in New York.

Thema:
How is cultural identity formed and how is its perception influenced?

14:30:
Philipp Teriete
Racial Uplift, Community und die Zukunft schwarzer Musik.
Der musikalische Ausbildungskanon an den Historically Black Colleges and Universities im späten 19. und frühen 20. Jh. und der Einfluss auf den frühen Jazz

— abstract: —

Die Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) haben seit ihrer Gründung maßgeblich zum ‘Racial Uplift’ der ‘Black Community’ beigetragen. Die Musikausbildung an den HBCUs zielte im späten 19. und frühen 20. Jh. vor allem darauf ab Musiklehrer:innen für die Schulen und Universitäten im ganzen Land hervorzubringen. Nicht zuletzt deshalb hatten die HBCUs auch eine gewichtige Stimme in der Debatte um die ‘Future of Black Music’ (‘Classical’ vs. ‘Popular’).

In der Jazzforschung ist die Rolle der HBCUs bisher kaum diskutiert worden. Durch die Fokussierung auf das Leben und Werk herausragender ‘Jazz Heroes’ wurde der Blick auf den musikalischen Ausbildungshintergrund der ‘Black Community’ gleichsam verstellt. Gleichzeitig ist die Professionalität der Ausbildung – insbesondere schwarzer Jazzmusiker:innen – unterschätzt worden und man hat ihnen nicht selten ein Autodidaktentum angedichtet. Dabei hatten viele der Protagonist:innen des Jazz entweder selbst an HBCUs studiert oder waren von Lehrer:innen unterrichtet worden, die an HBCUs ausgebildet worden waren. An den HBCUs wurde das musikalische ‘Handwerk’ bis weit ins 20. Jh. anhand ‘klassischer’, europäischer Musik und nach ‘klassischen’ Lehrplänen vermittelt. Diese waren nach dem Vorbild der führenden US-amerikanischen und europäischen Konservatorien entworfen worden und umfassten neben Instrumental- und Gesangsstudiengängen auch musiktheoretische Disziplinen (Harmonielehre, Kontrapunkt etc.).

Ich möchte in meinem Vortrag untersuchen, welchen Einfluss die Ausbildung an den HBCUs auf die Entwicklung schwarzer Jazzmusiker:innen und ihrer Musik gehabt hat. Dabei soll ebenfalls diskutiert werden, inwieweit ‘positive’ und negative Vorurteile und der Geniekult die ästhetischen Wertvorstellungen und die historischen Narrative des Jazz geprägt haben.

— bio: —

Philipp Teriete ist international als Pianist, Komponist und Forscher tätig. Er ist Dozent für Musiktheorie an der HSLU Luzern und arbeitet zurzeit an seinem Promotionsprojekt zum Thema The Influence of 19th-Century European Music Theory on Early Jazz. Philipp studierte Klavier und Musiktheorie an der Hochschule für Musik Freiburg, RAM London, und dem CNSMD Paris, sowie Jazz Composition/Piano an der Norwegian Academy of Music Oslo und der New York University. (philippteriete.com)

15:30:
Anna-Lisa Malmros (engl.)
Black Dada / Ascension Unending
John Tchicai between Amiri Baraka and John Coltrane

— abstract: —

American and European Experimentalism viewed through the life and music of Danish-Congolese musician, composer and educator John Tchicai (1936-2012) whose works is interdisciplinary, as in his many collaboration with poets, first and foremost Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones) and his groundbreaking Black Dada Nihilismus (1965). Anna-Lisa Malmros will start with that poem which builds upon and constructs a long history of black life and trauma, and then survey the perspectives on black music by European philosophers and writers such as Theodor W. Adorno, Slavoj Zizek and Harald Kisiedu.

The talk discusses Tchicai’s different identities, the influence of his Congolese heritage, for instance, the fact that he was one of few European musicians who managed to make a mark on the US-American jazz scene, while Tchicai saw himself as a European first and all. It also discusses the experimental approaches Tchicai was involved in in the 1960s which have resulted in a change of perspective positioning the music somewhere between the complicated mesh of pop-art, modernism, New Music, “serious” art and crossover styles.

— bio: —

Anna-Lise Malmros studied music history and theory at the University of Copenhagen, and wrote her PhD thesis about Alban Berg’s “Lulu”. For several years she worked as a music critic – focusing on rock, blues and pop – for different newspapers and periodicals, but also as an educator and lecturer in high schools and as an administrator in the Danish Music Council, specifically representing rock, pop and jazz. Her biography project on John Tchicai was initiated by Tchicai himself a few years before his death in 2012.

 

16:30: Roundtable 1
Vom Fremdsein, Ankommen, Fremdbleiben. Gespräch über eigene Erfahrung der Identitätswahrnehmung

Ein Gespräch mit der Saxophonistin Gabriele Maurer, dem Kontrabassisten Reza Askari und der Sängerin Simin Tander stellt ganz persönlich die Erfahrungen von Künstler:innen vor, die auf unterschiedliche Art und Weise betroffen sind, durch Hautfarbe, familiäre Herkunft und/oder ihre künstlerische Auseinandersetzung mit Traditionen, die außerhalb ihrer deutschen Heimat liegen (Moderation: Sophie Emilie Beha). Wir haben dieses Panel überschrieben: “Vom Fremdsein, Ankommen, Fremdbleiben. Gespräch über eigene Erfahrung der Identitätswahrnehmung”.

— bio: —

Gabriele Maurer fand im Alter von 3 Jahren zur Musik. In jungen Jahren bestritt sie klassische Wettbewerbe wie Jugend Musiziert bevor sie sich dem Jazz zuwandte und 2017 ihr Studium für Jazzsaxophon an der Musikhochschule Mannheim begann. Seitdem wurde die Newcomerin für ihre genre-freien Kompositionen mit ihrem Projekt “GMQ” und ihrem einladenden Spiel mehrfach ausgezeichnet. “Maurers Weg ist der durch die Musik: Sie ist im Jazz zuhause! Und wer ihr zuhört, fühlt sich bei ihr zu Gast. In einem wundervollen Heim, voller warmer, weicher, fließender Saxophonklänge.” (SWR ‘Kunscht’). (gabrielemaurerquintett.com)

Reza Askari, Bassist aus Köln; ausführliche Vita unter reza-askari.com

 

 

 

Die deutsch afghanische, aus Köln stammende Sängerin und Komponistin Simin Tander gehört zu den aufregendsten Persönlichkeiten des europäischen Jazz. Sie “balanciert an der Grenze von Schmerz und Schönheit, von Grazie und Leidenschaft” (Augsburger Allgemeine) und verzaubert mit einem Klangreichtum und einer Intensität, wie man sie selten erlebt. Sie interpretiert und komponiert Texte und Lieder auf unterschiedlichen Sprachen, so auch auf Paschtu, der Sprache der Afghanen und ihres früh verstorbenen Vaters. In den vergangenen 15 Jahren tourte sie mit ihrem niederländische Quartett auf internationalen Festivals (u.a. North Sea Jazz Festival, Hongkong Jazzfestival, Madrid Jazzfestival, Philharmonie Essen, Jarasum Jazzfestival South Korea) und veröffentlichte zwei hoch gelobte Alben in Eigenregie. Gemeinsam mit dem norwegischen Star-Pianisten Tord Gustavsen gab sie mit What was said (2016) ihr Debut auf dem renommierten Label ECM Records. Es folgten weltweite Tourneen (u.a. London Jazz Festival, Montreal Jazzfestival, Brussels Jazzfestival, San Francisco SF Jazz Fest),  enthusiastische Kritiken und der Jahrespreis der Deutschen Schallplattenkritik. Im Herbst 2020 erschien Simin Tanders neuestes Werk Unfading (Jazzhaus Records), eine Hommage an weibliche Dichterinnen aus unterschiedlichen Kulturen und Epochen. Neben zahlreichen weiteren, internationalen Projekten doziert Simin an der Hochschule für Musik und Tanz Köln und gibt weltweit Workshops. (simintander.com)

Sophie Emilie Beha ist Musikjournalistin. Sie moderiert Radiosendungen, Konzerteinführungen, Podiumsdiskussionen und Livestreams. Daneben schreibt sie Texte für verschiedene Fachmagazine und Zeitungen und managt Social-Media-Kanäle. (twitter.com/sophiemiliebeha)


FREITAG – Vormittag
1. Oktober 2021

Thema:
Aneignung und nationales Selbstverständnis (case studies)

9:30:
Philipp Schmickl
Centrisms at the periphery?
Tracing and documenting the impact of an African-American avantgarde jazz musician on a jazz club located at the European margins

— abstract: —

In 1978 the young Austrian jazz club owner Hans Falb (born 1954) met the African-American avantgarde jazz musician Clifford Thornton (1936–1983). Thornton who also was an ethnomusicologist (who took part in the Pan-African Cultural Festival 1969 in Algiers) and until the early 1970s appeared as a supporter of the Black Panther Party, became a guide in musical, spiritual and political matters for Falb who just had opened his place, the Jazzgalerie Nickelsdorf, right at the border between the Eastern and Western blocs.

Although Thornton died in 1983, his presence at the Jazzgalerie is still evident today, however not as easily perceivable as a portrait hanging on the wall. The impression that the exchange during the three years until Thornton’s last Nickelsdorf-visit in 1981 made on the Jazzgalerie, was strong. By looking at source material from the Jazzgalerie’s archive that relates to Thornton – interviews, letters, records or recordings –, I will touch on questions of centers and peripheries in the conceptualization of the nature of jazz music as well as on genesis myths and the identification of its roots and origins. I will argue that Thornton’s partisan but still open-minded views on these questions contributed strongly to the local identity of the Jazzgalerie and endorsed its development to one of the globally most important places for free jazz and improvised music.

The source material as well as the strong character of the locality suggest that one cannot speak of a simple import of Thornton’s beliefs and music – they must be evaluated in light of the local conditions. Here concepts of glocalization or hybridity are key to the understanding of the practices the encounter entailed.

— bio: —

Philipp Schmickl graduated in anthropology (University of Vienna, 2010) with the thesis Das scape jazzistique. Improvisationen in einem globalen Feld. In 2011 he started the book-series THEORAL and published 15 issues of conversations with improvising musicians in German, English and French and visited many (and worked for some) festivals in Europe, Lebanon and Mexico. Science stipend of the City of Vienna in 2015 and 2017. Since March 2020 he is a PhD-student at the University of Music and Performing Arts in Graz (Institute of Jazz Research) where he is researching the history of the “Konfrontationen”, a 40-years-old festival for free jazz and improvised music. (musicaustria.at)

Ádám Havas
Towards the Deconstruction of Hegemonic Narratives
Romani Musicians’ Role in the Articulation of East European Difference

— abstract: —

Drawing on his research on the Hungarian jazz scene Ádám Havas presents his findings on the meanings of the bebop tradition through the cultural practices of Hungarian Romani jazz musicians. The presentation will cast light on how practicing jazz becomes a main instrument for reinventing “otherness”, East-European “difference” and, at the same time, to acquire social status within a semi-peripheral geopolitical context.

— bio: —

Ádám Havas earned his PhD in sociology from Corvinus University of Budapest in 2018. He currently serves as Head of Social Sciences at Milestone Institute. His research focuses on the cultural constructions of jazz in East Central Europe. His publications appeared in Popular Music, Jazz Research Journal, Jazz Research News, Hungarian Studies and LeftEast, among others. He has recently submitted his book manuscript The Genesis and Structure of the Hungarian Jazz Diaspora.  He is co-editing with Bruce Johnson a special issue of Popular Music & Society on global jazz diasporas, and co-edits with Bruce Johnson and David Horn the Routledge Companion to Diasporic Jazz Studies. (milestone-institute.org/staff-faculty/adam-kornel-havas)

11:30:
Niklaus Troxler
im Gespräch mit Wolfram Knauer

— abstract: —

Niklaus Troxler schließlich, dessen Plakate Thema einer Ausstellung im Jazzinstitut sind, wird über seinen eigenen Weg zum Jazz erzählen, als Fan, als Begründer und langjähriger Veranstalter des Willisau Jazzfestivals, mit dem er Musiker:innen, für die sein Herz schlägt, in die Schweiz holen konnte, sowie als international renommierter Grafiker und Plakatkünstler.

— bio: —

Niklaus Troxler, geb. 1.5.1947 in Willisau/Schweiz. Graphic Designer. Organisierte Jazzkonzerte in Willisau von 1966-2013, das Jazz Festival Willisau von 1975-2009. Professor für Kommunikationsdesign an der Staatl. Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Stuttgart 1998-2013. Viele internationale Design- und Kunstpreise. Seine Plakate sind in den wichtigsten Designsammlungen, so u.a. im Museum of Modern Art in New York, im Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe in Hamburg, Kunstbibliothek Berlin, Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. Wohnt in Willisau/Schweiz und Berlin. (troxlerart.ch)


FREITAG – Nachmittag
1. Oktober 2021

Thema:
“Wir” und die anderen

14:00:
Harald Kisiedu
“We Are Bessie Smith’s Grandchildren”
Reflections on Creolization in post-1950s Jazz in Europe

— abstract: —

Histories of post-1950s jazz in Europe are by and large still shaped by an emancipation discourse which posits that during the 1960s white European improvisers came into their own by dissociating themselves from their African American spiritual fathers. Challenging a historical narrative in which “European” is usually used as a synonym for “white” and going beyond both Eurocentric and US-centric perspectives, this paper argues for a decentered perspective with respect to historiographies of jazz in Europe. Such a perspective not only allows for the uncovering of a hidden history of critically important Afro-diasporic contributions to experimental jazz in Europe and of deeply meaningful interactions between Afro-diasporic and white European improvisers but also accounts for jazz’s global dimension and the transfer of ideas beyond nationally conceived spaces. European improvisers’ sustained engagement with black musical knowledge amounts to a cultural dynamic, which may best be described in terms of creolization.

— bio: —

Harald Kisiedu is a historical musicologist and received his doctorate from Columbia University. His research interests include jazz as a global phenomenon, music of the African diaspora, black experimental music, post-war European avant-garde, improvisation, transnationalism and Wagner. Kisiedu is also a saxophonist and has performed with Branford Marsalis, George Lewis, Henry Grimes, Hannibal Lokumbe and Champion Jack Dupree. He has made recordings with the NY-based ensemble Burnt Sugar the Arkestra Chamber and composer/improviser Jeff Morris. He is a lecturer in jazz history and jazz studies at the Institute of Music at the University of Applied Sciences Osnabrück. Kisiedu is the author of European Echoes: Jazz Experimentalism in Germany, 1950-1975, published by Wolke Verlag. (haraldkisiedu.com)

Timo Vollbrecht
Das Problem des “othering” und die Handlungsmacht weißer Musiker:innen

— abstract: —

Das vorliegende Paper thematisiert das Problem des „othering” in einer postmigrantischen und stilistisch zunehmend vielfältigen Musikszene, in der eurozentrische Perspektiven nach wie vor als goldener Standard gelten. Im Vorfeld geführte Gespräche mit BPoC-Jazz-Musiker*innen geben zunächst einen Einblick in deren Erfahrungen, als „Andere“ behandelt und in ihrer Person/Kunst/Musik exotisiert zu werden. Diese Erlebnisse reihen sich ein in eine lange Tradition des Exotismus, die den Jazz und andere Musikrichtungen seit jeher begleitet. Von diesen Gesprächen ausgehend wird diskutiert, welche Rolle insbesondere weiße Musiker*innen einnehmen können, um mehr Gerechtigkeit in der Musikszene zu erreichen. Im Fokus stehen dabei das Erkennen der eigener Handlungsmacht, das Konzept des Verbündet-Seins, Artistic Citizenship und, nicht zuletzt, die konstruktivistische Kraft der Musik selbst.

— bio: —

Timo Vollbrecht ist ein international tätiger Jazzsaxofonist, Komponist und Forscher. Er studierte Saxofon in Berlin und New York, ist aktiv in die Musikszene in Brooklyn eingebunden, wo er u.a. mit Ben Monder, Theo Bleckmann und Ralph Alessi spielt, während er mit seiner Band Fly Magic in Deutschland und Europa tourt. Im Rahmen seiner Promotion analysierte er den künstlerischen Prozess des ECM Records-Produzenten Manfred Eicher im Tonstudio. Derzeit lehrt er an der Jazzabteilung der New York University. (timovollbrecht.com)

Stephan Meinberg
Vom Umgang mit dem Privilegiert-Sein

— abstract: —

In Verhältnisse geboren, die (Zwischen-)Ergebnis vieler Jahrhunderte vorheriger Geschichte sind, werden wir in mannigfacher Weise von diesen Verhältnissen und so auch von dieser Geschichte geprägt. Wie wir damit individuell und in verschiedenen kollektiven Zusammenhängen umgehen, hängt von vielen, darunter auch subjektiven Faktoren ab. Wie groß ist zum Beispiel unsere Motivation, uns überhaupt umfassender über das Zustande-Kommen unserer jeweiligen Situiertheit bewusst zu werden? Angenommen wir werden als “weiß” gelesen. Damit sind wir in einer Realität vielfacher Benachteiligung von als nicht-“weiß” kategorisierten Menschen in eine in dieser Hinsicht bevorzugte, privilegierte Position gestellt mit substanziellen, durchschnittlich auch sehr deutlichen materiellen Folgen. Und das unabhängig davon, ob wir selber das nun wollen oder nicht. Wie verhalten wir uns dazu? Weiter gehende Annahme: wir werden als “weiß” gelesen und  haben zugleich eine Vorliebe für bestimmte afroamerikanische Musiken, zum Beispiel Jazz.  Vielleicht ist unser Enthusiasmus für diese Musik sogar so stark, dass wir uns mit ihr  in der einen oder anderen Form auch beruflich befassen, also einen erheblichen Teil unseres Lebens mit ihr verbringen. Dies dann nicht zuletzt auch, um so die von uns benötigten, sogenannten “Brötchen” zu organisieren. Welchen Stellenwert haben für uns die sozialen Umstände, in denen diese Musik ursprünglich entstanden ist? Und wie ausgeprägt ist unser Interesse, die weitere Entwicklung dieser Umstände bis heute
zu verstehen? Hat das eventuell und wenn ja welche Auswirkungen auf unsere konkrete Praxis mit der Musik? Hat es möglicherweise auch Auswirkungen auf Aspekte unseres Lebens jenseits der Musik?

— bio: —

Der Trompeter Stephan Meinberg absolvierte zunächst ein Studium der europäischen Klassik an der Musikhochschule Lübeck, dann ein Jazz-Studium an der Musikhochschule Köln und 1999/2000 als DAAD-Stipendiat ein zusätzliches Studienjahr an der New School University, New York (u.a. bei Billy Harper, Reggie Workman, etc). Mit seinem Quintett Vitamine sowie den kollektiven Gruppen Heelium, moLd und Arnie Bolden veröffentlichte er insgesamt sieben CDs. Als Sideman arbeitete Stephan Meinberg u.a. mit Matthäus Winnitzkis Trio Cnirbs, Andre Nendza A-Tronic, Nils-Wogram-Septet, Dieter Glawischnig Hamburg Ensemble, Salsa-Gruppen von Javier Plaza und Bazon Quiero, NDR-BigBand (unter Leitung von Steve Gray, Maria Schneider, Bob Brookmeyer, uvm). Für das Goethe-Institut spielte er in Afrika, Asien, Europa und Nordamerika. (jazzinstitut.de/deutsch-dozentinnen-und-dozenten-2021/#2021meinberg)

16:30: Panel 2
An die Arbeit: Realität verändern!!!

  • Joana Tischkau + Frieder Blume
  • Jean-Paul Bourelly
  • Kornelia Vossebein
  • Moderation: Sophie Emilie Beha

— abstract: —

In einem Roundtable mit zwei dem Gitarristen Jean-Paul Bourelly, der Veranstalterin Kornelia Vossebein und den Kulturaktivist:innen Joana Tischkau und Frieder Blume wollen wir schließlich darüber diskutieren, was es bedarf, um nicht nur zu einem Bewusstseinswandel, sondern darüber hinaus auch zu einer anderen Repräsentation von Musiker:innen auf der Bühne beizutragen (Moderation: Sophie Emilie Beha). Wir haben dieses Panel optimistisch überschrieben: “An die Arbeit: Realität verändern!!!”

— bios: —

Joana Tischkau ist freischaffende Choreografin und Performerin. In ihren Arbeiten versucht Sie die Absurdität und Willkür diverser Unterdrückungsmechanismen aufzuzeigen und bedient sich dabei an postkolonialen Theorien, feministischen Diskurse und popkulturellen Phänomenen. Aus diesen Überlegungen entwickelte sie die Solo Arbeit WHAT.YEAH., die 2014 zum Festival WORKS AT WORK in der Danshallerne Kopenhagen eingeladen wurde. Gemeinsam mit Elisabeth Hampe (Dramaturgie) und Frieder Blume (Sound Design) folgte das Stück TPFKAWY/Thepieceformerlyknownaswhatyeah, welche bei den Hessischen Theatertagen in Darmstadt 2017 gezeigt wurde. Ihre Masterabschlussarbeit PLAYBLACK, welche am Künstlerhaus Mousonturm in Frankfurt uraufgeführt wurde im Frühjahr/Sommer 2020 zur Tanzplattform Deutschland, dem Impulse Festival Showcase in NRW, sowie nach HELLERAU, europäisches Zentrum der Künste in Dresden eingeladen. In Tischkaus Folgearbeit BEING PINK AIN‘T EASY richtet sie die Auseinandersetzung noch stärker auf die weiße Behauptung von Neutralität, Normativität und Universalität und dem gleichzeitigen Begehren nach Schwarzer Verkörperung.  BEING PINK AIN’T EASY prämierte im Oktober 2019 an de Sophiensælen in Berlin und wurde zum Friendly Confrontations Festival an den Münchner Kammerspielen sowie dem Tanzquartier in Wien eingeladen. Gemeinsam mit Elisabeth Hampe, Anta Helena Recke und Frieder Blume gründete sie 2020 das Deutsche Museum für Schwarze Unterhaltung und Black Music (DMSUBM) welches In Frankfurt am Main und in Berlin eröffnet wurde. Das DMSUBM ist Deutschlands führendes Museum für Schwarze Kultur, Popularmusik und Geschichte. Es beherbergt ein umfassendes Archiv an Schallplatten, Magazinen, Autogrammen und Erinnerungsstücken, die an einem lebendigen Ort der Vermittlung und Diskussion von Schwarzer Geschichte ausgestellt werden. Joana Tischkau lebt und arbeitet in Frankfurt am Main und Berlin. (berlinerfestspiele.de)

Frieder Blume ist Musikwissenschaftler, Komponist und Produzent. Er studierte Musikwissenschaft und Gender Studies an der Humboldt Universität in Berlin wo er sich mit  den Verknüpfungen von Musik und gesellschaftlichen Identitätskonstruktionen beschäftigte. Als Sound Designer arbeitete er mit Joana Tischkau und Elisabeth Hampe an den Produktionen Being Pink Ain’t Easy (2019) und Colonastics (2020) zusammen. In 2020 komponierte er die Musik für den Film The Book of S of I. Chapter One: Creatures Born from Hopelessness für die Künstlerin und Filmemacherin Maren Blume. (ra.co/dj/friederblume/biography)

Raised by first-generation Haitians, Jean-Paul Bourelly grew up amidst an unusual blend of Haitian meringue, folkloric, and hard-edged urban blues of Chicago’s South Side. Along with his own singular musical vision, inspired by Howlin Wolf, Jimi Hendrix and a splash of Carlos Santana, Bourelly began to formulate his unique musical synthesis. At the age of 18, after a one year scholarship studying with the great alto saxophonist and educator Bunky Green, he moved to New York. During his early years he worked with notable jazz figures like drummer Elvin Jones, Pharoah Sanders, AACM founder Muhal Richard Abrams, Roy Haynes and recorded with Miles Davis. Along with engagements at the original Knitting Factory and tours in Europe he was an important figure on scenes like the Black Rock Coalition and Mbase. Reconnecting with Haitian musicians from the popular folkloric group Foula, he formed Ayibobo which merged his Haitian and his jazz improvisational sensibility. This was a first sign of him discovering his sound within an African space. In Berlin, he renewed his focus on the sound which today may be called Afro Futuristic. This was affirmed by his collaboration with historian Paul Gilroy on the Black Atlantic project (Berlin HKW 2004). This work would take him towards a wider perspective, an ideal of a possible Black Atlantic sound, something that could encompass the totality of his style. (bourelly.com)

Kornelia Vossebein ist Projektleiterin “NICA artist development” im Europäischen Zentrum für Jazz und aktuelle Musik Stadtgarten Köln. Zuvor hatte sie die künstlerische Leitung etwa des Bunker Ulmenwall in Bielefeld und des soziokulturellen Zentrums Zeche Karl in Essen inne. Sie arbeitete für Festivals wie das moers Festival und die Monheim Triennale und engagiert sich in zahlreichen Gremien auf Landes- wie Bundesebene,  ist so beispielsweise seit 2018 eine vond rei Sprecher:innen der Bundeskonferenz Jazz. (NICA)

 

Sophie Emilie Beha ist Musikjournalistin. Sie moderiert Radiosendungen, Konzerteinführungen, Podiumsdiskussionen und Livestreams. Daneben schreibt sie Texte für verschiedene Fachmagazine und Zeitungen und managt Social-Media-Kanäle. (twitter.com/sophiemiliebeha)


SAMSTAG – Vormittag
2.
Oktober 2021

Thema:
Von Leuten und Liedern (case studies)

9:30:
Nico Thom
“Der Mann mit der schwarzen Stimme”.
Europäischer Amerikanismus am Beispiel von Bill Ramsey

— abstract: —

Der 1931 in Cincinnati/Ohio (USA) geborene Jazz-, Rhythm’n’Blues- und Folk-Sänger William McCreery Ramsey hat im deutschsprachigen Raum vor allem als Schlagersänger Bill Ramsey Bekanntheit erlangt. Er war darüber hinaus als Schauspieler, Moderator und Hochschuldozent sehr aktiv gewesen. Seit 1951 lebte und arbeitete er in Deutschland und der Schweiz; erst in Frankfurt am Main, dann in Zürich sowie Wiesbaden und seit 1991 in Hamburg, wo er bis zu seinem Tod im Juli 2021 seinen Ruhestand verbrachte. 1984 erhielt er die deutsche Staatsbürgerschaft.

Anhand Ramseys Lebensgeschichte und seines künstlerischen Schaffens soll das kulturelle Phänomen des Europäischen Amerikanismus thematisiert werden. Gemeint ist damit die Amerikanisierung Europas, bei der sich die “westeuropäischen Nachkriegsgesellschaften aktiv mit strategischen Eigeninteressen und geschickten Aneignungsstrategien an der Amerikanisierung beteiligt haben”.

Im Vortrag werden unter anderem die Institutionen beleuchtet, die Ramseys Popularität befördert haben, z.B. die Radiosender American Forces Network (AFN) und das Kultur-Programm des Hessischen Rundfunks (HR 2 Kultur), die Fernsehsender Südwestfunk (SWF) und das Erste Deutsche Fernsehen (ARD) sowie die Plattenlabel Polydor und Bear Family Records.

Auch einzelne Weggefährten von Ramsey werden in den Fokus genommen; bspw. der österreichische Filmregisseur Franz Marischka, der schweizer Jazz- und Schlagermusiker Hazy Osterwald sowie die beiden deutschen Musikproduzenten Heinz Gietz und Kurt Feltz.

Nicht zuletzt der rassisch-konnotierte Hautfarben-Aspekt soll zur Sprache kommen, denn obwohl Ramsey kein Afro-Amerikaner ist, wird ihm ein “schwarzes Timbre” zugeschrieben. 

— bio: —

Nico Thom studierte Musikwissenschaft, Philosophie, Wissenschafts-management und Hochschuldidaktik an den Universitäten in Leipzig, Halle/Saale, Jena, Oldenburg sowie Hamburg. Promotion an der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. Er forschte und lehrte an (Musik-) Hochschulen und Universitäten in Leipzig, Klagenfurt (Österreich), Weimar, Rostock, Lübeck und Hannover. Seit 2021 ist er an der Hochschule für Künste in Bremen tätig. Neben seinen Aktivitäten in Forschung, Lehre und Verwaltung agiert er als Jazzmusiker und Labelbetreiber. (nico-thom.info/)

10:30:
Peter Kemper
“Ich hatte halt den Blues nicht mit der Muttermilch eingesogen.”
Heinz Sauer & Archie Shepp – Differenzen eines musikalischen Dialogs

— abstract: —

Als am 24. September 1978 auf dem Deutschen Jazzfestival Frankfurt Heinz Sauer, Archie Shepp und George Adams in einer “Tenorsax-Battle” aufeinandertrafen, kam es zu einer beispielhaften Kollision “afro-amerikanischer” und “europäischer” Jazzästhetik. Noch heute treiben die Erfahrungen von damals Heinz Sauer selbstreflexiv um: “Ich bin wirklich kein Rassist, aber ich dachte damals, verdammt, das schaffst du nicht, da hättest du auch so eine schwarze Mama haben müssen wie Shepp, die dich in den Armen wiegte. Ich hatte halt den Blues nicht mit der Muttermilch eingesogen, den ganzen afro-amerikanischen Background. Und ich dachte sofort, das darfst du nicht imitieren. Der hat etwas in seinem Blut, das du als weißer Deutscher nicht hast.” (H.S. 2020)

An dieser Begegnung des Black Music-Verfechters Shepp, der als selbstbewusster Dramaturg des Free Jazz und später als aufgeklärter Neo-Traditionalist immer die Emanzipationspotentiale der “African American Music” freizulegen suchte, mit dem durch europäische Klassik und einem national-konservativ geprägten Elternhaus sozialisierten Sauer lassen sich zahlreiche Aspekte des Kongressthemas exemplifizieren: Ist Jazz eine genuin afro-amerikanische Musik, die ihre Wurzeln in der black community heute mehr und mehr zu verlieren droht? Ist das selbst schon eine europäische Sichtweise? Warum verkörpert Jazz für Heinz Sauer immer den “Sound der Freiheit”? Gibt es ästhetische Qualitäten des Jazz, die über alle ethnischen, geographischen und nationalen Identitäten hinausweisen?

— bio: —

Peter Kemper, Jahrgang 1950, langjähriger Kulturredakteur im Hessischen Rundfunk (hr), von 1981 bis 2015 einer der Programmverantwortlichen für das Deutsche Jazzfestival Frankfurt. Seit 1981 Musikkritiker im Feuilleton der Frankfurter Allgemeinen Zeitung. Zahlreiche Veröffentlichungen, zuletzt John Coltrane – Eine Biographie und Eric Clapton – Ein Leben für den Blues, 2023 erscheint Der Sound der Freiheit – Jazz als Kampf um Anerkennung (alle Reclam-Verlag). (schallplattenkritik.de/jury/peter-kemper)

11:30:
Vincent Bababoutilabo
#BlackLivesMatter in der Musikpädagogik?
Über die Notwendigkeit rassismuskritischer Perspektiven in der Musikpädagogik

— abstract: —

Rassismus greift in unser menschliches Miteinander ein. Er trennt Menschen, versucht sie in Kategorien, Identitäten, Nationen, Kulturen oder Ethnien einzuschließen, unterstellt ein “kollektives Wesen”, bestimmt was “normal”, “eigen” oder “fremd” ist und organisiert Zugänge zu gesellschaftlichen Rechten, Teilhabe sowie Reichtum.

U.a. der grausame Anschlag von Hanau sowie die zahlreichen, darauffolgenden #BlackLivesMatter-Proteste des Jahres 2020 zeigten uns: Rassismus ist eine historisch gewachsene Realität, auch in Deutschland. Er durchdringt alle Bereiche, davon ist auch Jazzmusik nicht ausgenommen.

Wie stellt sich Rassismus im Jazz-Bereich dar? Was können wir dagegen tun? Diese Fragen greift Vincent Bababoutilabo auf. In seinem Vortrag präsentiert er eine Einführung in rassismuskritische Perspektiven, historischen Überblick sowie eine Diskussion von Jazz als antirassistische Praxis.

— bio: —

Vincent Bababoutilabo ist ein in Berlin lebender Musiker, Autor und Aktivist an der Schnittstelle zwischen Kunst und Politik. In den letzten Jahren fokussierten seine künstlerischen, wissenschaftlichen sowie aktivistischen Projekte insbesondere die Bereiche Migration, Flucht, Dekolonisierung, Ausbeutung und Widerständigkeit sowie die Suche nach positiven Visionen für eine gerechte Gesellschaft, in der wir alle ohne Angst verschieden sein können. Er ist freier Referent für rassismuskritische Musikpädagogik und Mitglied in zahlreichen zivilgesellschaftlichen Initiativen wie dem NSU-Tribunal oder der Initiative Schwarze Menschen in Deutschland (ISD-Bund e.V.). (bababoutilabo.jimdofree.com)


SAMSTAG – Nachmittag
2. Oktober 2021

Thema:
Wie wir die Welt sehen

14:00:
Jo Wespel & Sanni Lötzsch

FESTIVAL BOOST NOW! – Selbstermächtigung der Musiker:innen, Communities und zugängliche Strukturen

— abstract: —

Gemeinsam mit einem Kollektiv weiterer Musiker:innen riefen Jo Wespel und Sanni Lötzsch im Juni 2021 zu einer zukunftsorientierten und emanzipatorischen Meta Community auf. Sie streben 52 – deutschlandweit vernetzte – Communitys an, die jeweils 52 einwöchige Musikfestivals im interdisziplinären Austausch und in einem “antirassistischen, queerfeministischen und gemeinwohlorientierten” Rahmen veranstalten. In ihrer Realutopie “Festival Boost Now!”wollen sie die strukturell bedingte Chancenungleichheit sowie den Konkurrenzkampf in der Non-Mainstream-Music ausmanövrieren, ein größeres und diverseres Publikum ansprechen, die Demokratie stärken sowie frische Musik und Kunst fördern. Das Ziel: Jährlich und institutionell 365 Tage innovative MUSIK, Gemeinwohl, Interdisziplinarität, Multiperspektivität, Intersektionalität, Antirassismus, Queerfeminismus, Diversität, Plurale Ökonomik, Aktivismus, Nachhaltigkeit, Kooperation, Bildung, Demokratie, Vorträge, Flashmobs, Workshops, Unterricht für Benachteiligte, Transparenz, Inklusion, Offenheit, Respekt, Potenzialentfaltung, Gemeinschaft → FUN!

Schlagzeuger Jim Black nennt das Konzept “ein Leuchtfeuer der Inspiration”. “They not only dream of what‘s possible, they actually turn these ideas and inspirations into tangible realities, that we can all take part in, … a completely immersive experience.“

–bios:–

Sanni Lötzsch ist Musikerin, Komponistin und Produzentin, Subkultur-Festival-Organisatorin und Queerfeministin. Sie ist musikalisch vor allem mit ihrem Solo-Projekt KID BE KID international unterwegs und auf renommierten Festivals wie dem Festival International de Jazz de Montréal (CAN), Elbjazz, Fusion Festival, X-Jazz  u.v.m. zu sehen gewesen. Ihr einzigartiges Skillset aus Beatboxing, Gesang, Klavier und Synthesizer trifft auf poetische Lyrics und rhythmische Virtuosität. Als Mitglied des Subwater-Beats-Kollektivs aus Berlin und Dresden hat sie zahlreiche Festivals und Konzerte mitorganisiert. Durch ihr künstlerisches Schaffen sowie in Workshops für Beatboxing, Arrangement, Komposition und Gesang empowered sie Menschen als wichtiges Vorbild auf dem Weg in eine Gesellschaft, die keine Rollenklischees mehr braucht. (springstoff.com)

Der Gitarrist Jo Wespel ist auch Komponist, Producer, Forscher, Tutor, Denker, (Festival-) Organisator, Postzeitgenosse, Subkulturschaffender, Xenofeminist,  Motivator, Antirassist, Reisender, leidenschaftlicher Lacher und privilegierter  Bewohner des Planeten Erde. Seine prozess- und nachhaltigkeitsorientierten Bands und Projekte sind: Zur Schönen Aussicht, Sinularia, Beatdenker, Recursive Rhythm Get-Together, Festival Boost Now! und das Subwater Beats Kollektiv. Egal was er macht, es geht immer um Austausch, Energie, Innovation, Synergie, Spekulation,  Multidimensionalität, Offenheit, Community, Pluralismus, Vorstellungskraft,  Rhythmus, Frische, Komplexität, Menschen und endless FUN! (subwaterbeats.de)

15:00:
Luise Volkmann
Ritualität im Jazz

Luise Volkmann & Ella O’Brien-Coker
Ritualität, unsere vielen Identitäten und das performative Sprechen

— abstract: —

Kommt! Singt, nein schreit unsere Hymne “Kill your darlings, live the kitsch, we dance down our creed. There’s to many walls ’round here, dreams to come”. In der Arbeit mit ihrem Ensemble LEONEsauvage beschäftigt sich Luise Volkmann seit einigen Jahren damit einen musikalisch-rituellen Moment zu schaffen, der Musiker:innen und Publikum gemeinsam in Ekstase bringt: “vowing we bear creative notion”. In Bezugnahme auf verschiedene afrikanische Musikauffassungen und afroamerikanischen Free Jazz reflektiert sie in ihrer Arbeit ihr Selbstbild als deutsche Musikerin sowie neue und alte Formen von Musik, Konzert, Grenze und Ritual.

Anders als in Diskursen um kulturelle Aneignung, möchte Volkmann mit dem Konzept des Rituals die verbindenden Seins-Ebenen in den Vordergrund stellen: “let’s uphold the seldom glance of recognition”. Im Ritual vermutet Volkmann verbindende Elemente der Alltäglichkeit, der Gemeinschaft und der kraftvollen Praxis von Musik. In einer rituellen lecture performance sucht Volkmann nach Wegen des Mehr-Mensch-Sein.

Mit dem Mensch-Sein und mit unseren vielen Identitäten beschäftigt sich im Anschluss das inszenierte Gespräch von Ella O’Brien-Coker und Luise Volkmann. Sie arbeiten sich an verschiedenen Ängsten, Hemmungen und Rollen* ab, die Debatten um unterschiedliche Diskriminierungsformen immer wieder begleiten und verändern. (*LUISE: Auch unsere Diskurse sind ritualisiert).

Im Zwiegespräch wird das Spannungsfeld zwischen Identität, Positionierung und somit der Frage von (Un)Eindeutigkeit erschlossen. Was bedeutet eine tiefere Verhandlung der inneren Verhältnisse nach Außen? Und inwiefern kann dies zum aktuellen Diskurs beitragen?

In einem performativen Prozess dekonstruieren sie ihre Identitäten als weiße* und Schwarze Frauen* in einen Raum voller Gefühle, Sensibilität und Vertrauen (*ELLA: de-koloniale und queer-feministische Schreibpraxis, z.B. dass wir bei weiß und Schwarz nicht von visuellen Beschreibungen, sondern von der gesellschaftlichen Erfahrung sprechen).

#Ritual, Safer Space, Begegnung, Gemeinschaft, Gefühl, Liebe, Empowerment, Performativ, Intersektionalität, Identität

— bios: —

Luise Volkmann ist eine junge Composer-Performerin aus Bielefeld. Sie hat Saxophon, Komposition und Musikwissenschaft in Leipzig, Paris und Köln studiert. Ihr Reisen und Leben in Deutschland, Frankreich, Dänemark, Palästina und Brasilien hat sie für verschiedene künstlerische und sozio-kulturelle Projekte inspiriert. Sie interessieren die Arbeit im Kollektiv, politische, soziale und ästhetische Betrachtung von Musik und das Wissen aus unterschiedlichen Kunst-, Praxis- und Lebensbereichen. (luisevolkmann.jimdofree.com/)

Für Ella O’Brien-Coker sind die verschiedenen Rollen, die ihre Identität ausmachen immer eine Frage des Kontexts. Als Sängerin/Lyrikerin/Rapperin mit verschiedenen Bands und Projekten auf der Bühne und im Proberaum. Als Musikwissenschaftlerin und Autorin auf der Spur dessen, was zwischen den Zeilen steht. Als intersektionale Aktivistin einstehend für marginalisierte Positionen und engagiert in Community-Arbeit. Als Tochter und Schwester Teil eines komplexen Familienzusammenhangs, der die Grundlage für alle vorangegangenen Interessen darstellt. Und nicht zuletzt als Ella einfach all diese Dinge gleichzeitig und noch ein wenig mehr. (facebook.com/ellaobc/)

16:30:
Panel 3
Exportieren wir eigentlich nur Musik oder auch unsere Weltsicht?

  • Constanze Schliebs
  • Therese Hueber (Goethe-Institut)
  • Sylvia Freydank (IMD)
  • Moderation: Sophie Emilie Beha

— abstract: —

Im abschließenden Panel fragen wir danach, welchen Einfluss unsere Eigen- und Fremdsicht auf den Dialog mit “der Welt” hat. Wir haben dazu Constanze Schliebs eingeladen, die über viele Jahre Agenturerfahrung im In- und Ausland verfügt, außerdem als Kuratorin und Festivalgründerin in China aktiv war und ist, Sophie-Therese Hueber vom Musikbereich des Goethe-Instituts, sowie Sylvia Freydank vom Internationalen Musikinstitut Darmstadt (Ferienkurse für Neue Musik), Institutionen, bei denen ähnliche Diskussion ebenfalls seit längerem geführt werden (Moderation: Sophie Emilie Beha). Und wir fragen etwas provokant: “Exportieren wir eigentlich nur Musik oder auch unsere Weltsicht?”

— bios: —

Constanze Schliebs, Sinologin mit Schwerpunkt Peking Oper, seit 24 Jahren als Konzertagentin und Kuratorin selbständig. Neben Booking und  Tournee Organisation in Europa und Asien auch Künstlermanagement. Künstlerische Leitung Tränenpalast und blueNites Festival 1999-2001, Festivalgründerin Jazz Improvise Meeting China, Kuratorin Jazzoffensive Potsdam. (asianetwork.de)

Therese Hueber hat Musikwissenschaft, Musikpädagogik und Ethnologie studiert. Nach Tätigkeiten am Institut für Musikwissenschaft der LMU und in einer PR-Agentur in München betreut sie seit 2011 in der Zentrale des Goethe-Instituts die Förderprogramme im Bereich Musik. (goethe.de)

Sylvia Freydank, in Dresden geboren, studierte Musikwissenschaft, Kunstgeschichte und Sprachwissenschaft in Dresden, Genf und Berlin. Nach verschiedenen Stationen bei Festivals, beim Musikverlag Schott und als freie Autorin ist sie seit 2014 wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin im Team des Internationalen Musikinstituts Darmstadt (IMD) mit Schwerpunkt Projektentwicklung, künstlerische Planung und Kommunikation, u. a. für die Darmstädter Ferienkurse. (https://internationales-musikinstitut.de/de/imd/ueber/team/sylvia-freydank/)

Sophie Emilie Beha ist Musikjournalistin. Sie moderiert Radiosendungen, Konzerteinführungen, Podiumsdiskussionen und Livestreams. Daneben schreibt sie Texte für verschiedene Fachmagazine und Zeitungen und managt Social-Media-Kanäle. (https://twitter.com/sophiemiliebeha?lang=de)


Das 17. Darmstädter Jazzforum wird gefördert von 

LEONEsauvage

[:de]

1. Oktober 2021, 20:00 Uhr

Kathrin-Preis 2021

Preisverleihung und Preisträgerinnenkonzert in der Bessunger Knabenschule
Ludwigshöhstraße 142, 64285 Darmstadt

Eine Veranstaltung im Rahmen des 17. Darmstädter Jazzforums

Roots | Heimat: Wie offen ist der Jazz?

LEONEsauvage

Aufmunternde Worte, Träumen vom Kollektiv, lebensbejahende, kämpferische Hymnen und eine schillernde Mixtur aus Spektakel, Ritual und ausuferndem Getöse posaunt Luise Volkmann mit ihrer Free Jazz Big Band LEONEsauvage heraus.

Das zehnköpfige Ensemble LEONEsauvage ist tatsächlich wild. Träumen von einer Welt, in der Musik ihren Zuhörer:innen das gibt, was ihnen im Leben fehlt: einen Moment der Freiheit, ein Ritual des Loslassens und Ausrastens, ein Zelebrieren von Kreativität und Erfindungsgeist, als Mittel gegen die harte Realität. Und natürlich auch die Gemeinschaft, gegen die Einsamkeit des Einzelnen. Zusammen sind wir stark!

Luise Volkmann | Altsaxofon, Jan Frisch | Stimme, Gitarre, Matthew Halpin | Tenorsaxofon, Connie Trieder | Querflöte, Florian Walter | Baritonsaxofon, Matthias Muche | Posaune, Heidi Bayer | Trompete, Keisuke Matsuno | Gitarre, Florian Herzog | Kontrabass, Dominik Mahnig | Schlagzeug

Luise Volkmann erhält den Kathrin-Preis 2021. Die Kölner Saxofonistin und Komponistin, präsentiert nun mit LEONEsauvage ein zweites Large Ensemble, das in der Tradition des Free Jazz steht. Ganz anders als ihr dreizehnköpfiges Ensemble Été Large, basiert die Musik von LEONEssauvage zu großen Teilen auf kollektiver Improvisation. Ihre Kompositionen tragen Titel wie “Preacher” oder “The Cool” und weisen hiermit auf die unterschiedlichen Charaktere in der Band hin, die Volkmann bewusst theatral inszeniert. Es geht um die Persönlichkeit des einzelnen Spielers und darum, wie sich diese einzelnen Farben zu einem gemeinsamen Klang zusammenfügen. Einem Klang, der von Hymnen gespickt ist, die proklamieren: Dreams To Come.

Die Idee zu dem Projekt LEONEsauvage kam Volkmann 2016 in Paris. “Paris ist ein hartes Pflaster: Es gibt viel Obdachlosigkeit auf er Straße. 2016 waren auch immer wieder große Boulevards von Flüchtlingen überschwemmt, die mitten in der Stadt kampierten. Die Stadt ist teuer, Raum ist knapp, die Möglichkeiten zu gestalten sind knapp, die Leute arbeiten hart und vereinsamen. Deswegen wollte ich einen Moment etablieren, der die Pariser für eine kurze Zeit von ihrem Alltag befreit. Kurz ausrasten, frei sein und Kraft in der Gemeinschaft tanken, sich der Härte des Alltags entgegen zu setzen.” Darauf gründete sie die erste Version von LEONEsauvage mit jungen Musiker:nnen aus Paris. Inspiriert von Sun Ra’s Arkestra, arbeitete das Ensemble an einer mitreißenden Bühnenperformance: Die Musiker:nnen arbeiteten mit Bewegungs-Cues, auffallender Schminke und ließen sich mehrere Male von Schauspieler:innen coachen. Auf der Bühne standen sie immer mit unterschiedlichen Tänzer:innen aus dem Bereich des Zeitgenössischen Tanzes oder des Street Dance.

“Ich habe meine Bachelor-Arbeit über Sun Ra geschrieben und war beeindruckt, wie ganzheitlich er gearbeitet hat. Er hat es meiner Meinung nach geschafft, ein ganzes Konstrukt einer alternativen Welt zu bauen. Mit dieser Errungenschaft wollte ich mich solidarisieren mit LEONEsauvage und ein Ensemble bilden, dass auch politische und soziale Aussagen treffen kann.”

Haltung hat das Ensemble: In dem Stück Hymne pour LEONEsauvage schreien die jungen Musiker dem Hörer entgegen: “Kill your darlings, live the kitsch. We dance down our creed. There’s too many walls ’round here. Dreams to come, dreams to come. Wild and untamed blowers, yarning, fragile heads. All to make, all to give. Free the music we give.” Es ermutigt also zum zerbrechlich sein, zum authentisch sein, dazu äußere Zwänge in uns selbst aufzulösen und mit Hilfe der Musik freier zu werden. Hymne pour LEONEsauvage war sozusagen das Gründungsstück der Band.

In dem Stück Preacher singt der Sänger “Let us live an innocent thought of companionship” oder “Revolt against the negation of love” und spricht damit ein Thema an, dass Volkmann sehr am Herzen liegt: Die Gemeinschaft. “Wie gesagt hat mich die starke Vereinsamung in Paris immer traurig gemacht. Ich hab immer gelernt, dass man zusammen stärker ist. Das Ensemble LEONEsauvage haben wir auch versucht, als Kollektiv zu organisieren. Das hat manchmal besser, manchmal weniger gut geklappt. Aber auf jeden Fall haben die Konzerte immer eine unheimliche Kraft entfaltet. Ich hatte immer das Gefühl, die ganze Band hat sich wochenlang danach gesehnt, sich fix und fertig zu spielen. Da konnte man die Kraft der Gemeinschaft immer spüren und das Publikum war mitgerissen. Ich hab immer gescherzt und gesagt- meine Free-Jazz-Tanzband”.

Bis ins Jahr 2018 spielte das Ensemble in Paris fast monatlich. Als Volkmann im selben Jahr nach Kopenhagen zog, gründete sie dort die zweite Besetzung von LEONEsauvage, mit der auch die Aufnahmen zu dem Album entstanden. In Kopenhagen traf sie am Rhythmischen Musikkonservatorium auf eine buntes und internationales Konglomerat aus Musiker:innen. Die beiden Sänger der CD sind der portugiesische Jazz- und Popsänger João Neves und der isländische Rocker Hrafnkell Flóki Kaktus Einarsson. Zusammen bilden sie ein stimmungsvolles Duo, das genug Kante und Unschärfe zulässt, die diese Musik braucht. Die vier Saxophonist:innen des Ensembles kommen aus Polen, Deutschland und Argentinien und bilden zusammen einen gewaltigen Klangkörper. Die Rhythmusgruppe besteht aus Jazz- und Improvisationsmusikern aus Frankreich, Italien, Polen und Norwegen. Eine international besetzte Truppe, die zum Tanzen und Ausrasten einlädt.

Tatsächlich wird es dieses Jahr passend zur Veröffentlichung des Albums auch die deutsche Version des Ensembles geben. “Ich denke mit dem Projekt extra megaloman. Die Idee von LEONEsauvage soll die Welt infiltrieren.” Luise Volkmann gewann 2020 den Kathrin-Lemke-Preis des Jazzinstitut Darmstadt und konnte mithilfe des Preises eine dritte Besetzung aus vorwiegend in NRW lebenden Musiker:innen gründen. Und nicht nur das: Sie konnte in der Residenz in Darmstadt auch weiter zu dem Thema forschen, dass sie im Bezug auf den Free Jazz und Sun Ra interessiert. “Wie gehe ich als deutsche Jazzmusikerin mit dem Erbe der afro-amerikanischen Kultur um? Ich glaube es gibt viel zu wenig Diskurse über diese Frage. Ich bin von der Form der Musik von Sun Ra oder auch dem Art Ensemble of Chicago sehr berührt und möchte mich solidarisieren, möchte davon lernen und möchte vielleicht sogar einen Teil dieser Tradition fortführen. Es ist gar nicht so einfach, dafür den richtigen Ton zu treffen.” Das Jazzinstitut forscht bei seinem diesjährigen Symposium zu Eurozentrismus und bietet hier Luise Volkmann die Möglichkeit die langjährige Arbeit mit dem Ensemble und ihre Nachforschung zum Free Jazz und afro-amerikanischer Musik zu präsentieren.

Das Album „Dreams To Come” kommt gerade zur richtigen Zeit und setzt der schwierigen und komplexen Zeit, die hinter uns liegt, Optimismus und Aktivismus entgegen. “Ich sehe die Musik im Herzen der Gesellschaft. Ich glaube daran, dass Kreativität das Mittel ist, mit dem man Umbrüche meistern kann und mit der das Leben noch lebenswerter und bunter wird.”

 


Konferenz:
Von Donnerstag, 30. September, bis Samstag, 2. Oktober 2021, diskutieren wir über “Roots | Heimat: Wie offen ist der Jazz?” (mehr…)


Exhibition:
From 4 October 2021 the gallery of the Jazzinstitut shows the exhibition "Jazz Stories in Red and Blue" with posters created by Swiss artist and jazz promoter Niklaus Troxler. Some posters will be shown at the conference venue during the Jazzforum. (more...)

If you have any further questions, fee free to write us at jazz@jazzinstitut.de


Das 17. Darmstädter Jazzforum wird gefördert von 

[:en]1 October 2021, 8:00pm
Concert at Bessunger Knabenschule (Ludwigshöhstraße 142, 64285 Darmstadt)
This concert is part of the 17th Darmstadt Jazzforum about “Roots | Heimat: Wie offen ist der Jazz?”

LEONEsauvage

Uplifting words, dreams of the collective, life-affirming, combative hymns and a dazzling mixture of spectacle, ritual and sprawling bluster trumpeted out by Luise Volkmann and her free jazz big band LEONEsauvage.

The ten-piece ensemble LEONEsauvage is indeed a wild one. Dreaming of a world where music gives its listeners what they lack in life: a moment of freedom, a ritual of letting go and letting loose, a celebration of creativity and inventiveness, all of this a remedy against the harsh reality. And of course, community, which helps against the loneliness of the individual. Together we are strong!

Line-up: Luise Volkmann | altosax, leader, Jan Frisch | voice, guitar, Sebastian Gille | tenorsax, Connie Trieder | flute, Florian Walter | baritonsax, Matthias Muche | trombone, Heidi Bayer | trumpet, Keisuke Matsuno | guitar, Florian Herzog | bass, Dominik Mahnig | drums

Luise Volkmann is a Cologne-based saxophonist and composer who now presents LEONEsauvage, her second large ensemble in the free jazz tradition. Quite different from her thirteen-piece ensemble Été Large, LEONEssauvage’s music is largely based on collective improvisation. Their compositions bear titles such as “Preacher” or “The Cool”, thus pointing to the different characters in the band, which Volkmann deliberately stages theatrically. It is about the personality of the individual player and how these individual colors come together to form a common sound. A sound peppered with hymns that proclaim: Dreams To Come.

Volkmann got the idea for the LEONEsauvage project in Paris in 2016. “Paris is a tough place: There is a lot of homelessness on the streets. In 2016, large boulevards were also repeatedly flooded with refugees camping out in the middle of the city. The city is expensive, space is scarce, opportunities to create are scarce, people work hard and become lonely. That’s why I wanted to establish a moment that would free Parisians from their daily lives, and if only for a short time. To briefly escape, to be free, and to gather strength in community, to confront the harshness of everyday life.” These ideas, then made her found the first version of LEONEsauvage with young musicians from Paris. Inspired by Sun Ra’s Arkestra, the ensemble worked out a rousing stage performance: the musicians worked with movement cues, eye-catching make-up and had actors coach them several times. On stage they were always accompanied by different dancers from the field of contemporary dance or street dance.

“I wrote my bachelor’s thesis on Sun Ra and was impressed by how holistically he worked. He managed, in my opinion, to build a whole construct of an alternative world. It is an achievement I wanted to show solidarity with by forming LEONEsauvage as an ensemble that could also make political and social statements.”

The ensemble certainly has a wider attitude: In the piece “Hymne pour LEONEsauvage”, the young musicians scream at the listener: “Kill your darlings, live the kitsch. We dance down our creed. There’s too many walls ’round here. Dreams to come, dreams to come. Wild and untamed blowers, yarning, fragile heads. All to make, all to give. Free the music we give.” The song encourages being fragile, being authentic, dissolving external constraints in ourselves and becoming freer with the help of music”. Hymne pour LEONEsauvage” was, so to speak, the founding piece of the band.

In the track “Preacher”, the singer sings “Let us live an innocent thought of companionship” or “Revolt against the negation of love” and thus addresses a topic that is very close to Volkmann’s heart: Community. “As I said, the intense loneliness in Paris has always made me sad. I’ve always learned that you’re stronger together. We also tried to organize the ensemble LEONEsauvage as a collective. Sometimes it worked better, sometimes not so well. But in any case, the concerts have always unfolded an incredible power. I always had the feeling that the whole band had been longing to play for weeks. You could always feel the power of community and the audience was carried away. I always joked and called it ‘my free jazz dance band'”.

Until 2018, the ensemble played in Paris almost on a monthly basis. When Volkmann moved to Copenhagen that same year, she formed the second lineup of LEONEsauvage there, with whom she also recorded the album. In Copenhagen, she met a colorful and international conglomeration of musicians at the Rhythmic Music Conservatory. The two singers on the CD are Portuguese jazz and pop singer João Neves and Icelandic rocker Hrafnkell Flóki Kaktus Einarsson. Together they form an atmospheric duo that allows enough edge and fuzziness that this music needs. The ensemble’s four saxophonists come from Poland, Germany and Argentina, and together they form a formidable body of sound. The rhythm section consists of jazz and improvisational musicians from France, Italy, Poland and Norway. An international troupe that invites you to dance and go wild.

In fact, this year, to coincide with the release of the album, there will also be the German version of the ensemble. “I think with the project extra megalomaniac. The idea of LEONEsauvage is to infiltrate the world.” Luise Volkmann won the Jazzinstitut Darmstadt’s Kathrin-Preis in 2020 and, with the help of the award, could form a third lineup of musicians mainly living in Northrhine-Westfalia. But not only that: she could also continue her research on the topic, on free jazz and on Sun Ra during a residency in Darmstadt. “As a German jazz musician, how do I deal with the heritage of African-American culture? I think there is far too little discourse on this question. I am very touched by the form of the music of Sun Ra or also the Art Ensemble of Chicago and want to show solidarity, want to learn from it and maybe even want to continue a part of this tradition. It’s not so easy to strike the right note for that.” The Jazzinstitut’s fall conference in 2021 focuses on “Roots | Heimat”, and at the conference Luise Volkmann will have the opportunity to present her many years of work with the ensemble as well as her research on free jazz and African-American music.

The album “Dreams To Come” comes just at the right time, countering the difficult and complex times that lie behind us with optimism and activism. “I see music at the heart of society. I believe that creativity is the means by which you can master upheavals and with which life becomes even more livable and colorful.”

 

 


Conference:
From, Thursday, 30 September, through Saturday, 2 October 2021, we will be discussing about “Roots | Heimat: Wie offen ist der Jazz? (more…)


Exhibition:
From 4 October 2021 the gallery of the Jazzinstitut shows the exhibition “Jazz Stories in Red and Blue” with posters created by Swiss artist and jazz promoter Niklaus Troxler. Some posters will be shown at the conference venue during the Jazzforum. (more…)


If you have any further questions, fee free to write us at jazz@jazzinstitut.de


Das 17. Darmstädter Jazzforum wird gefördert von

[:]

[:de]Jazzgeschichten in Rot und Blau[:en]Jazz Stories in Red and Blue[:]

[:de]Niklaus Troxler / Grafische Kunst

Willisau ist ein kleines Schweizer Städtchen im Zentrum von Europa. Hier trifft sich seit Mitte der 1960er Jahre die wegweisende Internationale Jazz Avantgarde.

Der Schweizer Grafiker Niklaus Troxler ist der Name hinter den Konzerten und dem  legendären Willisau Jazz Festival. Über die Programmgestaltung hinaus hat er insbesondere mit seinen weltbekannten Plakatentwürfen dem Jazz in Willisau sein einzigartiges  künstlerisches Gesicht gegeben. Es ist ein weltumspannendes /kulturübergreifendes  geprägtes Gesamtkunstwerk aus Musik, Kunst und Performing, das Niklaus Troxler seit Mitte der 1960er Jahre in Willisau entwickelt hat.

The exhibition “Jazzgeschichten in Rot und Blau” nähert sich anhand von grafischen Werken dem ästhetischen Verständnis von Niklaus Troxlers, der den Jazz als Anregung für innovative grafische Ansätze nutzt. Für diese Ausstellung hat er dem Jazzinstitut  viele noch wenig gezeigte Plakate auch in kleinerem Format zur Verfügung gestellt.

Niklaus Troxlers Plakate stehen für Gebrauchskunst mit Kultcharakter. Er übersetzt den Jazz und die Begegnungen mit den Musiker:innen  in seine eigene Bildwelt, die durch Farben, Formen und Typografie geprägt ist. In unzähligen Variationen seiner sehr variantenreichen Bildsprache versucht er das für ihn Typische in der Musik einzufangen. So werden Instrumente zu Symbolen, Buchstaben zu Umrissen, Formen und Farben zu Bewegungsmustern. Denn alles was Niklaus Troxler am Jazz spannend findet, fasziniert ihn auch am Bild: die Mischung aus Komposition und Offenheit und damit auch die Improvisation und der Zufall.

Gerade sein enger persönlicher Kontakt zu den Musiker:innen und der Musik inspirieren ihn immer wieder zu den unterschiedlichsten Stilistiken.  Es gibt nicht den typischen “Troxler-Stil”. Genau das macht seine Kunst zeitlos und besonders.

Und so bilden in seinem Œuvre auch das kleine Heimatdorf “Willisau” ganz natürlich mit der New Yorker Free Music Szene eine künstlerische Einheit.


Ausstellung
4. Oktober bis 31. Dezember 2021 in der Galerie des Jazzinstituts Darmstadt
geöffnet Mo, Di, Do 10 -17 Uhr, Fr 10 -14 Uhr (bitte melden Sie sich an!)



Das 17. Darmstädter Jazzforum wird gefördert von

[:en]Niklaus Troxler / Graphic art

Willisau is a small Swiss town in the center of Europe. It is also the place where the pioneering international jazz avant-garde has been meeting since the mid-1960s.

Swiss graphic designer Niklaus Troxler is the name behind the concerts and the legendary Willisau Jazz Festival. Beyond the program design, he has given jazz in Willisau its unique artistic face, especially with his world-famous poster designs. It is a global/cross-cultural shaped synthesis of music, art and performing that Niklaus Troxler has developed in Willisau since the mid-1960s.

The exhibition “Jazz Stories in Red and Blue” uses graphic works to focus on Niklaus Troxler’s aesthetic understanding of jazz as a stimulus for innovative graphic approaches. For this exhibition, he has provided the Jazzinstitut with many rarely shown posters, in bigger as well as in smaller formats.

Niklaus Troxler’s posters stand for commercial art with cult character. He translates jazz and the encounters with the musicians into his own visual world, which is characterized by colors, shapes and typography. In countless variations of his varied visual language, he tries to capture what is typical for him in the music. Thus instruments become symbols, letters become outlines, shapes and colors become patterns of movement. The reason behind this: everything that Niklaus Troxler finds exciting about jazz also fascinates him about the picture: the mixture of composition and openness and thus also improvisation and chance.

It is precisely his close personal contact with the musicians and the music that inspires him time and again to create in differerent styles. Thus, there is no typical “Troxler style”. Perhaps it is this fact that makes his art timeless and special.

And so, in his œuvre, his small hometown of “Willisau” naturally forms an artistic unity with the New York free music scene.


Exhibition

30 September through 2 October 2021 during the conference at the conference venue

4 October through 31 December 2021 at the Jazzinstitut Darmstadt’s gallery
open: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday 10am-5pm, Friday 10am-2pm


Conference:
From, Thursday, 30 September, through Saturday, 2 October 2021, we will be discussing about “Roots | Heimat: Wie offen ist der Jazz? (more…)


Concert:
On Friday evening, 1 October 2021, Luise Volkmann and LEONE sauvage at Bessunger Knabenschule. (more…)


If you have any further questions, fee free to write us at jazz@jazzinstitut.de[:]

Roots | Heimat: Wie offen ist der Jazz?

Darmstadt Jazzforum 2021

All papers and panels can be viewed at the Jazzinstitut's YouTube channel

The 17th Darmstadt Jazzforum which has taken place from September 30 through October 2, 2021, asked about the sometimes unclear relationship between "roots" and "Heimat", the loaded German word signifying "home", "home country", "home culture" and much more. Roots stands for the African-American origin of jazz that resonates even in the most advanced experiments of contemporary improvisation. Heimat stands for the fact that jazz in particular always demands a cultural and aesthetic self-localization. For some, jazz is a creative practice used globally, but always pointing back to its African-American origins. For others, jazz is something they grew up with, something that allows them to express their own concerns and individual point of view better than most other genres. For many, jazz is both, containing the African-American tradition just as much as the productive freedom to apply this practice outside of its original community connecedness.

All of that is what we wanted to talk about. We continued discussions prompted by the Black Lives Matter movement about the idea of “Europe” which had a lasting influence on aesthetics and ethics, the presentation and the reception of jazz. We ask how a possibly Eurocentric perspective has changed and continues to shape our perception of what jazz stands for, how it connects both to the music’s African American origins and to our own individual cultural environment. Even if our discussions may have started with the name “jazz”, we did look at historical examples of Eurocentric tendencies, and we took into account the current discourse about the relevance of jazz in non-African American communities. We talked about racism in jazz, reflected on how exclusion and different forms of othering are present in today’s jazz scene, and looked at alternate readings of how the example of African American culture has changed and enriched the understanding of music all over the world. We didn't want to limit the discussion to jazz but also looked at similar debates about Eurocentrism or African-Americanism in contemporary composed music or pop culture.

The Darmstadt Jazzforum is an international conference aimed at a more general than just the scholarly community. We present papers that spur on discussions beyond the limits of jazz research, and we welcome an audience of musicians, journalists, dedicated jazz fans as much as students and scholars from different fields.


The Jazzinstitut Darmstadt organizes the Darmstadt Jazzforum with the support of the City of Sciences Darmstadt. In 2021 it is held in co-operation with HoffART-Theater Darmstadt and the Bessunger Knabenschule. The 17th Darmstadt Jazzforum is funded by the Kulturfonds FrankfurtRhein-Main and by the Hessian Ministery for the Sciences and the Arts. It is presented by Jazzthetik - Zeitschrift für Jazz und anderes.


Summary of the program:

Thursday, 30 September 2021, from 2:00pm
Diskussion – 17. Darmstädter Jazzforum Roots/Heimat (Foto: Wilfried Heckmann)

How is cultural identity formed and how is its perception influenced?
On the first day of the 17th Darmstadt Jazzforum conference we will ask how cultural identity is expressed in music or how it is perceived or not perceived in music. Philipp Teriete will talk about the educational canon at Historically Black Colleges and Universities in the USA in the late 19th and early 20th century and discuss the influence of this kind of music education on early jazz. Anna-Lisa Malmros discusses the very different identities of Danish-Congolese saxophonist John Tchicai, who has also been identified with the U.S. free jazz scene at least since his participation in some of its most prominent recordings in the 1960s.

Welcome-Dinner – 17. Darmstädter Jazzforum Roots/Heimat (Foto: Wilfried Heckmann)

The following conversation with saxophonist Gabriele Maurer, double bassist Reza Askari, and vocalist Simin Tander [t.b.c.] will also discuss issues of identity, namely present the very personal experiences of artists who have been affected in different ways, by skin color, family background, and/or their artistic engagement with traditions that lie outside their German homeland (moderated by Sophie Emilie Beha). We have titled this panel: "About being a stranger, arriving, yet staying a stranger. Conversation about one's own experience of identity perception".

Friday, 1 October 2021, from 09:30am
Ádám Havas – 17. Darmstädter Jazzforum Roots/Heimat (Foto: Wilfried Heckmann)

Cultural appropriation and national self-image (case studies)
In the morning session of the second conference day we will talk about the often very personal process of appropriation of African-American music in Europe. Philipp Schmickl will present the example of the Austrian Hans Falb, who met African-American trumpeter Clifford Thornton in Paris in 1978 and then planned concerts for and with Thornton in his hometown in eastern Austria, which eventually resulted in an internationally acclaimed festival. He questions the motivations behind Falb's curatorial activity and relates them to Thornton's views on music and politics of the time.

Pausentalk – 17. Darmstädter Jazzforum Roots/Heimat (Foto: Wilfried Heckmann)

Ádám Havas refers to a 2002 statement by Bruce Johnson ("Jazz was not simply 'invented' and then exported. It was invented in the process of its own dissemination") and applies it to the reception of jazz in Hungary, which has been very consciously drawing on cultural practices of Roma musicians living in Hungary.

Finally, Niklaus Troxler, whose posters are the subject of a special exhibition at the Jazzinstitut, will talk about his own path to jazz, as a fan, as the founder and longtime organizer of the Willisau Jazz Festival, with which he was able to bring many of the musicians to Switzerland whose music he adored, and as an internationally renowned graphic artist.

Friday, 1 October 2021, from 2:00pm
Sophie Emilie Beha, Frieder Blume, Joana Tischkau, Jean-Paul Bourelly, Konnie Vossebein
Panel 2: An die Arbeit – 17. Darmstädter Jazzforum Roots/Heimat (Foto: Wilfried Heckmann)

"Us" and "the others"
The much-postulated "emancipation" of European jazz in the 1950s and 1960s from U.S. (and thus especially African-American) models often led to an attitude of "we have to do something of our own," which - mostly unconsciously rather than consciously - led to the perception that jazz produced by European musicians had become something quite different from what was happening in the United States. Harald Kisiedu questions these perceptions, discusses the important Afro-Diasporic contributions to European experimental jazz and the admiration of African-American heroes that has always existed in the jazz scene, as examples for cultural creolization. Timo Vollbrecht has long been active as a saxophonist on the New York music scene, and also tours Germany and Europe with different bands. He has asked fellow musicians about their experiences with "social othering" and the exoticization of their person/art/music and, based on this, discusses possible strategies for each artist to achieve social justice in the music community.

Luise Volkmann LEONEsauvage – 17. Darmstädter Jazzforum Roots/Heimat (Foto: Wilfried Heckmann)

Trumpeter Stephan Meinberg asks about how to deal with one's own privileges as a person perceived as "white" who as a professional, e.g. practicing musician furthermore works mostly with African-American music.

In a roundtable with guitarist Jean-Paul Bourelly, concert promoter Kornelia Vossebein and cultural activists Joana Tischkau and Frieder Blume, we will finally discuss what is needed to contribute not only to a change in consciousness, but also to a different representation of musicians on stage (moderator: Sophie Emilie Beha). We have optimistically titled this panel: "Get to work: change reality!!!"

Saturday, 2 October 2021, from 09:30am
Peter Kemper – 17. Darmstädter Jazzforum Roots/Heimat (Foto: Wilfried Heckmann)

Of folks and people (case studies)
Identity is on the one hand something very personal, but on the other hand it is often perceived differently from the outside than by oneself. This is the subject of the morning session of the third conference day, which collects some very specific, yet quite different examples . Nico Thom talks about Bill Ramsey, the white U.S. American who (in addition to a career in German "Schlager") was celebrated in the German jazz scene of the 1950s as the "man with the black voice", discussing aspects of the "Americanization of Europe, in which 'postwar Western European societies actively participated in Americanization with strategic self-interests and skillful appropriation strategies.'"

Vincent Bababoutilabo + Wolfram Knauer – 17. Darmstädter Jazzforum Roots/Heimat (Foto: Wilfried Heckmann)

Focusing on a concert at Deutsches Jazz Festival in 1978, in which saxophonist Heinz Sauer shared the stage with Archie Shepp and George Adams, Peter Kemper examines the developmental of both Shepp's and Sauer's musical approaches and asks about aesthetic qualities of jazz that may transcend ethnic, geographical and national identities. Like an introduction to the afternoon session, Vincent Bababoutilabo emphasizes the need for perspectives critical of racism in music education today and in this country (Germany).

All abstracts for Saturday

Saturday, 2 October 2021, from 02:00pm, ab 14:00 Uhr
Luise Volkmann + Ella O’Brien-Coker – Vortrag beim 17. Darmstädter Jazzforum Roots/Heimat (Foto: Wilfried Heckmann)

How we view the world
Each of us is responsible for our own perspective. Perspectives, however, are not a default, they can be changed. The last afternoon of the Jazzforum is about such changes of perspective. We start the afternoon with a presentation by Berlin-based musicians Sanni Lötzsch and Jo Wespel. They will introduce their concept FESTIVAL BOOST NOW!, which is meant to be a call for self-empowerment of musicians on the one hand and for the creation of "fundamental openness" within all culture communities on the other. Their radical concept demands an approach towards queerfeminist, intersectional, anti-rassist, and interdisciplinary teamwork within the artistic process, as well as the re-formation of cultural structures. With their "Meta-Community" they not only develop multiperspective event formats, but also create holistic "Realutopien" (real world utopias), as they call it.

Saxophonist Luise Volkmann received the Kathrin-Preis awarded by the Jazzinstitut in April 2021, which came with a week-long residency in Darmstadt, during which she conducted research on Sun Ra, the African diaspora, the Black Atlantic, the socio-musical and political influence of music. At the same time, she met for the first time with the musicians of her latest LEONEsauvage band, which will be heard on Friday evening at the Darmstadt Jazzforum, and discussed with them subjects such as the African-American diaspora and how we as Europeans deal with it. In her own contribution and then in conversation with singer-songwriter Ella O'Brien-Coker, Volkmann will discuss aspects of rituality, our many identities and performative speech. In the concluding panel, we ask what influence our own and others' views have on our dialogue with "the world".

We have invited Constanze Schliebs, who has many years of experience as a booking agent in Germany and abroad and has also been active as a curator and festival founder in China, Sophie-Therese Hueber from the music department of the Goethe-Institut, and Sylvia Freydank from Internationales Musikinstitut Darmstadt (Summer Courses for New Music), institutions where similar discussions have been going on for some time (moderator: Sophie Emilie Beha). And we ask somewhat provocatively, "Do we actually just export music or also our worldview?"


Concert:
On Friday evening, 1 October 2021, Luise Volkmann and LEONE sauvage at Bessunger Knabenschule. (more...)


Exhibition:
From 4 October 2021 the gallery of the Jazzinstitut shows the exhibition "Jazz Stories in Red and Blue" with posters created by Swiss artist and jazz promoter Niklaus Troxler. Some posters will be shown at the conference venue during the Jazzforum. (more...)


If you have any further questions, fee free to write us at jazz@jazzinstitut.de


Das 17. Darmstädter Jazzforum wird gefördert von

POSITIONEN! Jazz und Politik

Sorry, but this page is only available in German.


Verantwortung! Relevanz! Widerstand! Jazz? Lasst uns diskutieren…

Jazz wurde immer als eine Musik der Widerständigkeit wahrgenommen. Mit dem Einzug in die Institutionen scheint der Jazz ein wenig seines politischen Bewusstseins verloren zu haben. Musiker*innen beschäftigen sich mehr mit technischen und ästhetischen Fragen; das Publikum sonnt sich eher im vergleichenden Blick zurück, als dass es seine Aufmerksamkeit dem oft schwierigeren – und das nicht immer, weil die Musik schwierig ist –, aber solidarischen Blick nach vorn widmet.

Und während in den USA, dem Geburtsland des Jazz, fast jedes Projekt eine politische Note erhält, von Vijay Iyer bis Kamasi Washington, scheint Europa im selbstgefälligen Feiern von Jazz als Kunstmusik versunken. In Zeiten, in denen in ganz Europa die sozialen und politischen Errungenschaften der letzten Jahrzehnte von einem neuen Populismus zurückgedrängt werden, befasst sich aber auch die Kunst insgesamt wieder verstärkt mit gesellschaftlichen Themen, sei es die bewusstere Haltung gegenüber Klimafragen, Armut, Bildung, das globale Verständnis von Menschlichkeit, das Eintreten für die Menschenwürde auf allen Ebenen, eine klare Haltung gegen Sexismus, Rassismus oder sonstige Ausgrenzung. “Diversity”, sagt Kamasi Washington, “should not be tolerated, it should be celebrated.”

Wo also findet diese Feier der Diversität statt im zeitgenössischen europäischen Jazz? Wie ist es um das Bewusstsein für die eigene politische, gesellschaftliche und soziale Verantwortung des Künstlers im Jazz bestellt? Und warum scheint “politisch Lied” ausgerechnet in dem Genre, das die tiefste Geschichte der Widerständigkeit besitzt, immer noch “garstig Lied” zu sein?

Das 16. Darmstädter Jazzforum setzt sich mit diesen und ähnlichen Fragen auseinander, in Vorträgen, Diskussionspanels, Gesprächskonzerten, einem Workshop, einer Ausstellung zum Thema sowie einer abschließenden Buchdokumentation. Wir wollen den Jazz nicht bekehren. Nicht alles muss zuvorderst politisch sein. Im Wissen aber darum, dass auch in 2019 gilt, dass “alles politisch ist”, wollen wir mit Musiker*innen, Expert*innen und Wissenschaftler*innen darüber sprechen, ob nicht vielleicht gerade durch die immer präsente politische Kraft des Jazz, die Tatsache also, dass improvisierte Musik ein seismographisch ziemlich empfindliches Abbild der Gegenwart ist, dieser Musik auch 2019 and beyond ein besonders wichtiger Platz im Kanon der aktuellen Musik gebührt.

Der Konferenzteil des Darmstädter Jazzforums findet vom 3. bis 5. Oktober 2019 tagsüber im Literaturhaus Darmstadt statt. Mit den Konzerten, der Ausstellung und Workshops, mit denen wir die Konferenz flankieren, planen wir unterschiedliche Veranstaltungsorte in Darmstadt zu bespielen.

Weiter unten finden sich Abstracts der einzelnen Programmpunkte sowie Biographien der Referentinnen und Referenten. Unser gedruckter Programmflyer (hier als PDF) enthält einen kürzer gefassten Überblick über das 16. Darmstädter Jazzforum:

— — —

Programm (Stand: 29. Juli 2019)
“POSITIONEN! Jazz und Politik”

Donnerstag, 3. Oktober 2019

AUSSTELLUNG (ab 3. Oktober)

Vortragssaal im Literaturhaus + Galerie im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt

Alles wird gut gegangen sein werden – die Ausstellung

Im Künstlerkollektiv BRIGADE FUTUR III haben sich Benjamin Weidekamp, Elia Rediger, Jérôme Bugnon und Michael Haves zusammengetan, um zu Fragen und Herausforderungen unserer Zeit künstlerisch Stellung zu beziehen. Dabei reflektieren sie nichts Geringeres als den Zustand der Welt, die Auswüchse des Kapitalismus und vor allem auch die Möglichkeiten jedes einzelnen, sich in den Diskurs einzubringen.

Als Musiker transportieren sie ihr politisches Statement im Sinne von Brecht und Weill in vielen Konzerten und Bühnenprojekten, oft zusammen mit anderen Musikern und Künstlern wie der Spielvereinigung Sued aus Leipzig.

Auf Einladung des Jazzinstituts Darmstadt hat sich die BRIGADE FUTUR III der Aufgabe gestellt, ihre Ideen im Rahmen dieser Ausstellung für das 16. Darmstädter Jazzforum “Jazz und Politik” umzusetzen.

Alles wird gut gegangen sein werden… aber wie nur? Wie kann man für ein positives Zukunftsbild einstehen, dessen Voraussetzungen in der Zukunft erst “geschaffen zu sein werden haben?” Die Idee des fiktionalen Futur III war geboren, mit dem die Künstler einen kategorischen Handlungsimperativ verbinden, um ein positives gesellschaftliches Narrativ zu entwerfen, für das es sich zu leben lohnt.

Auf der Basis ihres “Kampfalphabets”, in dem Schrecken unseres gesellschaftlichen Systems mit Alternativen kontrastiert werden, verfolgen sie ihren konzeptionellen Kunstansatz mit Sendungsbewusstsein.

“Die verheerenden Auswirkungen des Raubtierkapitalismus auf die Welt werden immer deutlicher und es ist klar, dass es so nicht mehr weiter gehen kann.” BRIGADE FUTUR III

(wegen der Konferenz im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt öffentlich erst ab 7.10. zu sehen) 


KONFERENZ (Literaturhaus)

14:00 Uhr
Eröffnung

14:15 Uhr
Stephan Braese, Aachen
Stammheim war nie Attica. Zur politischen Widerständigkeit des Jazz in Deutschland seit 1945

Ungeachtet des eminenten Einflusses, den die US-amerikanischen Entwicklungen stets hatten, standen die Entfaltung, aber auch die politischen Wirkungschancen des Jazz in Deutschland stets unter spezifischen Bedingungen. Ausgehend von der (Wieder-)Einführung des Jazz 1945, skizziert der Vortrag einige dieser Bedingungen, zu denen die ethnische Homogenität der deutschen Bevölkerung, der Kampf um die Legitimität des Jazz, ein spezifisch europäischer Kunstbegriff, die (west-)deutsche Interpretation der antiautoritären Bewegung 1966 ff. u.a. gehören. Die Ausführungen stellen die Frage danach, ob und inwieweit diese in den Gründungsjahrzehnten des deutschen Jazz angelegten Dispositive auch im heutigen Verhältnis zwischen Jazz und Politik noch zu erkennen und wirksam sind.

Stephan Braese (geb. 1961) studierte Germanistik, Geschichte und Erziehungswissenschaft in Hamburg. Seit 2009 ist er Ludwig Strauss-Professor für europäisch-jüdische Literatur- und Kulturgeschichte an der RWTH Aachen University. Einschlägige Veröffentlichungen u.a.: “Identifying the Impulse: Alfred Lion Founds the Blue Note Jazz Label”, in Eckart Goebel and Sigrid Weigel (ed.): “Escape to Life” – German Intellectuals in New York: A Compendium of Exile after 1933 (Berlin/ Boston: de Gruyter, 2013): 270-287; “‘kenny clarke im club st-germain-des-prés’ – Zu einem Satz von Alfred Andersch”, in Corina Caduff, Anne-Kathrin-Reulecke, Ulrike Vedder (ed.): Passionen – Objekte/ Schauplätze/ Denkstile (München: Wilhelm Fink 2010): 309-316.

15:15 Uhr
Henning Vetter, Osnabrück
Jazz als politische Musik? Über die Selbstbestimmung des Künstlers über die Rezeption und Deutungshoheit seines Werkes

Spricht man über Politik in Verbindung mit Jazz, so impliziert diese Zusammenführung eine Positionierung des Künstlers und des Publikums gleichermaßen. Doch wie kann eine an sich abstrakte Musik Haltung zeigen, Aussagen treffen? Und: welche Aussagen kann sie überhaupt treffen? Der Vortrag nähert sich diesen Fragestellungen von einer praktischen Seite am Beispiel des Kollektivs “The Dorf”. Dabei geht es auch darum, wer bestimmt, wie die Musik aufgenommen wird und ob die Intention des Künstlers bezüglich der Bedeutung seines eigenen Werkes nicht sogar überflüssig sein kann.

Henning Vetter studierte Musikwissenschaft und Medienkulturwissenschaft an der Universität zu Köln. Seine Abschlussarbeit widmete er dem Bassisten Charles Mingus im Hinblick auf die politische Wirkung dessen musikalischen Werkes. Von 2017 bis 2019 studierte Henning Vetter am Institut für Musik der Hochschule Osnabrück Saxophon und gründete vor drei Jahren gemeinsam mit Freunden in Köln das PAO-Kollektiv für experimentelle und improvisierte Musik.

16:15 Uhr
Nina Polaschegg, Wien
Sind frei Improvisierende die besseren Demokraten?

Gerne werden Jazz und frei improvisierte Musik als demokratisches Gesellschaftsmodell einem hierarchisch aufgebauten Orchesterapparat gegenüber gestellt. Und ein Streichquartett, wo stünde dann dieses? Ob und wieweit solche Modelle tragfähig sind und inwieweit hier Wunsch und Wirklichkeit auseinander klaffen ist eine der Fragen, denen in diesem Vortrag nachgegangen wird. Um in einem Zeitraffer und knappen Rückblick in die Anfänge des Free Jazz politisch motivierte freie Musik im Hier & Jetzt zu beleuchten und dabei auch einen Blick in die Welt der komponierten zeitgenössischen Musik zu werfen. 

Nina Polaschegg studierte Musikwissenschaften, Soziologie und Philosophie in Giessen und Hamburg wo sie auch promovierte. Ihre Forschungsschwerpunkte liegen im Bereich der zeitgenössischen komponierten, improvisierten und elektronischen Musik sowie im zeitgenössischen Jazz und Musiksoziologie. Sie lebt als Musikwissenschaftlerin, Musikpublizistin, Moderatorin und Kontrabassistin in Wien, arbeitet für diverse öffentlich-rechtliche Rundfunkanstalten in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz und schreibt für verschiedene Fachzeitschriften. Hatte Lehraufträge an den Musikhochschulen bzw. Universitäten Hamburg und Klagenfurt. Als Kontrabassistin spielte sie historisch informiert in  Barockorchestern und widmet sich v.a. der (freien) Improvisation.

17:15 (bis 17:45) Uhr
Benjamin Weidekamp + Michael Haves, Berlin
Alles wird gut gegangen sein werden – Der Talk

Benjamin Weidekamp und Michael Alves sind Mitglieder der  Brigade Futur III, die beim Darmstädter Jazzforum nicht nur musikalisch aktiv werden (zusammen mit der Spielvereinigung Sued am Samstagabend), sondern auch eine Ausstellung in den Räumen des Jazzinstituts und des Literaturhauses Darmstadt zeigen, in der sie den künstlerischen Prozess ihrer kreativen (und immer auch politischen / gesellschaftlichen) Arbeit beleuchten. Darum geht es auch bei ihrem gemeinsamen Vortrag im Konferenzteil des Jazzforums, in dem sie über die Diskussionen um ihre Darmstädter Beiträge berichten werden.

— — —

Freitag, 4. Oktober 2019

AUSSTELLUNG (ab 3. Oktober)

Vortragssaal im Literaturhaus + Galerie im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt
Alles wird gut gegangen sein werden – die Ausstellung
(wegen der Konferenz im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt öffentlich erst ab 7.10. zu sehen)

KONFERENZ (Literaturhaus)

9:30 Uhr
Wolfram Knauer, Darmstadt
Jazz und Politik – politischer Jazz? Eine bundesdeutsche Perspektive

Wer in diesen Zeiten nicht politisch denkt und handelt, hat ein Problem: Die Krisen, von denen wir von allen Seiten bedrängt werden, fordern doch nachgerade Position zu beziehen. Anhand konkreter Beispiele diskutiert Wolfram Knauer die durchaus unterschiedlichen Erwartungshaltungen an die gesellschaftliche Relevanz von Musik. So fragt er beispielsweise, inwieweit wir uns nicht selbst belügen, wenn wir der Musik außermusikalische Kompetenz zusprechen und sie nach dieser bemessen. Zugleich hinterfragt er aber auch, inwieweit Musik unpolitisch sein kann oder sollte. Tun wir Musik nicht unrecht, wenn wir in ihr die Utopie suchen, die uns in unserem eigenen Handeln fehlt?

Wolfram Knauer ist Musikwissenschaftler und seit seiner Gründung Direktor des Jazzinstituts Darmstadt. Er lehrte an mehreren Universitäten und war als erster Nichtamerikaner Louis Armstrong Professor of Jazz Studies an der Columbia University. Er ist Herausgeber der Darmstädter Beiträge zur Jazzforschung und Autor zahlreicher wissenschaftlicher Beiträge in Büchern und Fachzeitschriften. Bei Reclam erschienen seine Bücher Louis Armstrong (2010), Charlie Parker (2014) und Duke Ellington (2017) sowie jüngst “Play yourself, man!” Die Geschichte des Jazz in Deutschland (2019).

Mario Dunkel, Oldenburg
Afrodiasporische Musik und Populismus in Europa

Dass populäre Musik und Jazz der Verhandlung von Identitätskonzepten dienen, ist keine neue Erkenntnis. Kategorien wie Nation, race, Ethnizität, Gender und Klasse sind seit den Anfängen des Jazz wichtige Diskursfelder, in denen die Musik verortet und verstanden wird. Die Beziehung zwischen Gruppenidentität und Musik ist insbesondere in der Interaktion zwischen aktueller populärer Musik und zeitgenössischen politischen Bewegungen signifikant. So greift die Alternative für Deutschland (AfD) auf Demonstrationen beispielsweise nicht nur auf deutschsprachige Volksmusik und Richard Wagners Walkürenritt zurück, sondern sie setzt auch populäre Musik mit eindeutigen afrodiasporischen Bezügen ein, wenn etwa Xavier Naidoos “Raus aus dem Reichstag” eine Demonstration gegen den Bau einer Moschee in Rostock musikalisch begleitet. Dieser Beitrag geht solchen Aneignungsstrategien von afrodiasporischen Musiken in gegenwärtigen politischen Bewegungen nach. Welche Funktion hat die Verwendung afrodiasporischer Musiken in diesen politischen Bewegungen in Europa? Warum wird die Verwendung afrodiasporischer Musiken in diesen Zusammenhängen nicht als widersprüchlich empfunden, wo sie doch die Forderung nach kultureller Homogenität zu karikieren scheint? Inwiefern kann die Aneignung afrodiasporischer Musiken als Bestandteil aktueller Identitätspolitiken in Europa verstanden werden?

Mario Dunkel studierte in Dortmund, Atlanta und New York Musik, Englisch und Amerikanistik. 2014 promovierte er mit einer Dissertation zu Darstellungen von Jazzgeschichte an der TU Dortmund. Er ist zurzeit Juniorprofessor für Musikpädagogik am Institut für Musik der Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg. Zu seinen Forschungsschwerpunkten zählen Konstruktionen und Darstellungen von Jazzgeschichte, Musik und Politik sowie transkulturelle Musikpädagogik. Zurzeit leitet er das internationale Forschungsprojekt „Popular Music and the Rise of Populism in Europe“ (2019-2022).

11:30 Uhr
Martin Pfleiderer, Weimar
“… an outstanding artistic model of democratic cooperation”? Zur Interaktion im Jazz

Glaubt man der Resolution des US-Kongresses aus dem Jahre 1987, so ist Jazz ein herausragendes künstlerisches Modell demokratischer Kooperation. Denn im Jazz, so die verbreitete Vorstellung, halten sich Gruppeninteraktion und individueller Ausdruck die Waage, und in seinen klanglichen Strukturen lassen sich die Prozesse gleichberechtigter Interaktion und Kooperation auch für Außenstehende nachvollziehen. Diese Vorstellungen sollen im Vortrag kritisch hinterfragt werden. Wie geht der interaktive Schaffensprozess im Jazz tatsächlich vonstatten? Welchen Stellenwert haben dabei einerseits körperliche Synchronisierungsprozesse zwischen den MusikerInnen, andererseits explizite Signale und Absprachen? Wird eine gleichberechtigte Interaktion nur inszeniert und auf der Bühne dargestellt, oder ist sie real und hat reale Konsequenzen? Welche Rolle spielen hierarchische Strukturen, Führerschaft und Autorität innerhalb von Jazzbands? Kann schon allein im Prozess des interaktiv-improvisatorischen Musikmachens ein politischer oder sogar utopischer Gehalt aufscheinen oder sind dafür zusätzlich bestimmte Symbole oder Musiker-Statements erforderlich? Neben musiksoziologischen und musikanalytischen Zugängen sollen zur Klärung dieser Fragen auch neuere Ansätze der ›embodied music interaction‹ und der Diskussion um musikalische ›agency‹ herangezogen werden.

Martin Pfleiderer (Jg. 1967) studierte Musikwissenschaft, Philosophie und Soziologie in Gießen und war 1999-2005 wissenschaftlicher Assistent für Systematische Musikwissenschaft an der Uni Hamburg. Seit 2009 ist er Professor für Geschichte des Jazz und der populären Musik am Institut für Musikwissenschaft Weimar-Jena. Er hat zahlreiche Aufsätze zum Jazz veröffentlicht und ist darüber hinaus leidenschaftlicher Jazzsaxophonist.

14:00 Uhr
Panel mit Nadin Deventer, Berlin | Tina Heine, Salzburg | Lena Jeckel, Gütersloh | Ulrich Stock, Hamburg
Veranstalter/innen: die Influencer des Jazz?

In diesem Panel wollen wir über die Strukturzwänge sprechen, in denen insbesondere große Jazzevents organisiert und wahrgenommen werden. Welche Aufgabe haben Kurator/innen über das reine Programmieren hinaus? Wie können Festivals oder Konzertreihen nachhaltig wirken, eine regionale Szene einbinden und zugleich im internationalen Diskurs des Jazz wahrgenommen werden? Welche Auswirkungen haben programmatische Entscheidungen auf die Diskussion innerhalb der gesamten bundesdeutschen Szene? Oder, und damit deutlicher auf unser Konferenzthema bezogen: Wie gehen Programmverantwortliche auf gesellschafts- und kulturpolitische Diskurse ein? Wollen sie das überhaupt oder müssen sie gegebenenfalls auf gesamtgesellschaftlich diskutierte Themen reagieren? Wie schließlich spiegeln sich ihre Programmentscheidungen in der öffentlichen Wahrnehmung wieder? Mit Tina Heine, Lena Jeckel und Nadin Deventer haben wir drei Programmverantwortliche auf dem Podium, die aus eigener Erfahrung über das Machbare genauso wie über das Wünschenswerte berichten können. Mit Ulrich Stock ist zudem ein Journalist dabei, der immer wieder über die Reaktion der Jazzszene auf aktuelle Fragen berichtet und die verschiedenen Orte erkundet, an denen diese gesellschaftlich-musikalische Auseinandersetzung zu erleben ist.

15:30 Uhr
Nikolaus Neuser + Florian Juncker, Berlin
“Occupied Reading”: Musikalische Intervention

Wie verändert die Lektüre politischer, ästhetischer oder sonstiger Texte die Wahrnehmung von Musik? Wie verändert Musik die Lektüre politischer, ästhetischer oder anderer Texte? Nikolaus Neuser und Florian Juncker machen die Probe aufs Exempel, und wir erfahren: Musik verändert das Denken, aber das Denken verändert auch die musikalische Wahrnehmung. Welchen Diskurs lassen solche intermedialen Erfahrungen entstehen? Und was lehren sie uns letzten Endes über den tatsächlichen Einfluss von Musik (oder Kunst im Allgemeinen) auf unser gesellschaftliches Denken und Handeln?

16:00 Uhr
Hans Lüdemann
“Beyond the underdog”. Gesellschaftliche und politische Positionierung eines deutschen Jazzmusikers heute (Vortrag live am Klavier / Lecture-Performance)

Hans Lüdemann erzählt, warum die politische Einstellung für ihn eine der wichtigen Motivationen war, überhaupt Jazzmusiker zu werden. Er fragt, welche Bedeutung eine politische Haltung in Bezug auf den Jazz heute hat, wie und worin sie sich ausdrücken kann. Am Klavier erklingen politisch gefärbte und gedeutete Musikstücke und es wird den Widersprüchen nachgespürt, die sich zwischen politischer Haltung und Botschaft einerseits und der abstrakten Welt der Töne andererseits auftun können. Aber auch die Positionierung und Behauptung des Musikers in der gesellschaftlichen Realität zwischen Kunst, Kommerz, Kulturförderung und Kapitalismus wird dabei mit ins Bild gerückt.

Hans Lüdemann ist Jazzpianist und Komponist. Er hat mit deutschen und internationalen Größen zusammengearbeitet wie Eberhard Weber, Heinz Sauer, Manfred Schoof, Angelika Niescier, Jan Garbarek und Paul Bley. Im Zentrum seiner Arbeit stehen jedoch eigene Projekte: er spielt Solokonzerte, zuletzt 2018 in China, im Trio ROOMS, arbeitet seit 20 Jahren mit dem afrikanischen Balaphon-Meister Aly Keita im TRIO IVOIRE zusammen und leitet das deutsch-französische Oktett „TransEuropeExpress“. Er erweitert das Klavier mit Samples in mikrotonale Bereiche, was in dem neuen Quartett mikroPULS mit Gebhard Ullmann, Oliver Potratz und Eric Schaefer besonders zur Geltung kommt. Hans Lüdemann hat über 30 Alben bei renommierten Labels veröffentlicht. Seine bisher umfangreichste Produktion, die CD – Box„die kunst des trios“, wurde 2013 mit dem „Echo Jazz“ ausgezeichnet. Lüdemann war von 1993 – 2008 Dozent für Jazz-Klavier und – Ensemble an der Musikhochschule Köln, 2009/2010 und 2015/16 Cornell Visiting Professor am Swarthmore College in Philadelphia/USA.

KONZERT (Centralstation Darmstadt)
20:00 Uhr

Anarchist Republic of Bzzz (FR/NL/TR/USA)

Seb El Zin, in Paris lebender Sänger der Ethno-Punk-Band ITHAK, gründete diese etwas andere Supergroup – musikalisch zwischen Impro-Avantgarde, Worldmusic und Slampoetry. Mehr Informationen zum Konzert

Das Konzert wird präsentiert von

Collage: Kiki Picasso©

— — —

Samstag, 5. Oktober 2019

AUSSTELLUNG (ab 3. Oktober)

Vortragssaal im Literaturhaus + Galerie im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt
Alles wird gut gegangen sein werden – die Ausstellung
(wegen der Konferenz im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt öffentlich erst ab 7.10. zu sehen)

KONFERENZ (Literaturhaus)

9:30 Uhr
Nikolaus Neuser, Berlin
Jazz und improvisierte Musik als soziales Rollenmodell?

Wir sind heute täglich in immer komplexere Zusammenhänge eingebunden, auf die wir in immer schnelleren Rückkopplungen reagieren müssen. Durch die Digitalisierung befinden wir uns sowohl technologisch als auch in unserer Kommunikation und Diskursfähigkeit in erheblichen Umbrüchen. Welche Kompetenzen und Modelle zukünftigen Miteinanders liefert uns die Kulturtechnik der Improvisation vor diesem Hintergrund? Nikolaus Neuser beleuchtet diese Fragestellung auch aus der konkreten Perspektive seiner kulturpolitischen Arbeit.

Nikolaus Neuser studierte an der Folkwang-Hochschule in Essen Trompete bei Uli Beckerhoff. Aktuell interpretiert er mit dem Trio I Am Three unkonventionell  besetzt die Musik von Charles Mingus. 2016 legte das Trio das international vielbeachtete Album Mingus Mingus Mingus (Leo Records) vor (Jahresbestenliste Downbeat Magazin, All about Jazz, NYC Jazz Records uva.). Er arbeitet außerdem im Trio mit Richard Scott und Alexander Frangenheim an elekroakkustischer improvisierter Musik und ist u.a. Mitglied der Ensembles Potsa Lotsa, Andreas Willers´ 7 of 8, des Hannes Zerbe Jazz Orchesters und des Berlin Improvisers Orchestra. Nikolaus Neuser hat mit Matthew Herbert, Matana Roberts, Tyshawn Sorey, Nate Wooley, Maggie Nicols, Peter Fox, Seeed sowie dem London Improvisers Orchestra u.v.a gearbeitet und ist auf über 50 CDs zu hören. Konzertreisen u.a. auf Einladung des Goethe Instituts führten ihn durch Europa, Asien, Nordafrika, die USA, in den Libanon, Jordanien, Saudi-Arabien sowie nach Kolumbien, wo er als Gastprofessor an der Pontificia Universidad Javeriana de Bogotá lehrte.

10:30 Uhr
Michael Rüsenberg, Köln
“Jazz ist stets politisch.” Stimmt diese Aussage von Mark Turner? Und, hört man sie in seiner Musik?

Im November 2016 (Donald Trump ist gerade gewählt), vermutet der amerikanische Saxophonist Mark Turner im Gespräch mit der NZZ, “dass es wieder zu einer Politisierung der Kunst kommen wird.” Das ist eine Überzeugung, die wie unter einem Brennglas den zentralen Inhalt des Politikverständisses weiter Teile der Jazzszene wiedergibt (s. Titel). “Allein schon der Entscheid, als Jazzmusiker zu leben, ist ein politisches Statement. Denn man entscheidet sich damit für Freiheit, für Emanzipation und gegen den Primat des materiellen Erfolgs” (Turner). Michael Rüsenberg unterzieht diese Position einer grundsätzlichen Kritik.

Michael Rüsenberg, geb 1948, Journalist, Buchautor, Gastgeber der philosophischen Gesprächsreihe “Gedankensprünge” in Bann. Adolf-Grimme-Preis 1989, WDR Jazzpreis 2015. Buchprojekt “Improvisation – ein Prinzip des Lebens” (in Vorbereitung)

11:30 Uhr
Thomas Krüger, Berlin

Der Beitrag von Kunst und Kultur, insbesondere des Jazz, für aktuelle gesellschaftspolitische Diskurse

In meinem Beitrag würde ich zunächst auf die Debatte um die Kulturalisierung des Politischen eingehen und aktuelle Tendenzen politischer Verschiebungen aufzeigen. Ich werde die kreative wie auch die rezeptive Seite von kulturellen Artefakten beleuchten und nach dem Politischen in der Ästhetik fragen. Und danach, was der Jazz, insbesondere der frei improvisierende Jazz in diesem Zusammenhang für ein Potential hat.

Thomas Krüger ist seit 2000 Präsident der Bundeszentrale für politischen Bildung. Seit 1995 ist er Präsident des Deutschen Kinderhilfswerkes. Außerdem ist er zweiter stellvertretender Vorsitzender der Kommission für Jugendmedienschutz und Mitglied des Kuratoriums für den Geschichtswettbewerb des Bundespräsidenten. 1991 bis 1994 war er Senator für Jugend und Familie in Berlin, 1994 bis 1998 Mitglied des Deutschen Bundestages.

14:00 Uhr
Angelika Niescier + Tim Isfort + Victoriah Szirmai + Korhan Erel
… im Ohr des Betrachters
(Lecture-Performance)

Der Ton: ein physikalisches Ereignis, ohne ästhetische noch politische Intention.
In der Wahrnehmung der Rezipienten wird „der Ton“ aber sofort kontextualisiert – eine essentielle Projektionsfläche für tatsächliche und irreale Intentionen, Botschaften und Diskursangebote. In dieser Lecture Performance mit Musiker*innen, Kurator*innen und Jornalist*innen werden unterschiedliche  Perspektiven des Themenclusters untersucht, um Überschneidungen, Unterschiede und mögliche Kontroversen zu verdeutlichen und um sich in der Diskussion dem Intendierten, Verstandenen und Missverstandenen und dem Phänomen des “Politischen” in der Musik zu nähern.

16:30 Uhr (programmkinorex Darmstadt)
Atef Ben Bouzid, Berlin

Cairo Jazzman – The Groove of a Megacity

“Jazz is more than just a style of music”, sagt Amr Salah. “It’s about freedom.” Salah, ägyptischer Pianist und Komponist, kämpft seit 2009 jedes Jahr darum, das Cairo Jazz Festival zu realisieren. Jazz ist zu seinem Lebensinhalt geworden, weil diese Musik in seinen Augen völkerverbindend ist und speziell der Jugend ein Sprachrohr gibt. Für Amr Salah handelt es sich um einen vielfältigen Musikstil, der damit auch für Liberalität und Offenheit einer Gesellschaft steht, für die es sich zu kämpfen lohnt. Atif Ben Bouzids Film über das Cairo Jazz Festival gibt ungewohnte und vielschichtige Einblicke in das Leben der Zivilgesellschaft in der Megacity Kairo, eingebettet im Jazz als einer universellen, völkerverbindenden und horizonterweiternden Sprache.
Mehr Informationen zum Film

Nach der Filmvorführung gibt es ein Filmgespräch mit dem Regisseur über Jazz und zivilgesellschaftlicher Aktivismus in der arabischen Welt.

Atef Ben Bouzid ist ein deutscher Journalist, Regisseur und Produzent aus Berlin mit dem Fokus auf Sport, Musik und Gesellschaft. “Cairo Jazzman” ist sein Regiedebüt. “Cairo Jazzman” feierte die Weltpremiere beim International Film Festival Rotterdam 2017.

KONZERT (Kulturzentrum Bessunger Knabenschule)
20:00 Uhr

Brigade Futur III + Spielvereinigung Sued
Alles wird gut gegangen sein werden – Das Konzert

Nicht nur grammatikalische Formen lassen sich fiktiv erweitern, sondern auch fiktionale politische Programmatiken in musikalische Spielformen transferieren. Das zumindest beweist die Berliner Brigade Futur 3. Mehr Informationen zum Konzert

Das Konzert wird präsentiert von

Foto: Ebasi Rediger©

— — —

ab Montag, 7. Oktober 2019

AUSSTELLUNG (ab 3. Oktober)

Vortragssaal im Literaturhaus + Galerie im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt
Alles wird gut gegangen sein werden – die Ausstellung
(wegen der Konferenz im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt öffentlich erst ab 7.10. zu sehen)

— — —

Das 16. Darmstädter Jazzforum wird gefördert vom Hessischen Ministerium für Wissenschaft und Kunst, den Kulturfonds Frankfurt RheinMain und der Wissenschaftsstadt Darmstadt. Wir danken für die freundliche Unterstützung durch die Sparkasse Darmstadt.

[:en]

Jazz was often seen as a music of resistance, however with its increasing institutionalization some of this political awareness seems to have vanished. It feels as if musicians are more interested in tackling the technical and aesthetic sides of the music while the audience sits back and compares what it hears with what it knows instead of focusing on the unknown, unexpected and perhaps a bit more complex gaze ahead.

Thus, while in the United States, the birthplace of Jazz, many current projects, be it by Vijay Iyer or Kamasi Washington, sport a political note, musicians in Europe seem to be content with jazz being appreciated as art music. However, at a time when all over Europe the social and political achievements of the past decades are being pushed back by new populist movements, all forms of art must face questions of social responsibility again, whether it’s a more conscious position towards climate change, poverty, education, and a global understanding of humanity, whether it’s advocating human dignity on all levels, or taking a clear stance against sexism, racism and any other kind of exclusion: “Diversity”, says Kamasi Washington, “should not be tolerated, it should be celebrated.”

Where, then, do we find such celebration of diversity within contemporary European jazz? How strong is the awareness of musicians for their own political and social responsibility? And why is it that in jazz, the genre with the deepest history of resistance, singing of political justice seems to be looked down upon?

At the 16th Darmstadt Jazzforum we want to ask such questions, in papers, panels, concert lectures, a workshop, an exhibition as well as an ensuing book documentation. We do not think that jazz needs to be converted. Not everything has to be political first. However, as everything will have a political aspect in 2019 as well, we want to talk to musicians, experts, scholars and others about why jazz with its ever-present history of resistance, with improvisation’s seismographic ability to capture present-time discourses, should take a first seat within the canon of contemporary music.

The conference part of the Darmstadt Jazzforum will take place from 3-6 October 2019 at Literaturhaus Darmstadt. It will be flanked by concerts, an exhibition and workshops at other venues and thus involve the whole city in our discourse about the political in jazz.

[to be continued soon]

The 16th Darmstadt Jazzforum is funded by the Hessen State Ministry for Higher Education, Research and the Arts and the City of Darmstadt – City of Science and Culture

[The rest of this page is in German as that will also be the language of the conference.]

— — —

Programm (Stand: 29. Juli 2019)
“POSITIONEN! Jazz und Politik”

Donnerstag, 3. Oktober 2019

AUSSTELLUNG (ab 3. Oktober)

Vortragssaal im Literaturhaus + Galerie im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt

Alles wird gut gegangen sein werden – die Ausstellung

Im Künstlerkollektiv BRIGADE FUTUR III haben sich Benjamin Weidekamp, Elia Rediger, Jérôme Bugnon und Michael Haves zusammengetan, um zu Fragen und Herausforderungen unserer Zeit künstlerisch Stellung zu beziehen. Dabei reflektieren sie nichts Geringeres als den Zustand der Welt, die Auswüchse des Kapitalismus und vor allem auch die Möglichkeiten jedes einzelnen, sich in den Diskurs einzubringen.

Als Musiker transportieren sie ihr politisches Statement im Sinne von Brecht und Weill in vielen Konzerten und Bühnenprojekten, oft zusammen mit anderen Musikern und Künstlern wie der Spielvereinigung Sued aus Leipzig.

Auf Einladung des Jazzinstituts Darmstadt hat sich die BRIGADE FUTUR III der Aufgabe gestellt, ihre Ideen im Rahmen dieser Ausstellung für das 16. Darmstädter Jazzforum “Jazz und Politik” umzusetzen.

Alles wird gut gegangen sein werden… aber wie nur? Wie kann man für ein positives Zukunftsbild einstehen, dessen Voraussetzungen in der Zukunft erst “geschaffen zu sein werden haben?” Die Idee des fiktionalen Futur III war geboren, mit dem die Künstler einen kategorischen Handlungsimperativ verbinden, um ein positives gesellschaftliches Narrativ zu entwerfen, für das es sich zu leben lohnt.

Auf der Basis ihres “Kampfalphabets”, in dem Schrecken unseres gesellschaftlichen Systems mit Alternativen kontrastiert werden, verfolgen sie ihren konzeptionellen Kunstansatz mit Sendungsbewusstsein.

“Die verheerenden Auswirkungen des Raubtierkapitalismus auf die Welt werden immer deutlicher und es ist klar, dass es so nicht mehr weiter gehen kann.” BRIGADE FUTUR III

(wegen der Konferenz im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt öffentlich erst ab 7.10. zu sehen) 


KONFERENZ (Literaturhaus)

14:00 Uhr
Eröffnung

14:15 Uhr
Stephan Braese, Aachen
Stammheim war nie Attica. Zur politischen Widerständigkeit des Jazz in Deutschland seit 1945

Ungeachtet des eminenten Einflusses, den die US-amerikanischen Entwicklungen stets hatten, standen die Entfaltung, aber auch die politischen Wirkungschancen des Jazz in Deutschland stets unter spezifischen Bedingungen. Ausgehend von der (Wieder-)Einführung des Jazz 1945, skizziert der Vortrag einige dieser Bedingungen, zu denen die ethnische Homogenität der deutschen Bevölkerung, der Kampf um die Legitimität des Jazz, ein spezifisch europäischer Kunstbegriff, die (west-)deutsche Interpretation der antiautoritären Bewegung 1966 ff. u.a. gehören. Die Ausführungen stellen die Frage danach, ob und inwieweit diese in den Gründungsjahrzehnten des deutschen Jazz angelegten Dispositive auch im heutigen Verhältnis zwischen Jazz und Politik noch zu erkennen und wirksam sind.

Stephan Braese (geb. 1961) studierte Germanistik, Geschichte und Erziehungswissenschaft in Hamburg. Seit 2009 ist er Ludwig Strauss-Professor für europäisch-jüdische Literatur- und Kulturgeschichte an der RWTH Aachen University. Einschlägige Veröffentlichungen u.a.: “Identifying the Impulse: Alfred Lion Founds the Blue Note Jazz Label”, in Eckart Goebel and Sigrid Weigel (ed.): “Escape to Life” – German Intellectuals in New York: A Compendium of Exile after 1933 (Berlin/ Boston: de Gruyter, 2013): 270-287; “‘kenny clarke im club st-germain-des-prés’ – Zu einem Satz von Alfred Andersch”, in Corina Caduff, Anne-Kathrin-Reulecke, Ulrike Vedder (ed.): Passionen – Objekte/ Schauplätze/ Denkstile (München: Wilhelm Fink 2010): 309-316.

15:15 Uhr

Henning Vetter, Osnabrück
Jazz als politische Musik? Über die Selbstbestimmung des Künstlers über die Rezeption und Deutungshoheit seines Werkes

Spricht man über Politik in Verbindung mit Jazz, so impliziert diese Zusammenführung eine Positionierung des Künstlers und des Publikums gleichermaßen. Doch wie kann eine an sich abstrakte Musik Haltung zeigen, Aussagen treffen? Und: welche Aussagen kann sie überhaupt treffen? Der Vortrag nähert sich diesen Fragestellungen von einer praktischen Seite am Beispiel des Kollektivs “The Dorf”. Dabei geht es auch darum, wer bestimmt, wie die Musik aufgenommen wird und ob die Intention des Künstlers bezüglich der Bedeutung seines eigenen Werkes nicht sogar überflüssig sein kann.

Henning Vetter studierte Musikwissenschaft und Medienkulturwissenschaft an der Universität zu Köln. Seine Abschlussarbeit widmete er dem Bassisten Charles Mingus im Hinblick auf die politische Wirkung dessen musikalischen Werkes. Von 2017 bis 2019 studierte Henning Vetter am Institut für Musik der Hochschule Osnabrück Saxophon und gründete vor drei Jahren gemeinsam mit Freunden in Köln das PAO-Kollektiv für experimentelle und improvisierte Musik.

16:15 Uhr
Nina Polaschegg, Wien
Sind frei Improvisierende die besseren Demokraten?

Gerne werden Jazz und frei improvisierte Musik als demokratisches Gesellschaftsmodell einem hierarchisch aufgebauten Orchesterapparat gegenüber gestellt. Und ein Streichquartett, wo stünde dann dieses? Ob und wieweit solche Modelle tragfähig sind und inwieweit hier Wunsch und Wirklichkeit auseinander klaffen ist eine der Fragen, denen in diesem Vortrag nachgegangen wird. Um in einem Zeitraffer und knappen Rückblick in die Anfänge des Free Jazz politisch motivierte freie Musik im Hier & Jetzt zu beleuchten und dabei auch einen Blick in die Welt der komponierten zeitgenössischen Musik zu werfen. 

Nina Polaschegg studierte Musikwissenschaften, Soziologie und Philosophie in Giessen und Hamburg wo sie auch promovierte. Ihre Forschungsschwerpunkte liegen im Bereich der zeitgenössischen komponierten, improvisierten und elektronischen Musik sowie im zeitgenössischen Jazz und Musiksoziologie. Sie lebt als Musikwissenschaftlerin, Musikpublizistin, Moderatorin und Kontrabassistin in Wien, arbeitet für diverse öffentlich-rechtliche Rundfunkanstalten in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz und schreibt für verschiedene Fachzeitschriften. Hatte Lehraufträge an den Musikhochschulen bzw. Universitäten Hamburg und Klagenfurt. Als Kontrabassistin spielte sie historisch informiert in  Barockorchestern und widmet sich v.a. der (freien) Improvisation.

17:15 (bis 17:45) Uhr
Benjamin Weidekamp + Michael Haves, Berlin
Alles wird gut gegangen sein werden – Der Talk

Benjamin Weidekamp und Michael Alves sind Mitglieder der  Brigade Futur III, die beim Darmstädter Jazzforum nicht nur musikalisch aktiv werden (zusammen mit der Spielvereinigung Sued am Samstagabend), sondern auch eine Ausstellung in den Räumen des Jazzinstituts und des Literaturhauses Darmstadt zeigen, in der sie den künstlerischen Prozess ihrer kreativen (und immer auch politischen / gesellschaftlichen) Arbeit beleuchten. Darum geht es auch bei ihrem gemeinsamen Vortrag im Konferenzteil des Jazzforums, in dem sie über die Diskussionen um ihre Darmstädter Beiträge berichten werden.

— — —

Freitag, 4. Oktober 2019

AUSSTELLUNG (ab 3. Oktober)

Vortragssaal im Literaturhaus + Galerie im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt
Alles wird gut gegangen sein werden – die Ausstellung
(wegen der Konferenz im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt öffentlich erst ab 7.10. zu sehen)

KONFERENZ (Literaturhaus)

9:30 Uhr
Wolfram Knauer, Darmstadt
Jazz und Politik – politischer Jazz? Eine bundesdeutsche Perspektive

Wer in diesen Zeiten nicht politisch denkt und handelt, hat ein Problem: Die Krisen, von denen wir von allen Seiten bedrängt werden, fordern doch nachgerade Position zu beziehen. Anhand konkreter Beispiele diskutiert Wolfram Knauer die durchaus unterschiedlichen Erwartungshaltungen an die gesellschaftliche Relevanz von Musik. So fragt er beispielsweise, inwieweit wir uns nicht selbst belügen, wenn wir der Musik außermusikalische Kompetenz zusprechen und sie nach dieser bemessen. Zugleich hinterfragt er aber auch, inwieweit Musik unpolitisch sein kann oder sollte. Tun wir Musik nicht unrecht, wenn wir in ihr die Utopie suchen, die uns in unserem eigenen Handeln fehlt?

Wolfram Knauer ist Musikwissenschaftler und seit seiner Gründung Direktor des Jazzinstituts Darmstadt. Er lehrte an mehreren Universitäten und war als erster Nichtamerikaner Louis Armstrong Professor of Jazz Studies an der Columbia University. Er ist Herausgeber der Darmstädter Beiträge zur Jazzforschung und Autor zahlreicher wissenschaftlicher Beiträge in Büchern und Fachzeitschriften. Bei Reclam erschienen seine Bücher Louis Armstrong (2010), Charlie Parker (2014) und Duke Ellington (2017) sowie jüngst “Play yourself, man!” Die Geschichte des Jazz in Deutschland (2019).

Mario Dunkel, Oldenburg
Afrodiasporische Musik und Populismus in Europa

Dass populäre Musik und Jazz der Verhandlung von Identitätskonzepten dienen, ist keine neue Erkenntnis. Kategorien wie Nation, race, Ethnizität, Gender und Klasse sind seit den Anfängen des Jazz wichtige Diskursfelder, in denen die Musik verortet und verstanden wird. Die Beziehung zwischen Gruppenidentität und Musik ist insbesondere in der Interaktion zwischen aktueller populärer Musik und zeitgenössischen politischen Bewegungen signifikant. So greift die Alternative für Deutschland (AfD) auf Demonstrationen beispielsweise nicht nur auf deutschsprachige Volksmusik und Richard Wagners Walkürenritt zurück, sondern sie setzt auch populäre Musik mit eindeutigen afrodiasporischen Bezügen ein, wenn etwa Xavier Naidoos “Raus aus dem Reichstag” eine Demonstration gegen den Bau einer Moschee in Rostock musikalisch begleitet. Dieser Beitrag geht solchen Aneignungsstrategien von afrodiasporischen Musiken in gegenwärtigen politischen Bewegungen nach. Welche Funktion hat die Verwendung afrodiasporischer Musiken in diesen politischen Bewegungen in Europa? Warum wird die Verwendung afrodiasporischer Musiken in diesen Zusammenhängen nicht als widersprüchlich empfunden, wo sie doch die Forderung nach kultureller Homogenität zu karikieren scheint? Inwiefern kann die Aneignung afrodiasporischer Musiken als Bestandteil aktueller Identitätspolitiken in Europa verstanden werden?

Mario Dunkel studierte in Dortmund, Atlanta und New York Musik, Englisch und Amerikanistik. 2014 promovierte er mit einer Dissertation zu Darstellungen von Jazzgeschichte an der TU Dortmund. Er ist zurzeit Juniorprofessor für Musikpädagogik am Institut für Musik der Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg. Zu seinen Forschungsschwerpunkten zählen Konstruktionen und Darstellungen von Jazzgeschichte, Musik und Politik sowie transkulturelle Musikpädagogik. Zurzeit leitet er das internationale Forschungsprojekt „Popular Music and the Rise of Populism in Europe“ (2019-2022).

11:30 Uhr
Martin Pfleiderer, Weimar
“… an outstanding artistic model of democratic cooperation”? Zur Interaktion im Jazz

Glaubt man der Resolution des US-Kongresses aus dem Jahre 1987, so ist Jazz ein herausragendes künstlerisches Modell demokratischer Kooperation. Denn im Jazz, so die verbreitete Vorstellung, halten sich Gruppeninteraktion und individueller Ausdruck die Waage, und in seinen klanglichen Strukturen lassen sich die Prozesse gleichberechtigter Interaktion und Kooperation auch für Außenstehende nachvollziehen. Diese Vorstellungen sollen im Vortrag kritisch hinterfragt werden. Wie geht der interaktive Schaffensprozess im Jazz tatsächlich vonstatten? Welchen Stellenwert haben dabei einerseits körperliche Synchronisierungsprozesse zwischen den MusikerInnen, andererseits explizite Signale und Absprachen? Wird eine gleichberechtigte Interaktion nur inszeniert und auf der Bühne dargestellt, oder ist sie real und hat reale Konsequenzen? Welche Rolle spielen hierarchische Strukturen, Führerschaft und Autorität innerhalb von Jazzbands? Kann schon allein im Prozess des interaktiv-improvisatorischen Musikmachens ein politischer oder sogar utopischer Gehalt aufscheinen oder sind dafür zusätzlich bestimmte Symbole oder Musiker-Statements erforderlich? Neben musiksoziologischen und musikanalytischen Zugängen sollen zur Klärung dieser Fragen auch neuere Ansätze der ›embodied music interaction‹ und der Diskussion um musikalische ›agency‹ herangezogen werden.

Martin Pfleiderer (Jg. 1967) studierte Musikwissenschaft, Philosophie und Soziologie in Gießen und war 1999-2005 wissenschaftlicher Assistent für Systematische Musikwissenschaft an der Uni Hamburg. Seit 2009 ist er Professor für Geschichte des Jazz und der populären Musik am Institut für Musikwissenschaft Weimar-Jena. Er hat zahlreiche Aufsätze zum Jazz veröffentlicht und ist darüber hinaus leidenschaftlicher Jazzsaxophonist.

14:00 Uhr
Panel mit Nadin Deventer, Berlin | Tina Heine, Salzburg | Lena Jeckel, Gütersloh | Ulrich Stock, Hamburg
Veranstalter/innen: die Influencer des Jazz?

In diesem Panel wollen wir über die Strukturzwänge sprechen, in denen insbesondere große Jazzevents organisiert und wahrgenommen werden. Welche Aufgabe haben Kurator/innen über das reine Programmieren hinaus? Wie können Festivals oder Konzertreihen nachhaltig wirken, eine regionale Szene einbinden und zugleich im internationalen Diskurs des Jazz wahrgenommen werden? Welche Auswirkungen haben programmatische Entscheidungen auf die Diskussion innerhalb der gesamten bundesdeutschen Szene? Oder, und damit deutlicher auf unser Konferenzthema bezogen: Wie gehen Programmverantwortliche auf gesellschafts- und kulturpolitische Diskurse ein? Wollen sie das überhaupt oder müssen sie gegebenenfalls auf gesamtgesellschaftlich diskutierte Themen reagieren? Wie schließlich spiegeln sich ihre Programmentscheidungen in der öffentlichen Wahrnehmung wieder? Mit Tina Heine, Lena Jeckel und Nadin Deventer haben wir drei Programmverantwortliche auf dem Podium, die aus eigener Erfahrung über das Machbare genauso wie über das Wünschenswerte berichten können. Mit Ulrich Stock ist zudem ein Journalist dabei, der immer wieder über die Reaktion der Jazzszene auf aktuelle Fragen berichtet und die verschiedenen Orte erkundet, an denen diese gesellschaftlich-musikalische Auseinandersetzung zu erleben ist.

15:30 Uhr
Nikolaus Neuser + Florian Juncker, Berlin
“Occupied Reading”: Musikalische Intervention

Wie verändert die Lektüre politischer, ästhetischer oder sonstiger Texte die Wahrnehmung von Musik? Wie verändert Musik die Lektüre politischer, ästhetischer oder anderer Texte? Nikolaus Neuser und Florian Juncker machen die Probe aufs Exempel, und wir erfahren: Musik verändert das Denken, aber das Denken verändert auch die musikalische Wahrnehmung. Welchen Diskurs lassen solche intermedialen Erfahrungen entstehen? Und was lehren sie uns letzten Endes über den tatsächlichen Einfluss von Musik (oder Kunst im Allgemeinen) auf unser gesellschaftliches Denken und Handeln?

16:00 Uhr
Hans Lüdemann
“Beyond the underdog”. Gesellschaftliche und politische Positionierung eines deutschen Jazzmusikers heute (Vortrag live am Klavier / Lecture-Performance)

Hans Lüdemann erzählt, warum die politische Einstellung für ihn eine der wichtigen Motivationen war, überhaupt Jazzmusiker zu werden. Er fragt, welche Bedeutung eine politische Haltung in Bezug auf den Jazz heute hat, wie und worin sie sich ausdrücken kann. Am Klavier erklingen politisch gefärbte und gedeutete Musikstücke und es wird den Widersprüchen nachgespürt, die sich zwischen politischer Haltung und Botschaft einerseits und der abstrakten Welt der Töne andererseits auftun können. Aber auch die Positionierung und Behauptung des Musikers in der gesellschaftlichen Realität zwischen Kunst, Kommerz, Kulturförderung und Kapitalismus wird dabei mit ins Bild gerückt.

Hans Lüdemann ist Jazzpianist und Komponist. Er hat mit deutschen und internationalen Größen zusammengearbeitet wie Eberhard Weber, Heinz Sauer, Manfred Schoof, Angelika Niescier, Jan Garbarek und Paul Bley. Im Zentrum seiner Arbeit stehen jedoch eigene Projekte: er spielt Solokonzerte, zuletzt 2018 in China, im Trio ROOMS, arbeitet seit 20 Jahren mit dem afrikanischen Balaphon-Meister Aly Keita im TRIO IVOIRE zusammen und leitet das deutsch-französische Oktett „TransEuropeExpress“. Er erweitert das Klavier mit Samples in mikrotonale Bereiche, was in dem neuen Quartett mikroPULS mit Gebhard Ullmann, Oliver Potratz und Eric Schaefer besonders zur Geltung kommt. Hans Lüdemann hat über 30 Alben bei renommierten Labels veröffentlicht. Seine bisher umfangreichste Produktion, die CD – Box„die kunst des trios“, wurde 2013 mit dem „Echo Jazz“ ausgezeichnet. Lüdemann war von 1993 – 2008 Dozent für Jazz-Klavier und – Ensemble an der Musikhochschule Köln, 2009/2010 und 2015/16 Cornell Visiting Professor am Swarthmore College in Philadelphia/USA.

KONZERT (Centralstation Darmstadt)
20:00 Uhr

Anarchist Republic of Bzzz (FR/NL/TR/USA)

Seb El Zin, in Paris lebender Sänger der Ethno-Punk-Band ITHAK, gründete diese etwas andere Supergroup – musikalisch zwischen Impro-Avantgarde, Worldmusic und Slampoetry. Mehr Informationen zum Konzert

Das Konzert wird präsentiert von

Collage: Kiki Picasso©

— — —

Samstag, 5. Oktober 2019

AUSSTELLUNG (ab 3. Oktober)

Vortragssaal im Literaturhaus + Galerie im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt
Alles wird gut gegangen sein werden – die Ausstellung
(wegen der Konferenz im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt öffentlich erst ab 7.10. zu sehen)

KONFERENZ (Literaturhaus)

9:30 Uhr
Nikolaus Neuser, Berlin
Jazz und improvisierte Musik als soziales Rollenmodell?

Wir sind heute täglich in immer komplexere Zusammenhänge eingebunden, auf die wir in immer schnelleren Rückkopplungen reagieren müssen. Durch die Digitalisierung befinden wir uns sowohl technologisch als auch in unserer Kommunikation und Diskursfähigkeit in erheblichen Umbrüchen. Welche Kompetenzen und Modelle zukünftigen Miteinanders liefert uns die Kulturtechnik der Improvisation vor diesem Hintergrund? Nikolaus Neuser beleuchtet diese Fragestellung auch aus der konkreten Perspektive seiner kulturpolitischen Arbeit.

Nikolaus Neuser studierte an der Folkwang-Hochschule in Essen Trompete bei Uli Beckerhoff. Aktuell interpretiert er mit dem Trio I Am Three unkonventionell  besetzt die Musik von Charles Mingus. 2016 legte das Trio das international vielbeachtete Album Mingus Mingus Mingus (Leo Records) vor (Jahresbestenliste Downbeat Magazin, All about Jazz, NYC Jazz Records uva.). Er arbeitet außerdem im Trio mit Richard Scott und Alexander Frangenheim an elekroakkustischer improvisierter Musik und ist u.a. Mitglied der Ensembles Potsa Lotsa, Andreas Willers´ 7 of 8, des Hannes Zerbe Jazz Orchesters und des Berlin Improvisers Orchestra. Nikolaus Neuser hat mit Matthew Herbert, Matana Roberts, Tyshawn Sorey, Nate Wooley, Maggie Nicols, Peter Fox, Seeed sowie dem London Improvisers Orchestra u.v.a gearbeitet und ist auf über 50 CDs zu hören. Konzertreisen u.a. auf Einladung des Goethe Instituts führten ihn durch Europa, Asien, Nordafrika, die USA, in den Libanon, Jordanien, Saudi-Arabien sowie nach Kolumbien, wo er als Gastprofessor an der Pontificia Universidad Javeriana de Bogotá lehrte.

10:30 Uhr
Michael Rüsenberg, Köln
“Jazz ist stets politisch.” Stimmt diese Aussage von Mark Turner? Und, hört man sie in seiner Musik?

Im November 2016 (Donald Trump ist gerade gewählt), vermutet der amerikanische Saxophonist Mark Turner im Gespräch mit der NZZ, “dass es wieder zu einer Politisierung der Kunst kommen wird.” Das ist eine Überzeugung, die wie unter einem Brennglas den zentralen Inhalt des Politikverständisses weiter Teile der Jazzszene wiedergibt (s. Titel). “Allein schon der Entscheid, als Jazzmusiker zu leben, ist ein politisches Statement. Denn man entscheidet sich damit für Freiheit, für Emanzipation und gegen den Primat des materiellen Erfolgs” (Turner). Michael Rüsenberg unterzieht diese Position einer grundsätzlichen Kritik.

Michael Rüsenberg, geb 1948, Journalist, Buchautor, Gastgeber der philosophischen Gesprächsreihe “Gedankensprünge” in Bann. Adolf-Grimme-Preis 1989, WDR Jazzpreis 2015. Buchprojekt “Improvisation – ein Prinzip des Lebens” (in Vorbereitung)

11:30 Uhr
Thomas Krüger, Berlin

Der Beitrag von Kunst und Kultur, insbesondere des Jazz, für aktuelle gesellschaftspolitische Diskurse

In meinem Beitrag würde ich zunächst auf die Debatte um die Kulturalisierung des Politischen eingehen und aktuelle Tendenzen politischer Verschiebungen aufzeigen. Ich werde die kreative wie auch die rezeptive Seite von kulturellen Artefakten beleuchten und nach dem Politischen in der Ästhetik fragen. Und danach, was der Jazz, insbesondere der frei improvisierende Jazz in diesem Zusammenhang für ein Potential hat.

Thomas Krüger ist seit 2000 Präsident der Bundeszentrale für politischen Bildung. Seit 1995 ist er Präsident des Deutschen Kinderhilfswerkes. Außerdem ist er zweiter stellvertretender Vorsitzender der Kommission für Jugendmedienschutz und Mitglied des Kuratoriums für den Geschichtswettbewerb des Bundespräsidenten. 1991 bis 1994 war er Senator für Jugend und Familie in Berlin, 1994 bis 1998 Mitglied des Deutschen Bundestages.

14:00 Uhr
Angelika Niescier + Tim Isfort + Victoriah Szirmai + Korhan Erel
… im Ohr des Betrachters
(Lecture-Performance)

Der Ton: ein physikalisches Ereignis, ohne ästhetische noch politische Intention.
In der Wahrnehmung der Rezipienten wird „der Ton“ aber sofort kontextualisiert – eine essentielle Projektionsfläche für tatsächliche und irreale Intentionen, Botschaften und Diskursangebote. In dieser Lecture Performance mit Musiker*innen, Kurator*innen und Jornalist*innen werden unterschiedliche  Perspektiven des Themenclusters untersucht, um Überschneidungen, Unterschiede und mögliche Kontroversen zu verdeutlichen und um sich in der Diskussion dem Intendierten, Verstandenen und Missverstandenen und dem Phänomen des “Politischen” in der Musik zu nähern.

16:30 Uhr (programmkinorex Darmstadt)
Atef Ben Bouzid, Berlin

Cairo Jazzman – The Groove of a Megacity

“Jazz is more than just a style of music”, sagt Amr Salah. “It’s about freedom.” Salah, ägyptischer Pianist und Komponist, kämpft seit 2009 jedes Jahr darum, das Cairo Jazz Festival zu realisieren. Jazz ist zu seinem Lebensinhalt geworden, weil diese Musik in seinen Augen völkerverbindend ist und speziell der Jugend ein Sprachrohr gibt. Für Amr Salah handelt es sich um einen vielfältigen Musikstil, der damit auch für Liberalität und Offenheit einer Gesellschaft steht, für die es sich zu kämpfen lohnt. Atif Ben Bouzids Film über das Cairo Jazz Festival gibt ungewohnte und vielschichtige Einblicke in das Leben der Zivilgesellschaft in der Megacity Kairo, eingebettet im Jazz als einer universellen, völkerverbindenden und horizonterweiternden Sprache.
Mehr Informationen zum Film

Nach der Filmvorführung gibt es ein Filmgespräch mit dem Regisseur über Jazz und zivilgesellschaftlicher Aktivismus in der arabischen Welt.

Atef Ben Bouzid ist ein deutscher Journalist, Regisseur und Produzent aus Berlin mit dem Fokus auf Sport, Musik und Gesellschaft. “Cairo Jazzman” ist sein Regiedebüt. “Cairo Jazzman” feierte die Weltpremiere beim International Film Festival Rotterdam 2017.

KONZERT (Kulturzentrum Bessunger Knabenschule)
20:00 Uhr

Brigade Futur III + Spielvereinigung Sued
Alles wird gut gegangen sein werden – Das Konzert

Nicht nur grammatikalische Formen lassen sich fiktiv erweitern, sondern auch fiktionale politische Programmatiken in musikalische Spielformen transferieren. Das zumindest beweist die Berliner Brigade Futur 3. Mehr Informationen zum Konzert

Das Konzert wird präsentiert von

Foto: Ebasi Rediger©

— — —

ab Montag, 7. Oktober 2019

AUSSTELLUNG (ab 3. Oktober)

Vortragssaal im Literaturhaus + Galerie im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt
Alles wird gut gegangen sein werden – die Ausstellung
(wegen der Konferenz im Jazzinstitut Darmstadt öffentlich erst ab 7.10. zu sehen)

— — —

Das 16. Darmstädter Jazzforum wird gefördert vom Hessischen Ministerium für Wissenschaft und Kunst, den Kulturfonds Frankfurt RheinMain und der Wissenschaftsstadt Darmstadt. Wir danken für die freundliche Unterstützung durch die Sparkasse Darmstadt.

 

 

Jazz @ 100

[:de]

Konferenz, 28. bis 30. September 2017
K
onzerte, Ausstellung (September / Oktober 2017)

Im hundertsten Geburtsjahr des Jazz – die Aufnahmen der Original Dixieland Jass Band aus dem Jahr 1917 werden gern als erste Jazzaufnahmen genannt – wirft das Darmstädter Jazzforum einen Blick auf die Tücken einer Jazzgeschichtsschreibung, in der Legenden oft den Blick auf das verstellen, worauf es in dieser Musik noch viel mehr ankommt: auf die Multiperspektivität einer Musik, die nicht nur von den großen Meistern, auf jeden Fall aber von vielen Individualisten geprägt wird.

Das 15. Darmstädter Jazzforum will die Jazzgeschichte dabei nicht neu schreiben. In der internationalen  Konferenz, in Konzerten und einer Ausstellung hoffen wir allerdings auf eine lebendige Diskussion darüber, wie unser Verständnis von dieser Musik, ihrer Geschichte und ihrer Ästhetik geprägt wurde. Wir verstehen den Jazz als eine Musik mit einer mehr als hundertjährigen Geschichte, und wir wissen, dass diese weit komplexer ist, als die Geschichtsbücher uns das meistens wahrmachen wollen. Unser Ziel ist es, ein wenig von dieser Komplexität zu entwirren, wohl wissend, dass wir damit höchstens an der Oberfläche kratzen werden.

Konferenzprogramm/Kurze Zusammenfassung
“Jazz @ 100. (K)eine Heldengeschichte”

Am Donnerstag werden wir uns mit der Wahrnehmung von Jazzgeschichte, ihren Heroen und den Orten, an denen sie stattfinden, nähern. Der Fotograf und Journalist Arne Reimer besuchte für seine beiden Bücher „American Jazz Heroes“ Musiker zuhause, erhielt dabei einen Einblick in ihr privates Lebensumfeld, und reflektiert über den Unterschied zwischen Lebenswirklichkeit, medialer Selbst- und Fremdwahrnehmung. Nicolas Gebhardt nimmt Jelly Roll Mortons 1938 aufgenommene Erinnerungen zum Anlass, darüber zu reflektieren, wie wichtig das Wissen um Lebens- und Arbeitsbedingungen von Musiker/innen ist, um ihre historiographische Einordnung zu verstehen, nämlich die Beziehung zwischen Narrativ, Erinnerung und kultureller Einbildungskraft. Katherine  M. Leo beendet den ersten Konferenztag mit einem Blick auf die Original Dixieland Jazz Band, deren Aufnahme des „Livery Stable Blues“ und des „Dixieland Jass Band One-Step“ vom 26. Februar 1917 oft als erste Aufnahme der Jazzgeschichte bezeichnet wird, nähert sich dabei mithilfe von Gerichtsakten und mit einem kritischen Blick auf die Rezeption der Platte den unterschiedlichen Narrativen, die sie auslöste.

Am Freitag beschäftigen sich sechs Referate mit vergangenen, sich wandelnden, sehr persönlichen Perspektiven auf den Jazz und seine Geschichte. Klaus Frieler berichtet vom Versuch Jazzgeschichte einmal nicht als Mischung biographischer, soziologischer und kultureller Kontextualisierungen sowie musikalischer Charakterisierungen zu erzählen, sondern anhand der computer-gestützten Analyse von Solo-Improvisationen. Andrew Hurley untersucht die verschiedenen Ausgaben von Joachim Ernst Berendts „Jazzbuch“  auf die veränderten Perspektiven des Autors und erklärt an diesem Beispiel unterschiedliche Formen der Narrativbildung. Tony Whyton fragt nach der Bedeutung lokaler und oft sehr persönlicher Erinnerungen von Musikern oder Veranstaltern für den Diskurs etwa über Jazz als transnationale Praxis. Mario Dunkel sieht in Darcy James Argue’s Secret Society den spannenden Versuch, sich eine alternative Jazzgeschichte vorzustellen und dabei auch auf nicht realisierte Möglichkeiten der Musik aufmerksam zu machen. Der Pianist und Komponist Orrin Evans spricht über den Jazz als eine aktuelle, relevante Kunst, und über die (afro-)amerikanische Identität der Musik auch im immer komplexer werdenden globalen Kontext.  Krin Gabbard sieht sich den Hollywoodfilm „Syncopation“ aus dem Jahr 1942 an, fragt, wie Ansätze der „new jazz studies“ dabei helfen können, die der Kunst (und dem Film) zugrundeliegenden Vorstellungen von Hautfarbe, sozialer und wirtschaftlicher Machtverhältnisse zu analysieren.

Am Samstag geht es vor allem um das Entstehen von Narrativen, den Einfluss von Musikern und anderen Akteuren der Musikindustrie an ihrer eigenen Geschichtseinordnung sowie der (Nach-) Wirkung solcher Narrative bei den Rezipienten. Wolfram Knauer betrachtet die Orte, an denen Jazz gespielt wird und untersucht die Auswirkungen mehr oder weniger ikonischer Spielorte auf Musik, Musiker, die Jazzszene sowie die Wahrnehmung von Jazzgeschichte. Oleg Pronitschew diskutiert die zunehmende Institutionalisierung der deutschen Jazzszene in den letzten 40 Jahren anhand ausgewählter Beispiele und fragt nach deren Auswirkung auf das öffentliche Bild des Jazz. Rüdiger Ritter untersucht die Begeisterung für die „Giganten des Jazz“ in Osteuropa und diskutiert, warum Mythen im Jazz zugleich produktive Elemente und ein künstlerisches Gefängnis sein können. Mit einem Blick auf den Einfluss der Gullah- und Geechie-Kultur in der Küstenregion von South Carolina beschreibt Karen Chandler, dass die Darstellung einer Jazzentwicklung entlang klarer geografischer Zentren die komplexe Entstehungsgeschichte des Jazz als einer musikalischen genauso wie sozialen Praxis verfälscht. Scott DeVeaux hinterfragt die Anfänge des Bebop, der die Grundlage für den modernen Jazz legte, und fragt, inwieweit die Entscheidungen, die Musiker in den 1940er Jahren machten, bis heute die Ästhetik des zeitgenössischen Jazz beeinflussen. Schließlich beendet Nicolas Pillai das 15. Darmstädter Jazzforum mit einem Referat über das „dissonante Bild“, das sich in der medialen Repräsentation von Miles Davis findet und fragt, auf welche Art und Weise der späte Miles Einfluss weit über seine Musik hinaus hatte.

 


Konferenzprogramm/Referenten und Zeitplan
Jazz @ 100. (K)eine Heldengeschichte”

Donnerstag, 27. September 2017

14:00 Uhr
Eröffnung

14:30 Uhr
Arne Reimer, Deutschland
My Encounters with “American Jazz Heroes”

Arne Reimer hat für sein zwei Buchprojekte “American Jazz Heroes” ältere US-amerikanische Jazzmusiker zuhause besucht, und zwar sowohl Künstler mit auch finanziell erfolgreichen Karrieren als auch solche, die heute eher in prekären Verhältnissen leben. Beim Darmstädter Jazzforum fragt er danach, wie letztere mit der mangelnden Anerkennung umgehen, mit der Tatsache, dass die kreative und erfolgreiche Phase ihrer Karriere lange zurückliegt. Zugleich thematisiert er seinen eigenen Ansatz als Fotograf und Journalist, dessen Fokus auf diese Musiker sie ja auf eine Weise selbst zurück in den Mittelpunkt rückt und damit ein neues Narrativ von Jazzgeschichte schafft.

Arne Reimer studierte Fotografie an der Hochschule für Grafik und Buchkunst Leipzig (HGB) und in den USA mit einem Fulbright Stipendium am Massachusetts College of Art in Boston, MA. Als künstlerischer Mitarbeiter im Fachbereich Fotografie hat er sechs Jahre an der HGB Leipzig unterrichtet. Seine beiden Bücher “American Jazz Heroes”, veröffentlicht 2013 und 2016, erhielten zahlreiche Preise, darunter zuletzt 2017 einen Echo Jazz Sonderpreis. Reimer arbeitet außerdem als Kurator und freiberuflicher Fotograf für Zeitschriften (z.B. Jazz Thing) und Plattenfirmen (z.B. ECM Records).

15:30 Uhr
Nicholas Gebhardt, England
Reality Remade: Historical Narrative and the Cultural Imagination in Alan Lomax’s Mister Jelly Roll

Nicolas Gebhardt geht von einer der ersten autobiographischen Dokumentationen zum Jazz aus, Jelly Roll Mortons oraler Jazzgeschichte, die er 1938 für die Library of Congress aufnahm und fragt dabei nach den verschiedenen Perspektiven, die sich in der Veröffentlichung dieses Materials widerspiegeln: Mortons eigene Sicht auf seine Rolle in der Frühzeit dieser Musik, die er in Wort und Musik manifestiert, Alan Lomaxs Auswahl und Interpretation dessen, was er in sein später veröffentlichtes Buch “Mister Jelly Roll” übernahm, und unsere Haltung als Jazzforscher, wenn wir Musiker, ihre Musik, ihre  Lebens- und Arbeitsbedingungen kontextualisieren, um Jazzgeschichte über ihre bisherige Darstellung hinaus differenzierter beschreiben zu können.

Nicholas Gebhardt ist Professor für Jazz and Popular Music Studies an der Birmingham City University. Seine Forschungsschwerpunkte konzentrieren sich auf Jazz and populäre Musik in der amerikanischen Kultur, und zu seinen Publikationen zählen beispielsweise Going For Jazz: Musical Practices and American Ideology (Chicago), The Cultural Politics of Jazz Collectives (Routledge) sowie Vaudeville Melodies: Popular Musicians and Mass Entertainment in American Culture, 1870-1929 (Chicago). Er ist Mitherausgeber der beim Verlag Routledge Press erscheinenden Buchreihe Transnational Studies In Jazz sowie des in Kürze erscheinenden The Routledge Companion to Jazz Studies.

16:30 Uhr
Katherine M. Leo, USA
The ODJB at 100: Revisiting Essential Narratives and Victor 18255

Katherine  M. Leo untersucht die Selbst- und Außendarstellung der Original Dixieland Jazz Band, deren “Livery Stable Blues” und “Dixieland Jass Band One-Step” vom 26. Februar 1917 oft als erste Aufnahmen der Jazzgeschichte bezeichnet werden. Sie findet, dass die Rezeption der Band in der Jazzgeschichtsschreibung meist auf die Aufnahme von 1917 reduziert wird und plädiert für eine weiter gefasste Betrachtung, nicht nur der Musik, sondern auch der Narrative, die der ODJB über die letzten 100 Jahre angeheftet wurden und nutzt dafür neben anderen Quellen auch Gerichtsakten zu zwei Copyright-Prozessen, die just die beiden Seite der ersten Jazzplatte betreffen.

Katherine M. Leo ist seit Herbst diesen Jahres an der Millikin University als Assistant Professor in den Fächern Musikwissenschaft und Musikethnologie. Ihr Forschungsschwerpunkt liegt im Bereich amerikanische Rechts- und Musikgeschichte, mit besonderem Fokus auf die populäre Musik des frühen 20sten Jahrhunderts. Leo hat sowohl einen philosophischen wie einen juristischen Abschluss von der Ohio State University, wobei sich ihre Dissertation mit der Geschichte musikalischer Gutachten in Urheberrechtsstreitigkeiten vor amerikanischen Gerichten auseinandersetzte, während ihre Masterarbeit Fragen zur Urheberschaft in Bezug auf die ODJB zum Thema hatte. Leo ist auf wissenschaftlichen Tagungen präsent, zuletzt beispielsweise für die American Musicological Society und die Society for American Music, eine weitere Veröffentlichung im Journal of Music History Pedagogy ist in Arbeit.

— — —

Freitag, 29. September 2017

9:30 Uhr
Klaus Frieler, Deutschland
A Feature History of Jazz Solo Improvisation

Klaus Frieler berichtet vom Versuch Jazzgeschichte einmal nicht als Mischung biographischer, soziologischer und kultureller Kontextualisierungen sowie musikalischer Charakterisierungen zu erzählen, sondern anhand der computer-gestützten Analyse von Solo-Improvisationen. Er nutzt dafür das Jazzomat Programm der Weimar Jazz Database, mithilfe dessen sich Soli nach unterschiedlichen Charakteristika, etwa melodischen Formeln,  der harmonischen Dichte, der rhythmischen Komplexität und anderen Parametern untersuchen lassen. Frieler fragt dabei, inwieweit solche scheinbar objektiven Funde helfen können, den kreativen Prozess zu beschreiben und diskutiert mögliche zukünftige Erweiterungen des Projekts.

Klaus Frieler hat an der Universität sowohl ein Diplom in theoretischer Physik (1997) wie auch eine Promotion in systematischer Musikwissenschaft gemacht. Er arbeitete mehrere Jahre als freiberuflicher Software-Entwickler und unterrichtete ab 2008 als wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am Institut für Systematische Musikwissenschaft in Hamburg sowie für kurze Zeit am Centre for Digital Music der Queen Mary University of London. Seit Herbst 2012 arbeitet er am Jazzomat Research Project der Hochschule für Musik “Franz Liszt” in Weimar und ist seit 2017 am Max-Planck-Institut für empirische Ästhetik tätig. Frieler forscht und lebt an der Schnittstelle von Musikpsychologie und Musikinformatik. Große und kleine Datensätze sind sein täglich Brot, in der Hoffnung, darin verborgenen Mustern auf die Spur zu kommen, die Aufschlüsse darüber geben können, was Musik ist, warum Musik ist und wie Musik ist. Seit 2006 ist er außerdem als freischaffender Musikgutachter tätig. Siehe http://www.mu-on.org für weitere Informationen.

10:30 Uhr

Andrew Hurley, Australia
In and Out: Processes of Inclusion and Exclusion in Joachim-Ernst Berendt’s Jazzbuch/Jazzbook, 1953-2011

Für deutsche Jazzfans lieferten die Bücher von Joachim Ernst Berendt lange den wichtigsten Orientierungspunkt. Andrew Hurley untersucht die verschiedenen Ausgaben seines “Jazzbuchs” von 1953 bis in die Gegenwart auf die veränderten Perspektiven des bzw. der Autoren, auf die daraus ablesbaren sich wandelnden Konzepte einer Jazzgeschichtsschreibung, sowie auf die darin berücksichtigten Narrative und jene, die ausgespart wurden. Dabei entdeckt er am konkreten Beispiel, wie Narrativbildung funktioniert, wie der Diskurs durch bewusste Gegenmodelle forciert wird und wie sich in diesem Streit der Narrative die Wahrnehmung von scheinbarer Wirklichkeit wandelt.

Andrew W. Hurley ist Associate Professor an der Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences der Technischen Universität in Sydney, Australien, wo er im International Studies-Programm arbeitet. Er ist Autor zweier Monographien: The Return of Jazz: Joachim-Ernst Berendt and West German Cultural Change (Berghahn, 2011) and Into The Groove:  Popular Music and Contemporary German Fiction (Boydell & Brewer, 2015)

11:30 Uhr
Tony Whyton, England
Wilkie’s story: hidden musicians, cosmopolitan connections, and dominant jazz histories

Tony Whyton entdeckt in einer Kiste Erinnerungsstücke seines angeheirateten Großonkels, die dessen Verbindungen zur Jazzszene Großbritanniens seit den Mitt-1920er Jahren dokumentieren. Anhand dieses Beispiels fragt Whyton nach der Bedeutung lokaler, oft versteckter und sehr persönlicher Erinnerungen an und Sichtweisen auf den Jazz für einen größeren, solche Details oft außer Acht lassenden Diskurs über Jazz und seine Geschichte und insbesondere für die Erforschung etwa von Jazz als einer transnationalen Praxis.

Tony Whyton ist Professor of Jazz Studies am Birmingham City College. Seine Publikationen Jazz Icons: Heroes, Myths and the Jazz Tradition (Cambridge University Press, 2010) und Beyond A Love Supreme: John Coltrane and the Legacy of an Album (Oxford University Press, 2013) versuchen interdisziplinäre Fragestellungen und Lösungswege zu beschreiten. Als Herausgeber war Whyton für die Jazzausgabe der Ashgate Library, Essays on Popular Music (2011), verantwortlich, als Mitherausgeber betreut er das Jazz Research Journal (Equinox). 2014 begründete er zusammen mit seinem BCU-Kollegen Nicholas Gebhardt eine neue Reihe des Verlags Routledge Press, Transnational Studies in Jazz, ist außerdem Herausgeber von The Cultural Politics of Jazz Collectives: This Is Our Music (Routledge, 2015), einer Sammlung von Aufsätzen, die sich auf Musikerkollektive fokussiert und fragt, inwieweit diese als Modell für ein Umdenken der Jazz-Praxis im Nachkriegsjazz dienen können. Von 2010-2013 war Whyton Projektleiter des durch HERA geförderten Projekts Rhythm Changes: Jazz Cultures and European Identities (http://www.rhythmchanges.net), in dem dreizehn Forscher/innen an sieben Universitäten in fünf Ländern zusammenarbeiteten.

14:30 Uhr

Mario Dunkel, Germany
Darcy James Argue’s Uchronic Jazz

Mario Dunkel stellt das aktuelle Projekt des Komponisten und Bandleaders Darcy James Argue als den Versuch dar, eine alternative Jazzgeschichte zu recherchieren, etwa, indem er sich überlegt, wie Bigbandmusik wohl klingen möge, wenn sie populär geblieben wäre und Stilelemente vieler ihr folgender populärer Genres von Rock über Grunge bis HipHop aufgenommen hätte. Die Frage “Was wäre wenn?” hilft dabei, so Dunkel, die eigene Perspektive zu erweitern, und zwar sowohl in Bezug auf tatsächliche Jazzgeschichte wie auch auf vielleicht nicht realisierte Möglichkeiten.

Mario Dunkel ist Juniorprofessor für Musikpädagogik an der Carl von Ossietzky Universität in Oldenburg. Seine Forschungsinteressen umfassen transkulturelle Musikvermittlung, Jazzgeschichte und die Praxis der Musikdiplomatie.

15:30 Uhr
Orrin Evans, USA
A Talk with Orrin Evans

Orrin Evans ist Pianist, Komponist und, obwohl in Philadelphia lebend, ein in der New Yorker Szene der Gegenwart tief verankerter Musiker. Mit ihm werden wir uns über die eigene Sicht auf den Jazz als eine relevante Kunst unterhalten, über die nach wie vor künstlerische Identität schaffenden Momente von Improvisation in der Tradition des Jazz, sowie über den Wandel dieser Musik von einer (afro-)amerikanischen Musik hin zu einer Kunstform, die komplexe und zum Teil weit voneinander entfernte Spielformen ausgebildet hat, welche es schon mal schwer machen, das alles unter einem Begriff zu subsumieren.

Seit 1995 hat der Pianist und Komponist Orrin Evans mehr als 25 Alben als Bandleader aufgenommen und auf unzähligen weiteren mitgewirkt. Er ist tief in der reichen Jazzszene von Philadelphia verwurzelt, wo er bis heute lebt, obwohl er wöchentlich in new York (und anderswo) spielt. Evans tritt mit seinem trio, seiner Band Tarbaby oder mit der Captain Black Big Band auf. Ab Frühjahr 2018 wird er Ethan Iverson m Trio The Bad Plus ersetzen. Orrin Evans wird am Samstagabend beim 15. Darmstädter Jazzforum ein Solokonzert geben.

16:30 Uhr
Krin Gabbard, USA
Syncopated Women

Krin Gabbard greift in seinem Beitrag das Thema unseres letzten Jazzforums auf und fragt, ausgehend von William Dieterles Film “Syncopation” von 1942, welche Rolle bestimmte Darstellungsweisen von Jazz und Jazzgeschichte innerhalb herrschender Gesellschaftsvorstellungen haben mögen. Wie kein anderer Film aus den 1940er Jahren benennt “Syncopation” die Sklaverei als wesentliche historische Komponente für die Entwicklung des Jazz. Zugleich wird im Film deutlich auf die Unterschiede zwischen dem wirtschaftlichen Erfolg schwarzer und weißer Bands hingewiesen. Und schließlich ist im Film eine ungewöhnlich ambivalente Haltung zur Rolle von Frauen an der Entwicklung der Musik festzustellen. Anhand dieses konkreten Beispiels plädiert Gabbard dafür, dass die “new jazz studies” eine facettenreichere Vorstellung von Jazzgeschichte ermöglichen und erklären helfen können, wie die hier angesprochenen Traditionen im Verständnis der Zeit zu verorten sind.

Krin Gabbard ist Professor of Jazz Studies sowie Direktor von J-Disc, einem diskographischen Forschungsprojekt an der Columbia University. Zu seinen Büchern gehören Jammin’ at the Margins: Jazz and the American Cinema (University of Chicago Press, 1996), Black Magic: White Hollywood and African American Culture (Rutgers University Press, 2004) und Better Git It in Your Soul: An Interpretive Biography of Charles Mingus (University of California Press, 2016). Er ist außerdem der Herausgeber von Jazz Among the Discourses (Duke University Press, 1995).

— — —

Samstag, 30. September 2017

9:30 Uhr

Wolfram Knauer, Deutschland
Four Sides of a House. How jazz spaces irritate, fascinate, stimulate creativity or become icons

Wolfram Knauer nähert sich der Idee eines idealen Raums für Jazz aus unterschiedlichen Sichtweisen. Säle mit großartiger Akustik, Clubs mit einer eigenen (oft jazzhistorischen) Aura, die Möglichkeit des “Alles-Hören-Könnens” oder die intime Situation, in der Musiker und Publikum einander besonders nah sind: An unterschiedlichen Beispielen kontrastiert er verschiedene Vorstellungen dessen, was ein idealer Jazzort sein könnte oder sollte, thematisiert die Einbindung solcher Orte in lokale oder weiter vernetzte Szenen und diskutiert, wie der Wandel der Präsentations- und Rezeptionsformate als Chance genauso wie als Bedrohung existierender Szenen gesehen werden kann, weil er zum einen tatsächlich großen Einfluss darauf hat, wie das Publikum die Musik wahrnimmt, und weil zum zweiten neue Orte auch die Präsentationserwartung von Jazz verändern.

Wolfram Knauer leitet seit 1990 das Jazzinstitut Darmstadt. Er ist Herausgeber der Darmstädter Beiträge zur Jazzforschung (bislang 14 Bände, Wolke 1990-2016) und hat diverse Bücher veröffentlicht, zuletzt Monographien über Louis Armstrong (Reclam 2010) und Charlie Parker (Reclam 2014). Eine weitere Monographie über Duke Ellington erscheint 2017 (Reclam). Er hat an verschiedenen deutschen Hochschulen unterrichtet und lehrte im Frühjahr 2008 als erster nicht-amerikanischer Louis Armstrong Professor of Jazz Studies an der Columbia University in New York.

10:30 Uhr
Oleg Pronitschew, Germany
A New Place for Jazz. Insights Into the Historic Institutionalization of German Jazz Music.

Oleg Pronitschew betrachtet die zunehmende Institutionalisierung der deutschen Jazzszene in den letzten 40 Jahren und fragt nach deren Auswirkung auf das öffentliche Bild des Jazz. Dabei beschreibt er den Wandel des Selbstverständnisses von Jazz als Kunstmusik und die damit einhergehenden veränderten ästhetischen, gesellschaftlichen wie kommerziellen Erwartungen an die Musik.

Oleg Pronitschew studierte europäische Ethnologie, Politische Wissenschaft und Neuere deutsche Literatur- und Medienwissenschaft an der Christian-Albrechts-Universität in Kiel. Zurzeit beendet er seine Promotion über die gesellschaftliche Imagination von Popularmusiker/innen im Bereich Jazz und Rock. Pronitschew ist Promotionsstipendiat des Ernst-Ludwig-Ehrlich-Studienwerks e. V. in Berlin.

11:30 Uhr
Rüdiger Ritter, Germany
Myths in jazz – artistic prison or productive element? Examples from East and East Central Europe

Die Geschichte des Jazz in Polen und anderen osteuropäischen Ländern wird oft als eine Abfolge von “Giganten des Jazz” erzählt, die sich mit ihren US-amerikanischen Vorbildern vergleichen ließen. In diesem Sinne war das höchste Lob für einen polnischen Musiker, als der “polnische Charlie Parker” bezeichnet zu werden. Rüdiger Ritter fragt, wie solch ein Verständnis von Jazzmusikern als nationale Helden die Position des Jazz als konstitutives Element polnischer Nationalkultur beeinflusste. Er diskutiert auch eine andere Art der Verwendung von Jazz-“Mythen” in der Sowjetunion und der Tschechoslowakei, wo Musiker den Jazz als eine Möglichkeit ansahen, ihre eigenen ästhetischen Ideen zu realisieren, ohne sich dabei auf spezifische Vorbilder zu beziehen. Das polnische Beispiel zeigt, dass das Festhalten am Mythos der “Giganten” nicht unbedingt ein ästhetisches Gefängnis sein muss, sondern durchaus zu kreativen Wegen des Musikmachens führen kann – und die Beispiele aus der Sowjetunion und aus der Tschechoslowakei zeigen, wie die Distanzierung von mythischen Jazz-Narrativen ein Maximum ästhetischer Möglichkeiten öffnet, wenn diese auch mit der Gefahr einhergehen, dass der Jazzgehalt der resultierenden Musik in Frage gestellt wird. Mythen im Jazz scheinen also sowohl produktive Elemente wie auch ein künstlerisches Gefängnis sein zu können.

Rüdiger Ritter ist Osteuropahistoriker und hat extensiv über die Jazzszene in den ehemaligen Ostblockstaaten publiziert. Er lehrt an der Universität Bremen, ist zugleich stellvertretender Leiter des Museums der 50er Jahre Bremerhaven. Ritter war Koordinator des Forschungsprojekts “Jazz im ‘Ostblock’ – Widerständigkeit durch Kulturtransfer”, und hat seine Habilitationsschrift über Willis Conover und die Auswirkungen seiner Jazzsendungen auf der Voice of America verfasst.

14:30 Uhr
Karen Chandler, USA
Bin Yah (Been Here). Africanisms and Jazz Influences in Gullah Culture

Musik, wie andere kulturelle Äußerungen auch, lebt in und von regionaler Verankerung in den Communities, in denen sie entsteht. Karen Chandler beschreibt die Afrikanismen, die sich in der Kultur der Gullahs und Geechees in der Küstenregion von South Carolina erhalten haben und die die Musik in Charleston maßgeblich beeinflussten. Die übliche Darstellung einer Jazzentwicklung entlang klarer geografischer Zentren (New Orleans, Chicago, New York, Kansas City, Los Angeles etc.) vergisst leicht die Komplexität einer Musik, die eben nicht einfach mal vor einhundert Jahren in New Orleans “erfunden” wurde, sondern die an vielen Orten, unter den unterschiedlichsten Bedingungen und von Menschen verschiedenster Herkunft ausgehandelt wurde.

Karen Chandler ist Direktorin des Studiengangs Arts Management am College of Charleston. Sie ist Mitgründerin der Charleston Jazz Initiative (CJI), eines mehrjährigen Forschungsprojekts zur Jazzgeschichte in Charleston und South Carolina. Zwischen 2001 und 2004 war sie außerdem Direktorin des Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture am College of Charleston.

15:30 Uhr
Scott DeVeaux, USA
An Alternative History of Bebop

Der Bebop hat eine Schlüsselstellung innerhalb der Jazzgeschichte inne. In den 1940er Jahren trafen Musiker Entscheidungen, die den Jazz klar von der populären Kultur trennten und ihn als ein neues und eigenständiges Genre definierten, eine Definition, die bis heute unser Verständnis vom Jazz prägt. Doch diese ästhetischen Zuweisungen, die noch aus der Bebop-Ära stammen, argumentiert Scott DeVeaux, lassen sich durchaus überdenken. Warum muss man Jazz als so klar von Tanz- oder populärer Musik getrennt betrachten? Warum muss das Jazzpublikum Instrumentalsolisten immer isoliert von anderen Genres statt in gemeinschaftlichen Projekten mit anderen Künstlern der Popkultur hören? DeVeaux untermauert seine Argumente mit musikalischen Beispielen aus der Gegenwart.

Scott DeVeaux ist ein bekannter Jazzforscher, dessen Buch The Birth of Bebop: A Social and Musical History (1997) den American Book Award, einen ASCAP–Deems Taylor Award, den Otto Kinkeldey Award der American Musicological Society, und den ARSC Award for Excellence in Historical Sound Research erhalten hat. Seit 1983 unterrichtet DeVeaux Jazzgeschichte an der University of Virginia.

16:30 Uhr
Nicolas Pillai, England
A Star Named Miles: tracking jazz musicians across media

Die Wahrnehmung der Jazzheroen wird durch viele Aspekte beeinflusst, von denen ihre Musik wirklich nur eine ist. Nicolas Pillai untersucht in seinem Beitrag verschiedene mediale Repräsentationen des Trompeters Miles Davis in seinen späteren Jahren, fragt nach dem “dissonanten Bild”, das diese geben, nach den Netzwerken der Musikindustrie, die seine Multi-Media-Persönlichkeit prägten, und letztlich auch danach, wie stark der Trompeter sein eigenes öffentliches Image etwa durch Attitüden, Sprache und Kleidung selbst mit beeinflusste.

Nicolas Pillai ist der Autor von Jazz as Visual Culture: Film, Television and the Dissonant Image (I. B. Tauris, 2017) und der Koautor von New Jazz Conceptions: History, Theory, Practice (Routledge, 2017). Mit Tim Wall und Roger Fagge gibt er eine in Kürze erscheinende Sammlung über Miles Davis heraus. Er hat Artikel über Jazz und Film in der Zeitschrift The Soundtrack sowie in dem Darmstädter Beiträgen zur Jazzforschung, 14, veröffentlicht. Zurzeit arbeitet er an Kapiteln für The Routledge Companion to New Jazz Studies, The Routledge Companion to Popular Music History and Heritage und The Oxford History of Jazz in Europe.

[:en]

Conference, 28 – 30 September 2017
Concerts, exhibition (September / October 2017)

In the centenary of jazz – the recordings of the Original Dixieland Jass Band from 1917 are often cited as the first jazz recordings ever – the Darmstadt Jazzforum conference looks at the pitfalls of jazz historiography, which often relies on myths and legends that distort what is even more important: the multi-perspectivity of a music which is being created not only by great masters, but certainly by many individualists.

In all of this, the 15th Darmstadt Jazzforum does not plan to re-write jazz historiography. During the international conference, during concerts and an exhibition, however, we hope for a lively discussion about how our understanding of the music, its history and its aesthetic has been shaped. We see jazz as a music with a history of more than a hundred years, and we know that it’s much more complex than history books usually tell us. Our objective is to unravel some more of this complexity, even though we know that we will only be scratching at the surface.

— — —

Conference/Short Overview
“Jazz @ 100. An alternative to a story of heroes”

On Thursday we will look at the perception of jazz history, its heroes and the places where it develops. For his book “American Jazz Heroes” the photographer and journalist Arne Reimer visited musicians in their personal homes, received intimate insights into their lives, and reflects about the difference between reality, self- and outside perception.  Nicholas Gebhardt reflects on Alan Lomax’s Library Of Congress recordings of Jelly Roll Morton in 1938 and connects them to broader issues in historiography, especially the relation between narrative, memory and the cultural imagination. Katherine  M. Leo ends the first day of the conference looking at the Original Dixieland Jazz Band whose recording of “Livery Stable Blues” and “Dixieland Jass Band One-Step” from 26 February 1917 is often cited as the first jazz record ever, and uses court documents for copyright lawsuits as well as a critical reading of the music’s reception to set the different narratives in perspective which the record evoked.

Six papers on Friday will focus on the changing perspectives on jazz and its history.  Klaus Frieler reports about an attempt to tell jazz history not just through a mixture of biographical, social and cultural context and musical characterizations but by using a computer-based analysis tool to approach solo improvisations. Andrew Hurley reads the different editions of Joachim Ernst Berendt’s influential “Jazzbuch”  (The Jazz Book), focusing on the author’s changed and changing attitudes and using this example to describe different methods of narrative formation. Tony Whyton discusses the influence of local and often very personal memories of musicians or promoters on the discourse about jazz as a trans-national practice. Mario Dunkel reads Darcy James Argue’s Secret Society as a attempt of imagining an alternative kind of jazz history and thus making room for a history of jazz as a story of both realized and unrealized potentialities. The pianist and composer Orrin Evans talks about jazz as a current and relevant art form as well as about (African-)American identity of the music in the context of a more and more complex global network.  Krin Gabbard looks at the film “Syncopation” from 1942 in order to ask how “new jazz studies” approaches can help analyze racial and economic ideologies and to emphasize the importance of not only concentrating on the (mostly male) heroes of the music.

The papers on Saturday will deal with the issue of major narratives in jazz, how it is being influenced by the music industry, how musicians have the power to change the historical narrative which involves them directly, and how all of such discourses influence the perception of the public. Wolfram Knauer looks at specific places where jazz is being performed, and asks about the effect of such often iconic venues with the music, the musicians, the jazz scene(s) and the public perception of the music. Oleg Pronitschew looks the increasing institutionalization of the German jazz scene during the last 40 years, discussing selected case studies and asking for its effect on the public image of the music. Rüdiger Ritter examines the idea of “jazz giants” in East and Central Europe and finds that myth in jazz can be a productive element and an artistic prison at the same time. Karen Chandler describes the influence of Gullah and Geechie culture on the coastal region of South Carolina and argues that a representation of jazz history along clear geographical centers can distort the much more complex notion of jazz as a musical as well as social practice. Scott DeVeaux revisits the birth of bebop, which provided the ideology for much of modern jazz, but asks us to reconsider whether the choices made by musicians in the 1940s should still govern contemporary music-making. Nicolas Pillai ends the 15th Darmstadt Jazzforum with a look at the representation of Miles Davis across different media, asking in which ways the late Miles created impact beyond his music.


Conference/Lecturers and Timetable
Jazz @ 100. An alternative to a story of heroes”

Thursday, 28 September 2017

2:00pm
Opening remarks

2:30pm
Arne Reimer, Germany
My Encounters with “American Jazz Heroes”

For his two coffee-table-sized books “American Jazz Heroes”, Arne Reimer visited older American jazz musicians at home, covering artists whose career proved to be financially successful as well as such who live under economically unstable conditions. At the Darmstadt Jazzforum Reimer asks how musicians deal both with the gap between their self- and their media perception, how they handle a lack of recognition or the fact that the most creative and successful part of their career might be long past. At the same time he reflects about his own approach as a photographer and journalist whose focus on these musicians will put them back into some sort of spotlight and thus create its own, new narrative about them.

Arne Reimer studied photography at the Academy of Fine Arts in Leipzig, Germany (HGB) as well as at Massachusetts College of Art in Boston, MA. He has taught for six years at the Academy of Fine Arts in Leipzig. His photos have been widely published; his two books “American Jazz Heroes” published in 2013 and 2016 have been praised and won several prizes, among them an 2017 Echo Jazz special award. Reimer also works as a curator and freelance photographer for magazines (Jazz Thing) and record companies (ECM Records).

3:30pm
Nicholas Gebhardt, England
Reality Remade: Historical Narrative and the Cultural Imagination in Alan Lomax’s Mister Jelly Roll

Nicolas Gebhardt looks at one of the first autobiographical documents on jazz, Jelly Roll Morton’s interview for the Library of Congress from 1938 and asks about the different perspectives reflected within this material: Morton’s view of his own role during the early history of the music, Alan Lomax’s editorial decisions and thus interpretation of the excerpts which he selected for the book “Mister Jelly Roll”, and our own approach as jazz researchers contextualizing musicians, their music, their living and working conditions in order to gain a more nuanced description of jazz history.

Nicholas Gebhardt is Professor of Jazz and Popular Music Studies at Birmingham City University in the United Kingdom. His work focuses on jazz and popular music in American culture, and his publications include Going For Jazz: Musical Practices and American Ideology (Chicago), The Cultural Politics of Jazz Collectives (Routledge) and Vaudeville Melodies: Popular Musicians and Mass Entertainment in American Culture, 1870-1929 (Chicago). He is the co-editor of the Routledge book series, Transnational Studies In Jazz and the forthcoming The Routledge Companion to Jazz Studies.

4:30pm
Katherine M. Leo, USA
The ODJB at 100: Revisiting Essential Narratives and Victor 18255

Katherine  M. Leo examines the self-portrayal as well as the public image of the Original Dixieland Jazz Band whose “Livery Stable Blues” and “Dixieland Jass Band One-Step” from 26 February 1917 often are called jazz history’s first recordings. She discovers that the band’s critical and public reception often is being reduced to this recording from 1917 and pleads for a more nuanced discussion not just of the music but also of the narrative which was attached to the ODJB over the last 100 years. Among the sources she uses for this reconsideration are court documents for copyright lawsuits  about exactly these two tunes.

Katherine M. Leo is an Assistant Professor in Musicology/Ethnomusicology at Millikin University, in Decatur, IL. Her research explores the intersection of American legal and music histories, with specific emphasis on early-twentieth-century popular musics. Having recently received her Ph.D. (2016) and J.D. (2015) from Ohio State, Katherine’s dissertation examined the history and nature of musical expertise in federal copyright litigation, while her masters’ research focused on notions of authorship surrounding the ODJB. Katherine has notably presented papers for the American Musicological Society and the Society for American Music, and will soon be published in the Journal of Music History Pedagogy.

— — —

Friday, 29 September 2017

9:30am
Klaus Frieler, Germany
A Feature History of Jazz Solo Improvisation

Klaus Frieler reports about an attempt to narrate jazz history not so much by mixing biographical accounts of eminent figures, descriptions of sociological and cultural context and genuine musical characterizations, but through the computer-based analysis of solo improvisations. For this he uses high-quality solo transcriptions from the Weimar Jazz Database as well as an analytical software developed for the Jazzomat Research Project which allows to search for a variety of characteristics such as scalar features, tonal and rhythmic complexity and other parameters. Frieler then discusses how such seemingly objective finds can be useful to describe the creative process and looks at potential future extensions to the project.

Klaus Frieler graduated in theoretical physics (diploma) and received a PhD in systematic musicology in 2008 from the University of Hamburg. He worked as a freelance software developer for several years, before taking up a post as a lecturer in systematic musicology at the University of Hamburg in 2008. In 2012, he spent a brief period at the Centre for Digital Music, Queen Mary University of London. Since autumn 2012, he has been working as a post-doctoral researcher with the Jazzomat Research Project at the University of Music “Franz Liszt” Weimar. His main research interests are computational and statistical music psychology with a focus on creativity, melody perception, singing intonation, and jazz research. Since 2006, he has also been working as an independent music expert specializing in copyright cases. See http://www.mu-on.org for more information.

10:30am

Andrew Hurley, Australia
In and Out: Processes of Inclusion and Exclusion in Joachim-Ernst Berendt’s Jazzbuch/Jazzbook, 1953-2011

For German jazz fans the books written by Joachim Ernst Berendt were a major point of reference. Andrew Hurley reads the different editions of “The Jazz Book” from 1953 up to the presently available edition and discovers shifts in narrative perspective and elisions. He discusses what the decisions about which narratives to use (or not) tell us about changing concepts of jazz historiography. In a close reading of “The Jazz Book”, Hurley discovers how narratives establish themselves, how alternative readings are suppressed or emerge, and how the quarrel between narratives can change perceptions of apparent reality.

Andrew W. Hurley is Associate Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Technology, Sydney, where he teaches in the International Studies programme. He is the author of two monographs: The Return of Jazz: Joachim-Ernst Berendt and West German Cultural Change (Berghahn, 2011) and Into The Groove:  Popular Music and Contemporary German Fiction (Boydell & Brewer, 2015)

11:30am
Tony Whyton, England
Wilkie’s story: hidden musicians, cosmopolitan connections, and dominant jazz histories

Tony Whyton discovered a box full of memorabilia by a distant family member documenting his connections within the British jazz scene since the mid-1920s. Using this example, Whyton discusses the hidden histories of musicians and the role they play in the ecologies of jazz. Archival materials such as these comment on the inter-relationship between dominant jazz narratives and other cosmopolitan connections. They can enable us to start a conversation about the realities of the jazz world, the connectedness of people in different cultural settings, and the development of jazz as a transnational practice.

Tony Whyton is Professor of Jazz Studies at BCU. His critically acclaimed books Jazz Icons: Heroes, Myths and the Jazz Tradition (Cambridge University Press, 2010) and Beyond A Love Supreme: John Coltrane and the Legacy of an Album (Oxford University Press, 2013) have sought to develop cross-disciplinary methods of musical enquiry. As an editor, Whyton published the Jazz volume of the Ashgate Library of Essays on Popular Music in 2011 and continues to work as co-editor of the Jazz Research Journal (Equinox). In 2014, he founded the new Routledge series ‘Transnational Studies in Jazz’ alongside BCU colleague Dr Nicholas Gebhardt. Gebhardt and Whyton also edited The Cultural Politics of Jazz Collectives: This Is Our Music (Routledge) in 2015, a collection that explores the ways in which musician-led collectives offer a powerful model for rethinking jazz practices in the post-war period. From 2010-2013, Whyton was Project Leader for the ground-breaking HERA-funded Rhythm Changes: Jazz Cultures and European Identities project (www.rhythmchanges.net), where he led a consortium of 13 researchers working across 7 Universities in 5 countries.

2:30pm

Mario Dunkel, Germany
Darcy James Argue’s Uchronic Jazz

Mario Dunkel presents the latest project of composer and bandleader Darcy James Argue as an attempt to investigate an alternative history of jazz by, for instance, asking how big band music might sound if it had stayed popular and incorporated many of the popular genres that have emerged since, including rock, grunge, steampunk, and hip hop. By asking what might have been, argues Dunkel, Argue provides a new perspective on what was, and on what was not, making room for a history of jazz as a story of both realized and unrealized potentialities.

Mario Dunkel is assistant professor (Juniorprofessor) at the Music Department of the Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg. His research interests include transcultural music education, the history of jazz, and the practice of music diplomacy.

3:30pm
Orrin Evans, USA
A Talk with Orrin Evans

As a pianist and composer Orrin Evans who lives in Philadelphia is very much a part of today’s New York jazz scene. For the Darmstadt Jazzforum he shares his view of jazz as a relevant art form, talks about improvisation as a road to artistic identity in jazz history, as well as about the changes of jazz from an (African-)American music towards a complex global art form which developed quite varied practices that at times seem to be difficult to subsume under the same term.

Since 1995 pianist and composer Orrin Evans has recorded more than 25 albums as a leader or co-leader and performed on numerous others. He came up in the culturally rich jazz scene of Philadelphia where he still lives although he plays in New York (and elsewhere) on a weekly basis. Evans performs with his trio, his band Tarbaby or his Captain Black Big Band. From early 2018 he will replace Ethan Iverson in the trio The Bad Plus. Orrin Evans will perform a solo piano concert at the Darmstadt Jazzforum on Saturday evening.

4:30pm
Krin Gabbard, USA
Syncopated Women

Krin Gabbard picks up discussion of our last Darmstadt Jazzforum in his presentation when he asks, after a close reading of William Dieterle’s film “Syncopation” from 1942, how specific representations of jazz and jazz history reflect racial, gender, and economic ideologies.  Unlike virtually every other jazz film of the 1940s, “Syncopation” acknowledges slavery as a crucial element in jazz history.  It is also unique in distinguishing between the economies of black and white jazz bands.  In addition, the film has an unusually ambivalent view of the participation of women in the music’s development.  Using the example of “Syncopation”, Gabbard argues that the “new jazz studies” can provide a rich conception of jazz histories and how these traditions have been understood.

Krin Gabbard is Professor of Jazz Studies and director of the J-Disc, the jazz discography project at Columbia University. His books include Jammin’ at the Margins: Jazz and the American Cinema (University of Chicago Press, 1996), Black Magic: White Hollywood and African American Culture (Rutgers University Press, 2004), and Better Git It in Your Soul: An Interpretive Biography of Charles Mingus (University of California Press, 2016). He is also the editor of Jazz Among the Discourses (Duke University Press, 1995).

— — —

Saturday, 30 September 2017

9:30am

Wolfram Knauer, Germany
Four Sides of a House. How jazz spaces irritate, fascinate, stimulate creativity or become icons

Wolfram Knauer looks at the ideal room for jazz from different perspectives. There are venues with an excellent acoustic, clubs with their own aura (often soaked in jazz history), halls where one can literally hear everything, and others that offer an intimate connection between the artists and their audience. Knauer looks at several examples to speculate about different conceptions of what might constitute an ideal room for jazz. He discusses the involvement of such venues with local and regional scenes, and he asks how changes in the presentation and reception can be both seen as a chance and as a threat to established local activities because (a) they indeed have an impact on the perception of the music, and because (b) new venues will also change the general expectation of the audience in regard to the music they are going to hear.

Wolfram Knauer is the director of the Jazzinstitut Darmstadt since its inception in 1990. He is the editor of Darmstadt Studies in Jazz Research (14 volumes till now, Wolke 1890-2016) has published several books, among them critical studies of Louis Armstrong (Reclam 2010) and Charlie Parker (Reclam 2014). A study of Duke Ellington and his music will be published in 2017 (Reclam). He has taught at several schools and universities and was appointed the first non-American Louis Armstrong Professor of Jazz Studies at the Center for Jazz Studies, Columbia University, New York, for spring 2008.

10:30am
Oleg Pronitschew, Germany
A New Place for Jazz. Insights Into the Historic Institutionalization of German Jazz Music.

Oleg Pronitschew looks at the institutionalization of the German jazz scene during the last 40 years and asks what effect it had on the public image of the music. He describes how jazz was more and more seen as a form of art music and discusses how as a result the aesthetic, social as well as commercial expectations have changed that both musicians, the industry and the audience directed towards the music.

Oleg Pronitschew is an European Ethnologist and PhD candidate at the Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel. He has studied European Ethnology, Political Science and New German Literature and Media Studies at the CAU Kiel from 2005 to 2011. He was as a lecturer at the Department of European Ethnology in Kiel from 2011 to 2013. Currently he is finishing his PhD project on the topic of jazz/popular musicians as a cultural practice between imagination and valuation. He is a PhD-fellow of the Ernst-Ludwig-Ehrlich-trust in Berlin since 2014.

11:30am
Rüdiger Ritter, Germany
Myths in jazz – artistic prison or productive element? Examples from East and East Central Europe

The history of jazz in Poland and other East European countries was often presented as a succession of national “jazz greats” who could be compared with their US-American counterparts. Thus, the highest praise for a Polish musician might have been to be described as the “Polish Charlie Parker”. Rüdiger Ritter asks how such a view of jazz musicians as national heroes influenced the role of jazz as a constitutive moment of Polish national culture. He also discusses a different kind of identification with jazz “myths” in the Soviet Union and in Czechoslovakia where musicians saw jazz as an option to realize one’s own aesthetic ideas without seeking out specific role models. The Polish example demonstrates that clinging to the “giant” myth does not necessarily have to be an aesthetic prison, but can offer creative paths to music-making as well – and the Soviet and Czechoslovakian examples show how rejecting the mythical jazz narratives allowed for a maximum of aesthetic possibilities, even though these came with the danger of the music being questioned as to its jazz content. Myths in jazz, then, seem to be a productive element and an artistic prison as well.

Rüdiger Ritter is an expert on Eastern Europe and has published extensively about jazz in countries of the former Eastern bloc. He teaches at the University of Bremen; at the same time he is assistant director of the Museum of the 1950s in Bremerhaven. Ritter was coordinator for the research project “Jazz in the Eastern Bloc”, and has written his habilitation dissertation about Willis Conover and the effect of his jazz radio broadcasts.

2:30pm
Karen Chandler, USA
Bin Yah (Been Here). Africanisms and Jazz Influences in Gullah Culture

Music like most cultural expressions is based in regional networks, in the communities in which they serve specific functions. Karen Chandler describes some of the Africanisms which survived in the Gullah and Geechee culture of the coastal region of South Carolina and which strongly influenced the music in Charleston. Jazz history is often told by focusing on clear geographical centers (New Orleans, Chicago, New York, Kansas City, Los Angeles etc.), a narrative that thus blurs the real complexity of a music which, after all, was not just “invented” a hundred years ago but is the result of cultural negotiations between people of different origins in different places and under different conditions.

Karen Chandler is the Director of the Arts Management program at the College of Charleston. She is also Co-Founder/Principal of the Charleston Jazz Initiative (CJI), a multi-year study of the jazz tradition in Charleston and South Carolina. From 2001-2004, she served as director of the College of Charleston’s Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture.

3:30pm
Scott DeVeaux, USA
An Alternative History of Bebop

Bebop was a crucial moment in jazz history.  In the 1940s, musicians made choices that separated jazz from popular culture and defined it as a new and distinct genre, one that still governs our sense of jazz today.  Yet, as Scott DeVeaux notes, the assumptions underlying bebop can be reconsidered.  Why should jazz be seen as separate from dance and popular song? Why should jazz audiences insist on hearing instrumental improvisers in isolation, instead of encouraging collaborations with other spheres of pop culture? He will illustrate with examples from contemporary music.

Scott DeVeaux is a nationally recognized jazz scholar whose 1997 book The Birth of Bebop: A Social and Musical History won the American Book Award, an ASCAP–Deems Taylor Award, the Otto Kinkeldey Award from the American Musicological Society, and the ARSC Award for Excellence in Historical Sound Research. He has taught jazz history at the University of Virginia since 1983.

4:30pm
Nicolas Pillai, England
A Star Named Miles: tracking jazz musicians across media

The perception of jazz heroes is influenced by many aspects, music being just one of them. In the final presentation of our conference, Nicolas Pillai looks at the media representation of trumpeter Miles Davis in his later years, and describes “the dissonant image” of his appearances in film, television drama, music videos, fashion magazines and TV advertising. He considers the industry networks which formed Miles’ multi-media personality, taking into account the trumpeter’s own influence on his public image, discussing gesture, speech and costume.

Nicolas Pillai is the author of Jazz as Visual Language: Film, Television and the Dissonant Image (I. B. Tauris, 2017) and the co-editor of New Jazz Conceptions: History, Theory, Practice (Routledge, 2017). With Tim Wall and Roger Fagge, he is preparing an edited collection on late Miles Davis. He has published work on jazz and film in The Soundtrack journal and Darmstadt Studies in Jazz, 14. He is currently working on chapters for The Routledge Companion to New Jazz Studies, The Routledge Companion to Popular Music History and Heritage and The Oxford History of Jazz in Europe.

[:]

[:de]15. Darmstädter Jazzforum[:en]15th Darmstadt Jazzforum[:]

[:de]

Jazz @ 100 | (K)eine Heldengeschichte

Vorträge, Diskussionen, Dokumentationen & Musik zum 15. Darmstädter Jazzforum vom 28. bis 30. September 2017

Wissenschaftler, Journalisten, Musiker und Zuhörer diskutieren vor dem Hintergrund des 100sten Jubiläums der vermeintlich ersten Jazzaufnahme 1917 über verschobene Perspektiven der Jazzgeschichtsschreibung und warum es trotzdem so schwierig zu sein scheint, ohne name-dropping à la „New Orleans“, „Chicago“, „Louis Armstrong“, „Miles“, „Bird“ und „Ella“ über diese in der ganzen Welt verbreiteten und geliebten Musik zu schreiben und zu sprechen. Beim 15. Darmstädter Jazzforum sollen diese Themen aus unterschiedlichster Warte behandelt weden.

Dabei wollen wir die Jazzgeschichte nicht neu schreiben. In der internationalen  Konferenz, in Konzerten und einer Ausstellung hoffen wir allerdings auf eine lebendige Diskussion darüber, wie unser Verständnis von dieser Musik, ihrer Geschichte und ihrer Ästhetik geprägt wurde. Wir verstehen den Jazz als eine Musik mit einer mehr als hundertjährigen Geschichte, und wir wissen, dass diese weit komplexer ist, als die Geschichtsbücher uns das meistens wahrmachen wollen. Unser Ziel ist es, ein wenig von dieser Komplexität zu entwirren, wohl wissend, dass wir damit höchstens an der Oberfläche kratzen werden.

Daneben gewährt eine  Ausstellung mit Fotos von Arne Reimer einen Blick “hinter die Kulissen” des “öffentlichen” Jazzlebens von Musiker/innen und drei abendliche Konzerte von Musikern, die auch bei der Konferenz zu Wort kommen, runden die Veranstaltung ab. Die Konferenz selbst ist öffentlich und bei freiem Eintritt. Konfernzsprache ist Englisch. Um unverbindliche Anmeldung wird gebeten.

Details zur Konferenz “Jazz @ 100 | (K)eine Heldengeschichte”
Details zum Konzert mit dem Kirk Lightsey Quintet feat. Paul Zauner
Details zum Konzert mit dem Julia Hülsmann Oktett
Details zum Konzert mit Orrin Evans
Details zur Ausstellung “My Encounters with ‘American Jazz Heroes'”

Donnerstag, 28. bis Samstag, 30. September, Konferenz und Ausstellung im Literaturhaus, Konzerte in der Centralstation und in der Bessunger Knabenschule

Wir bedanken uns bei unseren Partnern und Förderern

Überregionale Medienpartner sind der Hessische Rundfunk mit seinem Kulturprogramm hr2-Kultur, der erneut das „Darmstädter Jazzforum“ präsentiert und unter anderem Mitschnitte und Sendungen zum Darmstädter Jazzforum plant sowie die Zeitschrift Jazzthetik.

Wie auch schon in den vergangenen Jahren unterstützt das Hessische Ministe­rium für Wissenschaft und Kunst and Kulturfonds Frankfurt RheinMain gGmbH das 15. Darmstädter Jazzforum. Weitere Förderung kommt von der Sparkassenkulturstiftung Hessen-Thüringen and Sparkasse Darmstadt. Dadurch werden z.B. zeitgemäße Produktions-, Werbe- und Dokumentationskonzepte umgesetzt, die mit dem üblichen Budget des Jazzinsti­tuts Darmstadt nicht realisiert werden können – bei einer national und international beachteten Veranstaltung wie dem Darmstädter Jazzforum aber unverzichtbar sind.[:en]

Jazz @ 100 | An alternative to a story of heroes

Conference, Concerts, exhibition, 28 – 30 September 2017

Details about the conference “Jazz @ 100 | An alternative to a story of heroes”
Details about the concert with the Kirk Lightsey Quintet feat. Paul Zauner
Details about the concert with the Julia Hülsmann Octet

Details about the concert with Orrin Evans
Details about the exhibition “My Encounters with ‘American Jazz Heroes'”

In the centenary of jazz ­– the recordings of the Original Dixieland Jass Band from 1917 are often cited as the first jazz recordings ever – the Darmstadt Jazzforum conference looks at the pitfalls of jazz historiography, which often relies on myths and legends that distort what is even more important: the multi-perspectivity of a music which is being created not only by great masters, but certainly by many individualists.

In all of this, the 15th Darmstadt Jazzforum does not plan to re-write jazz historiography. During the international conference, during concerts and an exhibition, however, we hope for a lively discussion about how our understanding of the music, its history and its aesthetic has been shaped. We see jazz as a music with a history of more than a hundred years, and we know that it’s much more complex than history books usually tell us. Our objective is to unravel some more of this complexity, even though we know that we will only be scratching at the surface. We do not just want to look at the past, either, but are just as much interested in papers that focus on today’s developments and their significance in the cultural discourse jazz always was a part of.

The Darmstadt Jazzforum will focus on different aspects of jazz historiography, such as:

Places:
Jazz historiography mostly talks of major cities, of New Orleans, Chicago or New York, of Paris, London or Berlin. An alternative reading might identify other places (such as Charleston, St. Louis, Los Angeles or Lyon, Leeds, Wuppertal) and link these to specific events, movements, or group activities. An alternative reading might also stress the fact that any fixation of cultural activity to a specific place forgets aspects of mobility which are important in a music dealing mostly with cultural encounters. How do “scenes” and connections between scenes work? What does the historigraphic choice of focusing on a specific “place” or the deliberate negation of geographical positioning mean for our understanding of jazz? And what are the specific connections between locations and the music itself?

People:
Jazz historiography often talks about successful or tragic heroes. An alternative reading might move other protagonists into the focus, might talk about temporary networks which enable artistic developments but are much more than mere musical relationships. An alternative reading should not necessarily question the importance of the great personalities but ask what kind of an example they set and/or what examples might have been alternatives from a very different direction. Focusing on people in jazz one needs to ask about the concept of artistic or commercial “success”; one needs to look at the processual aspects of improvisation (as opposed to the “Werk” aesthetic which shines through in most artists’ discographies); and one needs to look at the involvement of artists in the cultural discourses of their direct environments (community, city, scene, politics).

Style:
It seems like those lucky days when jazz history could easily be categorized with clear stylistic distinctions are over since the 1970s. And yet we often search for new descriptions to sum up more recent developments. The designation of stylistic names may be helpful for talking about music, but is it a suitable procedure in the internet era in which genre-hopping is the rule for a whole generation? The discussion about “genre” or “style” needs to take into consideration how such terms and categories have been canonized in the past and are being used in the present, by the music press, the industry, by fans as well as even by those pretending not to like jazz (Branford Marsalis: “People think if nobody sings it’s jazz.”). When questioning the illusion of genre purity, one has to ask about the general necessity  for categories in the first place and speculate about a future with no need to “file under…”

Presentations, Discussions, Concerts, Exhibition

At the 15th Darmstadt Jazzforum all of these topics are addressed by scholars from different disciplines, by journalists and by musicians. An exhibition with photos by Arne Reimer allows a “view behind the scenes” of the public life of jazz musicians. Three concerts will complete the event (and some of the musicians will also talk at the conference). Attending the conference is free. We ask, though, for informal registration.

More about the 15th Darmstadt Jazzforum about “Jazz @ 100. An alternative to a story of heroes” (concerence program, information about the concerts and the exhibition) will be online here in late May.

PS: The language at the Darmstadt Jazzforum conference is English.[:]

[:de]14. Darmstädter Jazzforum[:en]14th Darmstadt Jazzforum [:]

[:de]

A4_header_jazzforum_2015_0615_2

Konferenz, Ausstellung, Workshop, Konzerte
Gender und Identität im Jazz

Die Referent/innen und die Themen ihrer Vorträge sind hier zu finden.

Einführung

Der Jazz war lange Zeit eine Männermusik. Nicht nur waren die meisten der stilbildenden Musiker männlichen Geschlechts, auch seine Ästhetik und sein soziales Umfeld waren männlich dominiert und männlich besetzt. Frauen spielten in der öffentlichen Wahrnehmung des Jazz, aber auch im Selbstverständnis dieser Musik bei den ausübenden Künstlern eine genauso geringe Rolle wie andere, dem männerbündnerischen Ursprung dieser Musik nicht passende Identitätsbilder. Starke, individuelle, ihre eigene Stimme suchende und findende Frauen oder gar Musiker oder Musikerinnen, die nicht dem anderen, sondern dem eigenen Geschlecht zugeneigt waren, wurden lange Zeit entweder ausgegrenzt, als Ausnahme abgetan oder als Feigenblatt für eine postulierte Offenheit dieser Musik genutzt.

Das 14. Darmstädter Jazzforum, das zugleich ein Vierteljahrhundert Jazzinstitut feiert, will sich dem Thema “Gender”, von verschiedenen Seiten nähern. Uns ist bewusst, dass es genauso wenig “weiblichen Jazz” gibt wie “männlichen”, dass Musik an und für sich weder Geschlecht noch sexuelle Orientierung besitzt. Und doch spielt die Identität, die wir in unser jeweiligen Umwelt entwickelt haben und leben, eine wichtige Rolle sowohl dabei, wie wir kreativ tätig sind, als auch, wie wir über Kunst oder Musik nachdenken, welche Assoziationen wir mit verschiedenen Genres, wenn nicht gar spezifischen Klängen haben. “I don’t care whom you’re screwing”, stellte der Pianist Orrin Evans im September letzten Jahres beim ersten “Queer Jazz Festival” in Philadelphia fest, “as long as you’re screwing somebody” – Musik handle nun mal vom Zwischenmenschlichen; sie sei also nichts für Eremiten.

Wie aber bestimmt unsere Identität unser Verhältnis zur Musik bzw. zum Jazz? Oder noch konkreter: Ist Jazz wirklich eine Männermusik? Und wenn, woher kommen dann seine scheinbaren maskulinen Attribute? Spielt die Betonung von “masculinity” in der afro-amerikanischen Gesellschaft eine Rolle bei der Ausprägung maskuliner Haltungen im Jazz? Wie lässt sich eine solche Haltung näher festmachen – und wie übersetzt sie sich in andere Kultursphären? Warum beispielsweise wirkt sich die Auflösung maskuliner Werteschemata in der globalen Popkultur seit den 1970er Jahren nicht stärker auf die Wahrnehmung des Jazz aus? Oder tut sie genau dies und es fällt uns im Wandel der Werte einfach nicht genügend auf? Welche musikalischen Qualitäten sind denn tatsächlich identitätsbestimmt (um es vorsichtig auszudrücken und etwa nicht von “geschlechterspezifisch” zu sprechen)? Dass es unterschiedliche geschlechterspezifische Herangehensweisen an Projekte genauso wie an Problemlösungen gibt, ist ja hinreichend bekannt, wie aber drücken solche sich in Musik aus? Spielen Männer konfrontativer, Frauen eher auf Konsens bedacht? Sind Begriffe wie “einfühlsam” oder “kraftvoll” automatisch auch geschlechterbestimmte Vokabeln? Wie sieht die Selbst- und die Fremdsicht auf dieses Thema aus? Wie diskutiert man das Phänomen, dass ein Musiker wie Gary Burton erkläre, er mache selbstverständlich keinen “gay jazz”, und dennoch erzählt, nach seinem Coming Out hätten ihm viele Kollegen gesagt, er spiele jetzt viel “freier?

Wie also nimmt man die Rollen, die man in der realen Welt spielt, mit in eine Kunst, die zum einen davon handelt, “sich selbst” zu spielen, zum anderen auf offene Kommunikation klarer Individuen angelegt ist? Denn ausgerechnet im Jazz, dieser über-individualisierten Musik, zu argumentieren, dass es doch völlig egal sei, woher man käme, wirkt seltsam. “Where you come from is where you go to”, lautet zumindest zum Teil die Devise: Wer du bist, bestimmt, was und wie du spielen wirst.

Für unser 14. Darmstädter Jazzforum wollen wir diesen komplexen Themenkreis von sehr unterschiedlichen Warten betrachten. Wir haben dafür drei Themenblöcke vorgesehen. (1) Zum einen wollen wir uns allgemein mit der Thematik Maskulinität / Gender / Intersektionalität / Identität befassen. (2) Wir laden Referenten und Referentinnen ein, sich in analytischen Case Studies an die musikalische Aktivität einzelner Musiker oder Musikerinnen anzunähern, ohne von vornherein nur auf den Genderaspekt ihrer Kunst zu blicken. (3) In einem dritten Block wollen wir schließlich Schlaglichter auf gelebte Wirklichkeit in Geschichte wie Gegenwart werfen, uns dafür fokussierte Blicke in die Jazzgeschichte erlauben, aber auch aktuelle Zeitzeugen zu Worte kommen lassen.

Dass der Blick auf den Jazz verfälscht wird, wenn man seine Protagonisten auf einzelne Teile ihrer vielfältigen Identität reduziert, ist klar. Diese jedoch in Jazzgeschichte und -gegenwart völlig außer Acht zu lassen, ist ein genauso großes Versäumnis. Beim 14. Darmstädter Jazzforum wollen wir einen Diskurs fortführen, der auch in unserer bereits erheblich veränderten Welt wichtig bleibt.

Please find Darmstadt Jazzforum on Facebook    GENDER_IDENTITY


„GENDER_IDENTITY“ ist eine Veranstaltung des Jazzinstituts Darmstadt, eines Kulturinstituts der Wissenschaftsstadt Darmstadt.

Logo_JazzDa_4c          A5_Darmstadt-Logo_rgb-3c

Das 14. Darmstädter Jazzforum wird gefördert vom Kulturfonds Frankfurt Rhein-Main, vom Hessischen Ministerium für Wissenschaft und Kunst und der Jubiläumsstiftung der Sparkasse Darmstadt.

KFFRM_logo_blau        hessisches_min_wiku     JUBI LOGO

hr2 Kultur, JAZZTHETIK und MELODIVA sind Medienpartner des 14. Darmstädter Jazzforums

hr2_logo_neu.ai     JT_box_purple    LogoMelo_orange

Kooperationspartner des 14. Darmstädter Jazzforums sind „Frauen machen Musik e.V.“, das Kulturzentrum Bessunger Knabenschule, WAGGONG Frankfurt e.V., die Centralstation Darmstadt und die Frankfurter Romanfabrik

Logo_BKS_orange     waggong      CS_Entega_pos_2014      romanfabrik[:en]

A4_header_jazzforum_2015_0615_2

Conference, exhibition, workshop, concerts
Gender and Identity in Jazz

Darmstadt Jazzforum 2015 GENDER_IDENTITY from Jazzinstitut Darmstadt on Vimeo.

The speakers have been chosen; here is an overview of the papers.

Introduction

Jazz used to be a predominantly male music. Not only were most of the musicians male, but its aesthetics and social environment was dominated by male ideals and male players as well. In the public perception of this music women as well as other groups or identities not compliant with the male orientation of jazz’s origins played only a minor role. Strong female instrumental voices, for instance, or musicians with a LGBT background were marginalized both by the media and by the jazz scene, seen as an exception or celebrated as a fig-leaf for the alleged openness of the music.

Celebrating the Jazzinstitut’s 25th anniversary, the 14th Darmstadt Jazzforum will approach the gender topic from different sides. We are aware of the fact that there is no “female jazz” or “male jazz”, that music in itself does neither have a gender nor a sexual orientation. And yet our identity which we acquired in our respective environments are highly influential on how we express our creativity, how we think about art and music, which associations we may have with specific genres if not even with specific sounds. “I don’t care whom you’re screwing”, said the pianist Orrin Evans in September 2014 at the first “Queer Jazz Festival” in Philadelphia, “as long as you’re screwing somebody” – music, after all, is a taking place between people, it’s not a hermit’s art.

How, then, is our identity forming our understanding of jazz? Or to be even more precise: Is jazz really a man’s music? And if so, where exactly do its male attributes come from? Is some kind of emphasis on masculinity in the African-American community one of the reasons for the stereotype of jazz as a male art form? How can such an attitude be described – and how does it translate into other cultures? Why, for instance, doesn’t the slow softening of masculine values in global pop music since the 1970s have a stronger effect on jazz? Or is this actually happening and we just don’t notice it because of the general changes we experience around us? Are there musical qualities which are determined through identity (if not through gender)? We know about and acknowledge gender-typical approaches and methods of problem-solving in many other fields; can we identify such in music? Do men play more aggressively, are women more anxious to reach a consensus? Are words such as “empathetic” or “forceful” clearly linked to specific gender characteristics? What is the difference between the self-view and the independent view of this topic? How does one deal with the phenomenon that a musician such as Gary Burton makes clear that, of course, he does not play “gay jazz”, yet acknowledges that after his coming-out many of his colleagues told him he sounded much “freer”?

How, then, does one take the roles one is playing in the real world along into an art form which is about “playing yourself” on the one hand and which deals with an open kind of communication of specific individuals on the other hand? Jazz, after all, is one of the most individual approaches in the music field; it seems odd to argue that one’s personal background has no influence whatsoever on the musical result. “Where you come from is where you go to”, is at least part of the rule: Whoever you are, will define what and how you will play and perform.

At our 14th Darmstadt Jazzforum we plan to look at different views on this complex field of topics. We will focus on three thematic blocks. (1) We will discuss topics such as masculinity / gender / intersectionality / identity. (2) We will invite some analytical case studies, in which the art of specific musicians is being approached without first looking at the gender aspect of their music. (3) A third block is to bring us into the lived-in reality both of days gone by and of today’s world, allow for focused views into jazz history and for conversations with men and women active on today’s jazz scene.

The view of jazz musicians and their art may be distorted if we reduce them to any parts of their identity, be it their gender, their sexual orientation, their ethnicity, or anything else. However, to ignore these facets, be it in jazz history or today’s jazz scene, is a proof of neglect as well. At the 14th Darmstadt Jazzforum we hope to contribute to a discourse which is and remains important in our changing modern world.

Please find Darmstadt Jazzforum on Facebook    GENDER_IDENTITY


„GENDER_IDENTITY“ is hosted by the Jazzinstitut Darmstadt, a cultural institution of the City of Science Darmstadt.

Logo_JazzDa_4c          A5_Darmstadt-Logo_rgb-3c

The 14. Darmstädter Jazzforum is fonded by the Kulturfonds Frankfurt Rhein-Main, the  Hessischen Ministerium für Wissenschaft und Kunst and the jubilee-foundation of the Sparkasse Darmstadt.

KFFRM_logo_blau        hessisches_min_wiku     JUBI LOGO

hr2 Kultur, JAZZTHETIK and MELODIVA are media partners of the 14. Darmstädter Jazzforums

hr2_logo_neu.ai     JT_box_purple    LogoMelo_orange

We are co-operating for the 14. Darmstädter Jazzforums with the „Frauen machen Musik e.V.“, the Kulturzentrum Bessunger Knabenschule, WAGGONG Frankfurt e.V., the Centralstation Darmstadt and the Romanfabrik in Frankfurt/Main

Logo_BKS_orange     waggong      CS_Entega_pos_2014      romanfabrik[:]

[:de]Gender und Identität im Jazz[:en]Gender and Identity in Jazz[:]

[:de]A4_header_jazzforum_2015_0615_2

Programmübersicht

(Alle Referate des 14. Darmstädter Jazzforums – bis auf die drei am Vormittag des 3. Oktober – werden auf Englisch gehalten.)

FREITAG, 18. September 2015
Eröffnungsveranstaltung im Jazzinstitut, 20:30 Uhr

JazzTalk 109 mit “Playground”

mit Stephanie Wagner (fl), Esther Bächlin (p,voc), Gina Schwarz (b), Lars Binder (dr)

Playground 1Bei der Hessischen Frauenmusikwoche 2014 lernten sich die 3 Musikerinnen Stephanie Wagner (fl-Darmstadt), Esther Bächlin (p/voc-Luzern) und Gina Schwarz (b-Wien) als Dozentinnen kennen. Nach dem Dozentenkonzert waren sie von ihrem gemeinsamen Interplay so begeistert, dass sie beschlossen, eine neue Formation zu gründen, welche sie nun wahlweise mit kongenialen MitmusikerInnen erweitern.

Die Eigenkompositionen der 3 Musikerinnen ergänzen sich hierbei aufs Beste: eine impressionistische, farbenreiche Harmonik mit Tendenz zu dunkleren Schattierungen, verschlungene filigrane Melodien, luftige ungerade Rhythmen sowie sperrige Grooves – der reichhaltige musikalische Spielplatz wird von der Band lustvoll ausgelotet, die Spielideen in großen Spannungsbögen weiter gesponnen. Jenseits von Klischees entsteht ein intelligentes kollektives Interplay, das mit sprudelnden Soli wechselt und die Zuhörenden in den Sog des kreativen Augenblicks hineinzieht: Musik zwischen Freiraum und Verdichtung, Puls und Atem!

Stephanie Wagner ist eine der wenigen Jazzflötist/innen Deutschlands, nahm gerade mit ihrem Quintett “Stephanie Wagners Quinsch” die zweite CD auf; außerdem erschien gerade ihre Schule für Jazz-Flöte (Schott-Verlag). Esther Bächlin widmet sich mit diesem Projekt wieder ganz dem Contemporary Jazz, nachdem sie ein paar Jahre vornehmlich ihre eigenen spartenübergreifende Improvisations-Projekte, u.a. mit Lauren Newton vorantrieb. Die Wiener Bassistin Gina Schwarz hat kürzlich ihr vielbeachtetes Album “Jazzista” auf Unit Records herausgebracht und Anfang des Jahres eine Tournee mit dem amerikanischen Schlagzeuger Jim Black gespielt. Der Schlagzeuger Lars Binder ist in Deutschland bekannt u.a. durch das Cécile Verny- Quartett und dem Quintett L14,16. Er ergänzt und bereichert das Trio durch sein dynamisch differenziertes, kreatives und variantenreiches Spiel, das gleichermassen Tradition und Moderne verinnerlicht.


Spontaneous. Female. Genuine

Ausstellung in der Galerie des Jazzinstituts
September bis Dezember 2015

In der spartenübergreifenden Ausstellung Spontaneous_Female_Genuine stehen vier Jazzmusikerinnen aus verschiedenen Ländern, Zeiten und stilistischen Richtungen im Fokus: Die amerikanische “First Lady of Jazz” Ella Fitzgerald, die deutsche Hammondorgel-Virtuosin Barbara Dennerlein, die deutsch-polnische Energy-Saxophonistin Angelika Niescier und die Schweizer Freejazz-Pianistin Irène Schweizer. Die Ausstellung zeigt vier Lebens- und Künstlerinnengeschichten fernab aller Klischees von “Frauenjazz” – eine spannende Entdeckungsreise auf Fotos, Filmen, Covers und Postern in die unterschiedlichen Welten der Jazzmusik.

Ausstellung in der Galerie des Jazzinstituts vom 18. September bis 4. Dezember 2015
Ausstellungseröffnung am Samstag, den 19. September 2015
Geöffnet: MO, DI, DO 10 bis 17 Uhr, FR 10 bis 14 Uhr
Eintritt frei


FREITAG, 2. BIS SONNTAG, 4. Oktober 2015
Workshop in der Kulturwerkstatt Germaniastraße, Frankfurt/Main, ganztags

mit Esther Bächlin, Gina Schwarz, Stephanie Wagner

weitere Informationen unter www.waggong.de

waggong    LogoMelo_orange   Logo_JazzDa_4c


DONNERSTAG, 1. Oktober 2015
Literaturhaus, Kasinostraße 3
Eintritt frei

Konferenztag 1: Gender and Identity

13:30 Uhr

Eröffnung

14:00 Uhr

Wolfram Knauer (Darmstadt, Germany):
Clash of Identities

In seinem einführenden Referat fragt Wolfram Knauer nach musikalischen Klischees, mithilfe derer sich die “Identität” eines Musikers ausdrücken lässt, und überlegt, ob diese sich in der Musik selbst benennen lassen oder ob sie nicht vielleicht eher Teil eines allgemeinen kulturellen Vokabulars seien, das von Musikern, Kritikern und Publikum gleichermaßen verstanden wird und doch analytisch nur schwer fassbar ist. Knauer identifiziert musikalische Zeichen, die dem Hörer Identität suggerieren, und er diskutiert das explizite und das implizite Vokabular, das Jazzmusiker zur Verfügung steht, um Identität musikalisch auszudrücken.

Wolfram Knauer leitet seit 1990 das Jazzinstitut Darmstadt, lehrte daneben an mehreren deutschen Hochschulen und Universitäten. Er hat diverse Bücher veröffentlicht, zuletzt Biographien über Louis Armstrong und Charlie Parker (beide im Reclam-Verlag), ist Herausgeber der Darmstädter Beiträge zur Jazzforschung, sitzt im Herausgebergremium der internationalen Fachzeitschrift Jazz Perspectives und ist Autor etlicher wissenschaftlicher Beiträge in Büchern und Fachzeitschriften. Im Frühjahr 2008 lehrte er als erster nicht-amerikanischer Louis Armstrong Professor of Jazz Studies an der Columbia University in New York.

15:00 Uhr

Mario Dunkel (Dortmund, Germany):
Sexual Desire, Eroticism, and the Construction of the Jazz Tradition

Mario Dunkel stellt fest, dass sich in frühen Schriften zum Jazz vor allem eine männlich-sexistische Sichtweise auf die durchaus vorhandenen erotischen Elemente in dieser Musik fand. Jazzautoren der 1940er und 1950er Jahre leugneten dann im Versuch, den Jazz zu legitimieren, seine erotische Anziehungskraft gleich ganz. Diese Entwicklung habe zu einem weitgehend ent-sexualisierten Verständnis von Jazztradition geführt. Dunkel untersucht, inwiefern die Ent-Erotisierung des Jazz mit Genderkonzepten in Verbindung stand und diskutiert, ob eine Neubetrachtung der Erotik des Jazz dabei helfen könnte, die Position dieser Musik innerhalb der breiten Musikgeschichte des 20sten Jahrhunderts noch klarer zu beschreiben.

Mario Dunkel unterrichtet Musikwissenschaft an der TU Dortmund. Er hat sich 2014 in American Studies mit einer Arbeit über “The Stories of Jazz: Performing America through Its Musical History” promoviert. Seine Artikel und Besprechungen sind in wissenschaftlichen Fachmagazinen wie American Music, Jazz Research News, Musiktheorie, Popular Music and Society und anderen erschienen. Zurzeit beschäftigt er sich mit der Praxis und den Auswirkungen der transnationalen Musikdiplomatie sowie mit der Konzeptualisierung und Aufführung von Musikgeschichte in Europa und den USA.

16:00 Uhr

Katherine Williams (Plymouth, UK):
‘Alright For A Girl’ and Other Jazz Myths

Katherine Williams befasst sich mit den britischen Saxophonistinnen Kathy Stobart und Trish Clowes, und beleuchtet, wie die aus unterschiedlichen Generationen stammenden Instrumentalistinnen jeweils ihren Weg innerhalb der traditionell männlich geprägten Welt dieser Musik gingen. Williams benutzt Beispiele aus Jazzliteratur und eigenen Interviews, um Herausforderungen und Belohnungsmuster in einer durch Vorurteile gegenüber Frauen im Jazz geprägten Szene zu beschreiben und dabei zu einer etwas anderen Darstellung der Rolle der Frau in der Jazzgeschichte zu gelangen.

Katherine Williams unterrichtet an der Musikfakultät der Plymouth University. Ihre wissenschaftlichen Abschlüsse stammen vom King’s College London (BMus(Hons)) und der University of Nottingham (MA, PhD). Ihre Forschungsinteressen gelten dem Jazz, Genderfragen, der populären Musik, der Erforschung digitaler Kulturen, sowie dem Thema Musik und Geographie. Ihre Artikel erschienen beispielsweise in Jazz Perspectives (2013), dem Jazz Research Journal (2013) und dem Journal of Music History Pedagogy. Sie ist Autorin einer Monographie über Rufus Wainwright, die im Frühjahr 2016 bei Equinox erscheinen wird, außerdem Autorin und Mitherausgeberin des Cambridge Companion to the Singer-Songwriter (ebenfalls für 2016 geplant). Katherine spielt Saxophon und tritt im Jazzkontext genauso wie mit klassischer und Neuer Musik auf.

17:00 Uhr

Monika Bloss (Berlin, Germany):
Trouble with Genre and Gender: Female Jazz Musicians and their (Print) Media Representation – Four Examples from Past to Present

Monika Bloss (Berlin) fragt, wie stark das Bild der Frau im Jazz durch die Medien beeinflusst sei. Anhand von Musikerinnen – Hazel Scott, Diana Krall, Maria Baptist und Esperanza Spalding – diskutiert sie, wie deren öffentliche Wahrnehmung durch oft subtile Formen der Diskriminierung in Wort und Bild geprägt sei. Und sie fragt, ob und welchen Sinn es machen könne, als Musikerin in die eigene mediale Darstellung in der Tages- und der Fachpresse einzugreifen.

Monika Bloss befasst sich seit vielen Jahren intensiv mit dem Thema Popmusik und Gender. Sie unterrichtete unter anderem an der Humboldt Universität Berlin sowie an den Universitäten in Potsdam, Bremen, Dresden und Oldenburg. 2010 war hatte sie die Aigner-Rollet Gastprofessur an der Kunstuniversität Graz inne. Bloss kuratierte 2013 die Ausstellung “SHEPOP – Frauen und Mädchen auf den Bühnen populärer Musik” im rock’n’popmuseum Gronau und organisierte eine die Ausstellung begleitende Konferenz zum Thema Gender und populäre Musik.


FREITAG, 2. Oktober 2015
Literaturhaus, Kasinostraße 3
Eintritt frei

9:00 Uhr

Michael Kahr (Graz, Austria):
Chromaticism and Identity in Clare Fischer’s Music

Michael Kahr hat sich in seiner Arbeit intensiv mit der Musik des Pianisten und Komponisten Clare Fischer auseinandergesetzt, dessen individueller Personalstil sich durch eine besondere Art der Stimmführung und Chromatik auszeichnet. Kahr fragt nach den Wechselwirkungen zwischen harmonischen Strukturen, persönlichen Erlebnissen und dem generellen sozio-kulturellen Umfeld und danach, wie die Erkenntnis solcher Wechselwirkungen helfen kann, Fischers musikalische Identität näher zu beschreiben.

Michael Kahr (Dr. Mag.Art., MMus, PhD Sydney) ist Lehrbeauftragter am Institute für Jazz an der Universität für Musik und darstellende Kunst in Graz. Zurzeit arbeitet er am durch die FWF geförderten Projekt Jazz & the City: Identity of a Capital of Jazz, unterrichtet daneben Jazzklavier. Seine Dissertation untersuchte Aspekte von Harmonik und Kontext in der Musik Clare Fischers. Nach einem Forschungsaufenthalt als Fulbright Scholar in Los Angeles organisierte Kahr 2010 das erste internationale Clare Fischer Symposium in Graz. 2011 erhielt er das Morroe Berger / Benny Carter-Stipendium der Rutgers University. Neben seiner Forschung ist Kahr als Jazzpianist, -komponist und –arrangeur aktiv.

10:00 Uhr

Yoko Suzuki (Pittsburgh, PA, USA):
Gendering Musical Sound in Jazz Saxophone Performance

Yoko Suzuki stellt in ihren Recherchen über das Saxophonspiel im Jazz fest, dass Sound, Intonation und die Art der Darbietung in Gesprächen mit vier männlichen und dreißig weiblichen Saxophonist/innen “gegendert” beschrieben werden. Sie fragt, was wohl mit einer maskulinen Art zu spielen gemeint sein könne und was als feminin empfunden wird. Im gesellschaftlichen Kontext, stellt sie fest, würden Gendernormen laufend korrigiert und rekonstruiert, im Jazz aber wirkten sie wie festgeschrieben. Suzuki diskutiert die Auswirkungen von Gendernormen im Jazz und spekuliert darüber, was wohl die zahlreichen Saxophonistinnen jüngster Zeit dazu beitragen könnten, diese Normen zu ändern.

Yoko Suzuki promovierte sich 2011 in den Fächern Musikethnologie und Women’s Studies an der University of Pittsburgh. Zurzeit unterrichtet sie an derselben Universität Jazzgeschichte und leitet das Jazzensemble. Sie tritt als Saxophonistin in Pittsburgh und New York City auf.

11:00 Uhr

Ilona Haberkamp (Fröndenberg, Gemany):
(Jutta) Hipp Style or Adaption?

Ilona Haberkamp blickt auf die zwei Karrieren der Pianistin Jutta Hipp, die im Deutschland der frühen 1950er Jahren als avancierteste Vertreterin ihres Instruments galt – egal ob männlich oder weiblich –, und die ihren Klavierstil im Konkurrenzklima von New York veränderte, wohin sie 1955 übersiedelte. Hipp hatte bereits in ihrer Jugend durch Adaption und Imitation musikalischer Idole zu ihrem Personalstil gefunden, und Haberkamp zeigt im Vergleich von Aufnahmen aus verschiedenen Perioden in Hipps Schaffen, wie sich ihr Klavierstil parallel zu ihren Lebensumständen veränderte.

Ilona Haberkamp studierte Saxophon in Dortmund und Köln und Musikwissenschaft in Münster (M.A.). Sie unterrichtet an der Musikschule Dortmund und der Jazzakademie, leitet verschiedene Jazzensembles und die Big Band, hat eigene musikalische Projekte. Mit ihrem Ilona Haberkamp Quartett war sie 2013 mit ihrem aktuellen Projekt “Cool is Hipp is Cool” auf den Berliner Jazztagen zu hören. Bisherige Forschungsthemen: Jazz in the Soviet-Union, Paul Desmond style, the Art of Jutta Hipp.

12-14 Uhr
Mittagspause

14:00 Uhr

Martin Niederauer (Wien, Austria):
Male Hegemony in Jazz

Martin Niederauer stellt fest, dass das Jazz-Genre von Männern dominiert werde, die Geschlechterverhältnisse im Jazz sich allerdings nicht allein durch die Stereotypisierung von Frauen oder ein Übergewicht an Männern erklären ließe. Man habe es vielmehr mit einem im Jazz spezifischen Bild von Männlichkeit zu tun, das unter den Hörern genauso wie unter den Musikern vorherrsche und bei dem die männlich-männlichen Beziehungen an Relevanz gewinnen. Daher sei nicht so sehr das Ungleichgewicht von Männern und Frauen für den Status Quo der Geschlechterverhältnisse im Jazz verantwortlich als vielmehr die Art der sozialen Beziehungen und Praktiken im Jazz.

Martin Niederauer, Dr. phil., studierte Soziologie in Trier und Frankfurt am Main. Er promovierte in Frankfurt am Main zum Thema “Die Widerständigkeiten des Jazz – Sozialgeschichte und Improvisation unter den Imperativen der Kulturindustrie”. Seit 2013 forscht er am Institut für Musiksoziologie der Universität für Musik und darstellende Kunst Wien über Wissensformen und künstlerische Praktiken in Kompositionsprozessen in der Kunstmusik. Seine weiteren Arbeitsschwerpunkte sind Kritische Theorie, Ästhetik, Jazz und empirische Sozialforschung.

15:00 Uhr

Joy Ellis (London, UK):
Women and the Jazz Jam

Joy Ellis blickt auf die Jam Session als ein Phänomen des Jazzlebens, das wegen seines Wettbewerbscharakters oft als vornehmlich männliche Praxis beschrieben wird. Sie untersucht die Vorurteile, denen Frauen begegnen, wenn sie bei Sessions einsteigen wollen, und sie leitet aus Gesprächen, die sie mit Musikern beiderlei Geschlechts führte, die Frage ab, welchen Einfluss gesellschaftliche Veränderungen unserer Zeit auf die Akzeptanz von Frauen bei Jam Sessions habe.

Joy Ellis ist eine Jazzpianistin, -sängerin und -komponistin und lebt in London. Seit Beginn ihrer musikalischen Karriere im Jahr 2003 ist sie in Großbritannien, Europa, den USA und Südost-Asien aufgetreten. Sie studierte an der Guildhall School of Music and Drama und hat seither mit vielen Künstlern der UK-Musikszene auf der Bühne gestanden, darunter Omar Lye-Fook MBE, Nikki Iles und Anita Wardell. In diesem Jahr wird sie ihr Debütalbum mit dem Titel Life on Land herausbringen. 2012 hat sie beim BASBWE-Festival den Kompositionspreis für ein Stück für Bläserensemble gewonnen. Der renommierte britische Komponist Philip Sparke beschrieb eines ihrer Stücke mit den Worten: “die Arbeit einer Komponistin mit einer ganz eigenen Stimme und der Fähigkeit diese auch auszudrücken.”

16:00 Uhr

Christopher Dennison (New York, NY, USA):
One-Armed Ball Players: The Language of Homosexuality in Jazz

Christopher Dennison (New York City, USA) findet, dass das Klischee von schwulen Männern als feminin sich durch die Jazzgeschichte ziehe und sogar von einzelnen prominenten schwulen Jazzmusikern aufgenommen worden sei. In seinem Referat untersucht Dennison insbesondere die Sprache, mit der Homosexualität im Jazz behandelt wird und beleuchtet dabei all jene problematischen Klischees, die auch in der Jazzwelt allgegenwärtig sind.

Christopher Dennison hat einen Master in Jazz History and Research an der Rutgers University-Newark gemacht. Sein Forschungsinteresse gilt insbesondere dem Zusammenhang zwischen Sprache und Jazz. In seinen Studien hat er sich etwa mit dem Jazzelement in James Joyces Ulysses befasst, aber auch mit dem Einfluss von Oral History auf die Jazzgeschichte, dargestellt an der Entstehung des Bebop und Ira Gitlers Buch Swing to Bop. Dennison arbeitet zurzeit im Team der NPR-Radioshow Jazz Night in America.

17:00 Uhr

Jenna Bailey (Lethbridge, Canada / Sussex, UK):
‘Play Like A Man and Look Like a Woman”: Exploring the Role of Gender in Ivy Benson’s All Girl Band

Jenna Bailey befasst sich mit der britischen Bandleaderin Ivy Benson, die von 1940 bis in die 1980er Jahre hinein eine Frauenkapelle leitete, aus der etliche bedeutende Instrumentalistinnen hervorgehen sollten, unter ihnen beispielsweise Barbara Thompson, Deidre Cartwright oder Annie Whitehead. Bailey hat eine große Zahl ehemaliger Benson-Musikerinnen befragt und dabei erfahren, wie Vorurteile ihre Karriere beeinflussten. Benson selbst, die doch eigentlich eine Anwältin für Musikerinnen war, habe negativen Klischees über Frauen in der Musik am Leben gehalten, wenn sie etwa darauf bestand, dass ihre Musikerinnen zwar “wie Männer spielen”, aber “wie Frauen aussehen”.

Jenna Bailey ist Historikerin und Schriftstellerin. Sie hat an der University of Sussex in Zeitgeschichte promoviert und gehört zurzeit zum Vorstand des Centre for Oral History and Tradition (COHT) an der University of Lethbridge, Kanada. Sie ist außerdem Visiting Research Fellow am Centre for Life History and Life Writing Research (CLHLWR) an der University of Sussex, England. Jenna hat mit dem Buch Can Any Mother Help Me? (Faber) einen Bestseller verfasst und arbeitet zurzeit an ihrem nächsten Buch über Ivy Bensons All Girl Band.

20:30 Uhr
Konzert und Session im Jazzinstitut

Jürgen Wuchner Quartett

Thomas Bachmann (ts) – Uli Partheil (p) – Jürgen Wuchner (b) – Ulli Schiffelholz (d)

 [Das für Freitagabend angekündigte Konzert zum Darmstädter Jazzforum in der Centralstation mit Lynne Arriale, Cécile Verny und Grace Kelly muss leider ausfallen, da die Tournee vom Veranstalter abgesagt wurde.]

Stattdessen spielt am Freitagabend das Jürgen Wuchner Quartett im Gewölbekeller des Jazzinstituts. Nach einem Konzertset ist ab dem zweiten Set eine Jam Session geplant, bei der auch einzelne der Referent/innen des Jazzforums einsteigen werden. Bringt also Instrument/e mit!

Der Eintritt zu dieser Veranstaltung ist frei.

JT_box_purple


SAMSTAG, 3. Oktober 2015
Literaturhaus, Kasinostraße 3
Eintritt frei

9:00 Uhr

Ilka Siedenburg (Münster / Bremen, Gemany):
Bigbandklassen: Ein Weg zur musikalischen Identität jenseits von Geschlechterstereotypen?

Ilka Siedenburg erkennt in der zunehmenden Verbreitung von Bläser- und Bigbandklassen im schulischen Kontext die Möglichkeit für Mädchen und Jungen, erste Erfahrungen im Jazz zu sammeln. Die Tatsache, dass hier eine Musik, die weitgehend maskulin konnotiert ist, in einem eher weiblich konnotierten Rahmen vermittelt werde, bleibe nicht ohne Auswirkungen auf die Geschlechterkonstruktionen innerhalb der Bigbandklasse. Siedenburg berichtet über eine Pilotstudie über “Doing” und “Undoing Gender” in Bigbandklassen, bei der die Selbstwahrnehmung der Kinder und Jugendlichen anhand der Präferenzen und Perspektiven untersucht wird, die sie bezüglich ihrer Musikpraxis entwickeln. [Dieses Referat wird auf Deutsch gehalten.]

Ilka Siedenburg ist Professorin für Musikpädagogik an der Universität Münster. Ihr Studium absolvierte sie in Oldenburg (Lehramt Musik & Deutsch) und Frankfurt am Main (Instrumentalpädagogik Jazz & Popularmusik). 2007 promovierte sie an der Universität Oldenburg. Nach verschiedenen Tätigkeiten als Instrumentalpädagogin, Musikerin und Musiklehrerin war sie von 2010 bis 2014 als Professorin für Didaktik Populärer Musik an der Hochschule Osnabrück in der instrumentalpädagogischen Ausbildung tätig.

10:00 Uhr

Mane Stelzer (Frankfurt am Main, Gemany):
“Für uns war es fremde Musik” – wie junge Instrumentalistinnen zum Jazz finden (oder auch nicht)

Mane Stelzer untersucht die Entscheidungsfindung junger Musikerinnen für ihr Instrument sowie die Hürden, die sie nehmen müssen, wenn sie erste jazz- oder popmusikalische Erfahrungen sammeln. Ausgehend von Interviews, die sie mit jungen Musikerinnen führte, untersucht Stelzer die unterschiedlichen musikalischen Biografien der jungen Instrumentalistinnen und wie es den einen gelang, ihre musikalische Leidenschaft zum Beruf zu machen und den anderen nicht. Einen besonderen Focus legt sie auf die Frage, inwieweit die musikalischen Biografien der jungen Frauen sie befähigen, an einer Hochschule für Jazz-/Popularmusik angenommen zu werden. [Dieses Referat wird auf Deutsch gehalten.]

Mane Stelzer, Ethnologin M.A., ist freie Mitarbeiterin beim Frauen Musik Büro in Frankfurt, das Musikerinnen präsentiert, fördert und vernetzt; dort arbeitet sie vor allem als Redakteurin des Online-Musikjournals MELODIVA und interviewt regelmäßig Musikerinnen zu ihrer Lebens- und Arbeitssituation, Vereinbarkeit von Familie & Beruf, Studium usw. (www.melodiva.de). 2014 hat sie das Online-Nachwuchsportal MELODITA von und für junge Musikerinnen in Kooperation mit der Fachhochschule Frankfurt, Soziale Arbeit/Schwerpunkt Kultur & Medien gestartet (www.melodita.de). Außerdem gibt sie Songwriting-Workshops für Mädchen (Bsp: Adipositas-Präventionsprojekt “Gib Deiner Stimme ein Gewicht” 2006/ Mädchenkulturprojekt Mafalda “Girlz Run The World” 2012) und tritt als Singer-/Songwriterin mit ihren deutsch- und englischsprachigen Songs auf (www.mane-musik.de).

11:00 Uhr

Nicole Johänntgen (Zürich, Switzerland):
Get the flow and go! Music & Business

Nicole Johänntgen berichtet über SOFIA (Support Of Female Improvising Artists) und HELVETIA ROCKT, zwei Initiativen, an denen sie beteiligt ist und die Musikerinnen in einem vor allem von Männern dominierten Arbeitsfeld Unterstützung geben sollen. Johänntgen erklärt den Bedarf solcher Initiativen und die Perspektive für eine regionale, nationale und internationale Vernetzung und Selbstvermarktung. Sie diskutiert außerdem, wie sie und ihre Mitstreiterinnen durch solche Projekte dazu beitragen wollen, gesellschaftliche Stereotype zu verändern und den Mangel an Vorbildern für Musikerinnen zu beheben. [Dieses Referat wird auf Deutsch gehalten.]

Nicole Johänntgen ist eine in Zürich lebende deutsche Saxophonistin / Komponistin. 2013 gründete sie SOFIA – Support Of Female Improvising Artists, ein Pionierprojekt, das improvisierenden Musikerinnen aus Deutschland, der Schweiz und aus Frankreich im komplexen Musikgeschäft der Gegenwart helfen soll.

12-14 Uhr:
Mittagspause

14:00 Uhr

Sherrie Tucker (Lawrence, USA):
A Conundrum is Woman-in-Jazz: Continual Improvisations on the Categorical Exclusions of Being Included

Sherrie Tucker sieht in der Langlebigkeit des Themas “Frauen im Jazz” (als analytische, taktische oder programmatische Kategorie, in Marketing, Rezeption, öffentlichem Diskurs, usw.) zugleich ein Set veränderbarer gender- und geschlechtsspezifischer Parameter, das auf die gesamte Jazzgeschichte anwendbar sei. Sie betrachtet vergleichbare Ansätze (über Gender im Jazz, LGBTQ im Jazz, Sexualität im Jazz usw.) und gibt Beispiele für kreative Wege, wie sich improvisierende Künstler und Wissenschaftler mit dem scheinbar immer noch rätselhaften Thema “Frauen im Jazz” auseinandersetzen können. Außerdem fragt sie, ob es nicht vielleicht bessere Parameter gäbe, mit denen sich gender- oder geschlechtsspezifische Unterschiede in der Jazzpraxis und -forschung beschreiben ließen als die zur Zeit gebräuchlichen wie Inklusion/Exklusion, In/Out, Ausblendung/Überzeichnung, Unsichtbarkeit/Anerkennung.

Sherrie Tucker (Professor, American Studies, University of Kansas) ist die Autorin von Dance Floor Democracy: the Social Geography of Memory at the Hollywood Canteen (Duke, 2014), Swing Shift: “All-Girl” Bands of the 1940s (Duke, 2000) sowie Mitherausgeberin (with Nichole T. Rustin) von Big Ears:  Listening for Gender in Jazz Studies (Duke, 2008). Sie gehört zwei wichtigen Forschungsinitiativen an: International Institute of Critical Improvisation Studies und Improvisation, Community, and Social Practice (für letztere ist sie für die Themen Improvisation, Gender und Körperlichkeit zuständig), die vom Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council in Kanada gefördert werden. Sie gehört zu den Gründungsmitgliedern der Melba Liston Research Collective, gehört dem AUMI (Adaptive Use Musical Instrument) Forschungsteam des Deep Listening Institute an und ist Mitgründerin von AUMI-KU InterArts, einer der sechst Mitgliederinstitute des AUMI Research Consortium. Sie war 2004-2005 Louis Armstrong Visiting Professor am Center for Jazz Studies der Columbia University und gehörte dort auch der Columbia Jazz Study Group an. Zusammen mit Randal M. Jelks gibt sie die Zeitschrift American Studies heraus. Außerdem ist sie eine von drei Herausgeberinnen (zusammen mit Deborah Wong und Jeremy Wallach) der Music/Culture-Buchreihe der Wesleyan University Press.

15:00 Uhr

John Murph (Washington, USA):
Exploring the Queer Overtones of Sun Ra’s Outer Space Ways

John Murph stellt Beispiele vor, in denen der charismatische Pianist, Komponist und Bandleader Sun Ra homoerotische und andere queere Untertöne in sein umfangreiches, schon früh multimediales und ungemein eigenwilliges Schaffen einbrachte, bei dem er Musik, Theater, Film, Dichtung, Tanz und Street Fashion bunt mischte. In einer vergleichenden Analyse stellt Murph Symbole der Schwulenkultur wie Dragqueen-Parties, Disco, überladenen Pomp oder die Neuerfindung und Mythologisierung der eigenen Person Beispielen aus Sun Ras Lyrik und Philosophie gegenüber, seiner Kunst traditionelle Geschlechterrollen infrage zu stellen, und dem Konzept des Andersseins, das insbesondere in seiner Darstellung auf der Bühne oder auch im Film sichtbar wird.

John Murph arbeitet in Washington, DC als Musikjournalist, dessen Artikel etwa in der JazzTimes, im Down Beat, in der Washington Post, in JazzWise, NPR, The Root und AARP erschienen sind. Er hat immer mal wieder über die Künste und die schwule Subkultur geschrieben, beispielsweise in seinem Artikel “Rhapsody in Rainbow: Jazz and the Queer Aesthetic” (JazzTimes, 2010). 2014 moderierte er mehrere Gesprächsrunden beim ersten OutBeat Jazz Festival in Philadelphia.

16:00 Uhr

Christian Broecking (Berlin, Germany):
Authentic lesbian as I am…” Aspects of Gender, Marginalisation and Political Protests in the Life and Work of Irène Schweizer

Christian Broecking beleuchtet die Karriere der Schweizer Pianistin Irène Schweizer, die seit den späten 1960er, frühen 1970er Jahren zu den Inspirationsquellen der europäischen freien Musikszene gehört. Anhand konkreter Beispiele aus seinem aktuellen Biographie-Projekt erklärt Broecking Schweizers Engagement für die feministische Bewegung und die Auswirkungen dieses Engagements auf ihre Kunst, diskutiert außerdem Genderaspekte, die in Interviews mit Kolleg/innen, Familienmitgliedern und Freunden angesprochen wurden.

Christian Broecking, Soziologe und Musikwissenschaftler, kuratierte 2012 und 2013 die internationale Konferenz Transatlantic Dialogue on the Societal Relevance of Music am Heidelberg Center for American Studies. Er hat mehrere Bücher über afro-amerikanische Kultur verfasst (Der Marsalis-Komplex), schreibt für Tageszeitungen und Musikfachzeitschriften und produziert Rundfunkfeatures. Broecking war der Gründungs-Programmdirektor von Jazz Radio Berlin (1994-1998) und Programmleiter beim Sender Klassik Radio in Frankfurt (2000-2003). Broecking sitzt in der Jury zum “Preis der deutschen Schallplattenkritik”. Er hat an den Universitäten Frankfurt, Heidelberg, Basel, Luzern, Osnabrück, Berlin sowie dem Winterthurer Institut für aktuelle Musik (WIAM) unterrichtet. Zurzeit ist er außerdem Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter der Hochschule Luzern. 2004 gründete er den Berliner Broecking Verlag. Zu seinen jüngsten Veröffentlichungen gehört das Buch Gregory Porter: Jazz, Gospel & Soul (2015).

17:00 Uhr

Nicolas Pillai (Birmingham, UK):
Watching Men Play: the Erotics of the Hollywood Jazz Film

Nicolas Pillai findet, dass das Hollywoodkino zumeist dem “männlichen Blick” folge, einem klar heterosexuellen Standpunkt, der den weiblichen Körper verdingliche. Jazzfilme aus Hollywood (z.B. “Young Man With a Horn”, “The Benny Goodman Story”, “Bird”, “Whiplash”) gingen in der Regel einen anderen Weg, erklärt er, indem sie den Mann zum Objekt der Betrachtung und machten. Pillai entdeckt in den Szenen männlicher musikalischer Interaktion ein Netzwerk an Blicken, die den musikalischen Akt in einen dramaturgischen Bezugsrahmen setzen. Nur aus diesem erotischen Kontext heraus, argumentiert Pillai, lässt sich das musikalische Vergnügen in diesen Filmen verstehen, als Zeichen nämlich, die von Nicht-Jazz-Hörern entschlüsselt werden sollen.

Dr Nicolas Pillai ist wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am Jazz Research Centre der Birmingham City University. Sein erstes Buch Jazz as Visual Culture: film, television and the dissonant image wird 2015 im Verlag I. B. Tauris veröffentlicht. Nicolas hält häufige Vorträge im National Jazz Archive (London). 2014 organisierte er die Konferenz New Jazz Conceptions: History, Theory, Practice (University of Warwick), kuratierte außerdem die Filmreihe Jazzprojector im The Vortex Jazz Club (London). Zurzeit unterrichtet Nicolas am Birmingham Conservatoire of Music.

20:00 Uhr
Konzert, Bessunger Knabenschule

Tenors of Kalma

mit Jimi Tenor (sax), Kalle Kalima (g), Joonas Riippa (dr)

TenorsOfKalma rae photo by Maarit KytöharjuDie Tenors of Kalma verbinden Jazz mit elektronischer Popmusik auf eine ganz neue Art und Weise. Hier trifft Sun Ra auf Kraftwerk. 

Jimi Tenor und Kalle Kalima machen bereits seit zehn Jahren gemeinsam Musik; jetzt haben sie ihr neues Trio zusammen mit dem Schlagzeuger Joonas Riippa aus der Taufe gehoben. Jimi Tenor war mit der traditionellen Rolle eines Popkünstlers nie zufrieden. Er mag Hits geschrieben haben wie “Take Me Baby”, aber seine Musik entzog sich immer allen aktuellen Trends. Dabei fühlt er sich vor dem wild gewordenen Publikum wohl, wenn er seine selbst-entworfenen Glitterkostüme und ein wallendes Cape trägt und sein ebenfalls selbst gemachtes Lärminstrument bedient. Kalle Kalima kommt aus Finnland, lebt in Berlin und mischt in seiner Musik alle möglichen Elemente aus Jazz und Rock. Er spielte unter anderem mit Jazzanova, Jason Moran, Jim Black, Greg Cohen, Anthony Braxton, Tony Allen, Leo Wadada Smith, Michael Wertmüller und Marc Ducret. Und natürlich kennt man Kalima durch seine eigenen Bands Klima Kalima und K-18. Joonas Riippa gehört zu den wichtigsten Schlagzeugern Finnlands und arbeitete mir Kollegen wie Mikko Innanen, Verneri Pohjola, Teemu Viinikainen, Seppo Kantonen und Joonatan Rautio.

Karten über www.knabenschule.de

hr2_logo_neu.ai     Logo_BKS_orange     MES_logo_engl


MONTAG, 5. Oktober 2015

20:30 Uhr
Abschlusskonzert in der Romanfabrik Frankfurt/Main

“Playground”

mit Stephanie Wagner (fl), Esther Bächlin (p,voc), Gina Schwarz (b), Lars Binder (dr)

Karten über www.romanfabrik.de


Please find Darmstadt Jazzforum on Facebook    GENDER_IDENTITY

„GENDER_IDENTITY“ ist eine Veranstaltung des Jazzinstituts Darmstadt, eines Kulturinstituts der Wissenschaftsstadt Darmstadt.

Logo_JazzDa_4c          A5_Darmstadt-Logo_rgb-3c

Das 14. Darmstädter Jazzforum wird gefördert vom Kulturfonds Frankfurt Rhein-Main, vom Hessischen Ministerium für Wissenschaft und Kunst und der Jubiläumsstiftung der Sparkasse Darmstadt.

KFFRM_logo_blau        hessisches_min_wiku    JUBI LOGO

hr2 Kultur, JAZZTHETIK und MELODIVA sind Medienpartner des 14. Darmstädter Jazzforums

hr2_logo_neu.ai        JT_box_purple       LogoMelo_orange

Kooperationspartner des 14. Darmstädter Jazzforums sind „Frauen machen Musik e.V.“, das Kulturzentrum Bessunger Knabenschule, WAGGONG Frankfurt e.V., die Centralstation Darmstadt und die Frankfurter Romanfabrik

Logo_BKS_orange     waggong      CS_Entega_pos_2014      romanfabrik[:en]A4_header_jazzforum_2015_0615_2

Conference schedule

(All papers of the 14th Darmstadt Jazzforum – except for the three presentations on the morning of 3 October – will be presented in English.)

FRIDAY, 18 September 2015, 8:30 pm
Opening-Concert at Jazzinstitut

JazzTalk 109 with “Playground”

with Stephanie Wagner (fl), Esther Bächlin (p,voc), Gina Schwarz (b), Lars Binder (dr)

Playground 1The three musicians Stephanie Wagner (fl-Darmstadt), Esther Bächlin (p/voc-Lucerne) and Gina Schwarz (bs-Vienna) met in 2014 while teaching at during a women’s workshop. They found their interplay at the final teachers’ concert so stimulating that they decided to form a new ensemble to be enlarged by other musicians whenever necessary.

The original compositions by the three musicians’ original complement each other: impressionist, colorful harmonies with a tendency towards darker nuances, entwined and filigreed melodies, airy odd-meter rhythms and bulky grooves – the band explores this rich musical playground with delight and develops the musical ideas in dramaturgical arches. Far from any clichés they create an intelligent collective interplay which alternates with sparkling solos and engulfs the listeners into the creative moment: music between freedom and concentration, pluse and breath!

Stephanie Wagner is one of just a few jazz flutists in Germany. She just recorded her second album with her quintet, “Stephanie Wagners Quinsch”; sie also published a textbook for jazz flute (Schott-Verlag). Esther Bächlin has returned to the contemporary jazz idiom with this project after working in improvisation projects across genres in recent years, including her collaboration with Lauren Newton. The Vienna-based bassist Gina Schwarz has just released her album “Jazzista” on Unit Records and toured with the American drummer Jim Black earlier this year. The drummer Lars Binder is well-known in Germany, having performed with Cécile Verny and the quintet L14,16. He supports and enriches the trio in his nuanced and creative approach.


Spontaneous. Female. Genuine

Exhibition at the Gallery of the Jazzinstitut 
September to December 2015

The exhibition Spontaneous. Female. Genuine focuses on four female jazz musicians from different countries, different eras and different stylistic approaches: the American “First Lady of Jazz” Ella Fitzgerald, the German organ virtuoso Barbara Dennerlein, The German-Polish energy saxophonist Angelika Niescier, and the Swiss free jazz pianist Irène Schweizer. The exhibition documents four lives and artistic approaches far from the usual clichés of “female jazz”  – an inviting trip to different scenes of the jazz world shown on photos, in films, covers and posters.

Echibition at the Gallery of the Jazzinstitut from 18 September to 4 December 2015
Opening of the exhibition: Saturday, 19 September 2015
Open MO, TU, TH 10am – 5pm, FR 10am – 2pm


FRIDAY TO SUNDAY 2 – 4 October 2015
Workshop at Waggong, Frankfurt

with Esther Bächlin, Gina Schwarz, Stephanie Wagner

www.waggong.de

waggong       LogoMelo_orange     Logo_JazzDa_4c


THURSDAY, 1 October 2015
Literaturhaus, Kasinostrasse 3
free and open to the public

1:30 pm

Opening remarks

Gender and Identity

2:00 pm

Wolfram Knauer, Darmstadt, Germany:
Clash of Identities

In his introductory paper, Wolfram Knauer asks about the stereotypes of identity. He looks at different criteria denoting musicians’ “identity” and asks in how far they can be found in the music itself or whether perhaps they have become a cultural vocabulary spoken and understood both by musicians, critics and audience while being hard to prove analytically. Knauer categorizes musical features which might represent identity to the listener and reflects both upon the explicit and implicit vocabulary jazz musicians have at their disposal to frame identity.

Wolfram Knauer is a musicologist and the director of the Jazzinstitut Darmstadt since its inception in 1990. He has written and edited more than 14 books on jazz and serves on the board of editors for the scholarly journal Jazz Perspectives. His most recent books are critical biographies of the trumpeter Louis Armstrong (2010) and the saxophonist Charlie Parker (2014). He has taught at several schools and universities and was appointed the first non-American Louis Armstrong Professor of Jazz Studies at the Center for Jazz Studies, Columbia University, New York, for spring 2008.

3:00 pm

Mario Dunkel, Dortmund, Germany:
Sexual Desire, Eroticism, and the Construction of the Jazz Tradition

Mario Dunkel argues that rather than revising the largely masculinist and sexist representations of eroticism in early texts on jazz, jazz writers of the 1940s and 1950s sought to legitimize jazz by entirely denying its erotic appeal. Besides leading to a largely de-eroticized jazz tradition, their de-sexualization of jazz continues to complicate attempts to re-inscribe eroticism into the jazz tradition. Dunkel explores how the de-eroticization of jazz interacted with conceptualizations of gender, and discusses how a reconsideration of jazz’s eroticism can actually help to position jazz within the larger narratives of musical history in the 20th century.

Mario Dunkel is a researcher and instructor in Musicology at TU Dortmund University, Germany. He holds a PhD in American Studies, which he completed in 2014 with a thesis on “The Stories of Jazz: Performing America through Its Musical History”. His articles and reviews have appeared in American Music, Jazz Research News, Musiktheorie, Popular Music and Society and other publications. His current research interests include the practice and repercussions of transnational music diplomacy as well as the conceptualization and performance of music history in Europe and the U.S.

4:00 pm
Katherine Williams, Plymouth, UK:
‘Alright For A Girl’ and Other Jazz Myths

Katherine Williams looks at the British saxophonists Kathy Stobart and Trish Clowes to explore how they, representing different generations in jazz history, negotiated their path through the traditionally male jazz environment. She draws upon existing jazz literature and original interviews to explore the challenges and rewards of their gendered and musical environments, offering a reworked narrative of the female role in jazz history.

Katherine Williams is a Lecturer in Music at Plymouth University. She gained her degrees from King’s College London (BMus(Hons)), and the University of Nottingham (MA, PhD). Her research specialisms are jazz, gender, popular music, digital cultures, and music and geography, and she has published in many of these fields. She has articles in Jazz Perspectives (2013), Jazz Research Journal (2013), and the Journal of Music History Pedagogy. Her first monograph (Rufus Wainwright), is forthcoming with Equinox in spring 2016, and she is editor and contributor to the Cambridge Companion to the Singer-Songwriter (also forthcoming 2016). Katherine is an active saxophonist, and practices in the idioms of jazz, classical and new music.

5:00 pm

Monika Bloss, Berlin, Germany:
Trouble with Genre and Gender: Female Jazz Musicians and their (Print) Media Representation – Four Examples from Past to Present

Monika Bloss asks how the thinking about women in jazz is being shaped by its coverage through the media. She takes the example of four female musicians, Hazel Scott, Diana Krall, Maria Baptist and Esperanza Spalding, and discusses the way their public representation is shaped by subtle forms of discrimination through both words and photos. She also discusses what actions female musicians can take to change the way in which they are being portrayed by the mainstream or the specialized jazz press.

Monika Bloss has published extensively about pop music and gender. She taught at Humboldt Universität Berlin as well as at the universities in Potsdam, Bremen, Dresden and Oldenburg. In 2010, she held the Aigner-Rollet Visiting Professorship at the Institute for Jazz Research of Art University Graz. Bloss curated the exhibition “SHEPOP – Frauen und Mädchen auf den Bühnen populärer Musik” at the rock’n’popmuseum Gronau in 2013 and organized a conference about gender and popular music accompanying that exhibition.


FRIDAY, 2 October 2015
Literaturhaus, Kasinostrasse 3
free and open to the public

9:00 am

Michael Kahr, Graz, Austria:
Chromaticism and Identity in Clare Fischer’s Music

Michael Kahr focuses on the pianist and composer Clare Fischer who has developed a highly individual style characterized by voice-leading and chromaticism. He asks about the interrelations between harmonic structures, personal experiences and general socio-cultural matters and how all of these help to describe indicators of Fischer’s musical identity.

Michael Kahr (Dr. Mag.Art., MMus, PhD Sydney) is senior lecturer at the Institute for Jazz at the University of Music and Performing Arts in Graz/Austria. He conducted the FWF-funded project Jazz & the City: Identity of a Capital of Jazzand teaches jazz piano. His dissertation on aspects of harmony and context in the music of Clare Fischer at the University of Sydney/Australia was funded by an International Endeavour Research Scholarship by the Australian Government. In 2010 Kahr conducted a research project on the music of Clare Fischer in Los Angeles as a Fulbright Scholar and, subsequently, organized the first International Clare Fischer Symposium at the University of Music in Graz with international presenters such as Bill Dobbins and Brent Fischer. In 2011 he was awarded the Morroe Berger – Benny Carter Jazz Research Award by the Rutgers University. In addition to his academic activities he pursues freelance work as a jazz pianist, composer and arranger.

10:00 am

Yoko Suzuki, Pittsburgh, PA, USA:
Gendering Musical Sound in Jazz Saxophone Performance

Yoko Suzuki focuses on jazz saxophone performance, examining how the instrument’s sound, intonation, and performance style are “gendered” in the narrative of her informants, four male and thirty female saxophonists. She asks what exactly is being associated with a masculine performance and what is being perceived as feminine. She suggests that while gender norms in general are constantly challenged and reconstructed, in jazz they seem to be rather stable. She discusses the effect of such gender norms in jazz and how the emergence of female jazz saxophonists in recent years could change them.

Yoko Suzuki earned a Ph.D. in ethnomusicology and a Ph.D. certificate in women’s studies at the University of Pittsburgh in 2011. Currently, she teaches jazz history and jazz ensemble at the University of Pittsburgh. She is also an active jazz saxophonist performing in Pittsburgh and New York City.

11:00 am

Ilona Haberkamp, Cologne, Germany:
(Jutta) Hipp Style or Adaption?

Ilona Haberkamp looks at the two musical careers of the German pianist Jutta Hipp, who was considered the most advanced pianist in Germany, male or female, in the early 1950s, and changed her piano style after moving to the United States in 1955 due to the competitive environment in New York. Hipp had developed her personal style through the adaption and imitation of musical role models, and Haberkamp shows by comparing recordings from different periods of Hipp’s career that once her life situation changed, so did her piano style.

Ilona Haberkamp studied saxophone in Dortmund and Köln as well as musicology in Münster (M.A.). She teaches at the Dortmund music school and the Jazzakademie, where she heads several jazz ensembles and the big band, but performs with her own musical projects as well. Her current band, Ilona Haberkamp Quartett, played at the Berlin Jazzfest in 2013 performing her “Cool is Hipp is Cool” project. He has been researching jazz in the Soviet Union, the musical style of Paul Desmond, and the art of Jutta Hipp.

12:00 – 2:00 pm
lunch break

2:00 pm

Martin Niederauer, Vienna, Austria:
Male Hegemony in Jazz

Martin Niederauer sees the genre of jazz being dominated by men. However, gender relations in jazz, he argues, cannot be explained merely on account of stereotyping of women or the preponderance of men; it is rather due to a jazz-specific production of masculinity prevailing both among recipients and musicians, in which male-to-male relations in jazz become increasingly important. As a result, it is less a case of the percentage ratio of men and women, but rather the social relations and practices in jazz which pave the way for the prevailing gender relations and through which they are manifested.

Martin Niederauer, Dr. phil, studied Sociology in Trier and Frankfurt am Main. He wrote his doctoral thesis on “Die Widerständigkeiten des Jazz – Sozialgeschichte und Improvisation unter den Imperativen der Kulturindustrie” (“Jazz as social criticism and aesthetic resistance”). Since 2013 he works in a research project at the Institute for Music Sociology at the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna on the relation between knowledge and artistic practices in art music composing. His further research interests are critical theory, aesthetics, jazz, and empirical social research.

3:00 pm

Joy Ellis, London, UK:
Women and the Jazz Jam

Joy Ellis looks at the jam session as a specific jazz practice which due to its competitiveness seems to have often been considered a predominantly masculine one. She examines prejudices which female musicians might encounter sitting in and, referring to interviews with musicians, both male and female, asks in how far general social changes in today’s culture have influenced the acceptance of women playing at jam sessions.

Joy Ellis is a jazz pianist, vocalist and composer based in London. Since appearing on the music scene in 2003 she has performed in the UK, Europe, the USA and Southeast Asia. She achieved a Masters in Jazz Performance at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, graduating in July 2008. Since then Joy has performed with an array of well-established artists on the UK music scene including Omar Lye-Fook MBE, Nikki Iles and Anita Wardell. This year she is looking forward to the release of her debut jazz album entitled “Life On Land”. Joy has a growing portfolio of work as a composer, arranger and orchestrator. In 2012, she was the winner of the BASBWE festival for an original composition for concert wind band due for publication this year. Renowned UK composer Philip Sparke described one of her pieces as “the work of a composer with an original voice and the means to express it.”

4:00 pm

Christopher Dennison, New York, NY, USA:
One-Armed Ball Players: The Language of Homosexuality in Jazz

Christopher Dennison finds that stereotypes of gay men as effeminate have been present throughout jazz history, and that some of these stereotypes have become so central to jazz’s treatment of homosexuality that even prominent gay musicians seem to believe them. In his paper Dennison examines the language used in discussions of homosexuality in jazz, focusing on the problematic stereotype that is deeply ingrained in jazz culture.

Christopher Dennison has an MA in Jazz History and Research from Rutgers University-Newark. His research interests include language and discussions of jazz. His undergraduate thesis deals with elements of jazz in James Joyce’s Ulysses, and his 2015 master’s thesis focuses on the role of oral history in the construction of the bebop story, specifically through Ira Gitler’s Swing to Bop. Christopher currently works on the NPR program Jazz Night in America.

5:00 pm

Jenna Bailey, Lethbridge, Canada / Sussex, UK:
‘Play Like A Man and Look Like a Woman”: Exploring the Role of Gender in Ivy Benson’s All Girl Band

Jenna Bailey looks at the British bandleader Ivy Benson who managed to keep an all-girl band working from 1940 into the 1980s, a band which would be the starting point for well-known British female instrumentalists such as Barbara Thompson, Deidre Cartwright and Annie Whitehead. Drawing upon interviews with Benson band members, Bailey explores the ways in which gender assumptions influenced the working lives of these women and how, despite being an advocate for female musicians, Ivy herself reinforced long held negative gender stereotypes about women and music by insisting her musicians “play like men” and “look like women”.

Jenna Bailey is an historian and a writer. She has her PhD in Contemporary History from the University of Sussex and is currently an Executive Member of the Centre for Oral History and Tradition (COHT) at the University of Lethbridge, Canada and the Visiting Research Fellow for the Centre for Life History and Life Writing Research (CLHLWR) at the University of Sussex, England. Jenna is the author of the best-selling book Can Any Mother Help Me? (Faber) and is currently working on her next book about Ivy Benson’s All Girl Band.

20:30 Uhr
Conzert and session at the Jazzinstitut

Jürgen Wuchner Quartet

Thomas Bachmann (ts) – Uli Partheil (p) – Jürgen Wuchner (b) – Ulli Schiffelholz (d)

[The concert originally planned for Friday, featuring Lynne Arriale, Cécile Verny and Grace Kelly, has been canceled.]

Insetad we invited the Jürgen Wuchner Quartett to play at the Jazzinstitut’s concert space. After the first set the stage will be open to sit in at a jam session at which we expect a number of conference speakers to join the band. Bring your instrument/s!

This concert / session is free and open to the public.

JT_box_purple


SATURDAY, 3 October 2015
Literaturhaus, Kasinostrasse 3
free and open to the public

9:00 am

Ilka Siedenburg, Münster/Bremen, Germany:
Bigbandklassen: Ein Weg zur musikalischen Identität jenseits von Geschlechterstereotypen?

Ilka Siedenburg looks into the increasing formation of big bands in school education, a typically male-connoted activity (playing jazz) in a typically female-connoted field of action (music class), and the effect of this development on the gender self-image of participating boys and girls. She reports about a pilot study on “doing and undoing gender” in big band classes which tries to identify the gender perception of children and adolescents through their musical preferences and perspectives. [This presentation will be held in German]

Ilka Siedenburg is a professor of music education at the university of Muenster, Germany. After her studies in music education at the University of Oldenburg and the Conservatory of Frankfurt, she worked as a musician and as a teacher in different fields of music education and was a professor of didactics of popular music at the University of Applied Sciences in Osnabrueck. She received a PhD from the university of Oldenburg.

10:00 am

Mane Stelzer, Frankfurt, Germany:
“Für uns war es fremde Musik” – wie junge Instrumentalistinnen zum Jazz finden (oder auch nicht)

Mane Stelzer explores the decision-making process of girls when it comes to taking up instruments, as well as the obstacles they meet trying to collect their first experiences either in pop or jazz bands. Based on interviews with young female musicians, Stelzer explores the divergent musical biographies of young female instrumentalists ad asks how some of them succeed in making a profession out of their passion and others don’t. She also asks which aspects of their musical biography qualifies these young women to be accepted at jazz and pop departments of German Musikhochschulen (conservatories). [This presentation will be held in German]

Mane Stelzer is an ethnologist and a freelance editor for the online journal MELODICA issued by Frauen Musik Büro in Frankfurt, Germany, an organization representing, supporting and connecting female musicians. Her focus are interviews with female musicians about their living and working conditions, about the compatibility of family and work or study etc. In 2014 she melodita.de in cooperation with the University of Applied Sciences, a website by and for young female musicians. She teaches at songwriting workshops for girls and performs as a singer/songwriter (www.mane-musik.de).

11:00 am

Nicole Johänntgen, Zurich, Switzerland:
Get the flow and go! Music & Business

Nicole Johänntgen reports about two initiatives she is involved in, SOFIA (Support Of Female Improvising Artists) and HELVETIA ROCKT, both of which try to help female musicians in an environment which is mostly dominated by male decision-makers. Johänntgen explains the need for such initiatives and the outlook for regional, national and international networking and self-marketing, by all of which she and her colleagues aim to change the existing social stereotypes as well as the lack of female role models in the field of jazz and rock. [This presentation will be held in German]

Nicole Johänntgen is a German saxophonist / composer, currently living in Zürich, Switzerland. In 2013 she founded the project SOFIA – Support Of Female Improvising Artists. The pioniering project helps female improvising musicians in today’s difficult music business.

12:00 – 2:00 pm:
lunch break

2:00 pm

Sherrie Tucker, Lawrence, KS, USA:
A Conundrum is Woman-in-Jazz: Continual Improvisations on the Categorical Exclusions of Being Included

Sherrie Tucker reflects about the longevity of the “women in jazz” category (analytic, tactical, programmatic, marketing, reception, gatekeeping, advocating, etc.) as a shifting set of gendered and sexed parameters that appear to span the gamut of jazz history. She looks at different approaches towards this and related subjects (Gender in Jazz, LGBTQ in Jazz, Sexuality in Jazz etc.), highlights some of the creative ways in which improvising artists and scholars have worked with and against the conundrum “women in jazz”, and asks what it might take to compose more innovative parameters for gender and sex difference in jazz practice and study than inclusion/exclusion, in/out, omission/addition, invisibility/recognition.

Sherrie Tucker (Professor, American Studies, University of Kansas) is the author of Dance Floor Democracy: the Social Geography of Memory at the Hollywood Canteen (Duke, 2014), Swing Shift: “All-Girl” Bands of the 1940s (Duke, 2000) and co-editor, with Nichole T. Rustin, of Big Ears:  Listening for Gender in Jazz Studies (Duke, 2008). She is a member of two major collaborative research initiatives: International Institute of Critical Improvisation Studies and Improvisation, Community, and Social Practice (for which she served as facilitator for the Improvisation, Gender, and the Body research area) both funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. She is a founding member of the Melba Liston Research Collective, a member of the AUMI (Adaptive Use Musical Instrument) research team of the Deep Listening Institute, and founding member of AUMI-KU InterArts, one of six member institutions of the AUMI Research Consortium. She was the Louis Armstrong Visiting Professor at the Center for Jazz Studies at Columbia University in 2004-2005, where she was a member of the Columbia Jazz Study Group. With Randal M. Jelks, she co-edits the journal American Studies. She is one of three Series Editors, along with Deborah Wong and Jeremy Wallach, of the Music/Culture Series at Wesleyan University Press.

3:00 pm

John Murph, Washington, D.C., USA:
Exploring the Queer Overtones of Sun Ra’s Outer Space Ways

John Murph discusses examples in which the charismatic pianist, composer and bandleader Sun Ra incorporated homoeroticism and other gay overtones through his expansive multi-disciplinary, idiosyncratic artistic realm, which incorporated music, theatre, film, poetry, dance and street fashion. In a comparative analysis he touches upon iconic gay culture touchstones as drag-queen balls, disco, pageantry, self-invention and self-mythologies as well as some of Sun Ra’s lyrics, philosophies, the art of challenging traditional gender, the concept of otherness, and the visual representations through concert and films.

John Murph is a Washington, DC-based music journalist, whose written have been published by JazzTimes, Down Beat, The Washington Post, JazzWise, NPR, The Root and AARP. He was written several articles related to the arts and gay culture, mostly notably JazzTimes’ 2010 article, “Rhapsody in Rainbow: Jazz and the Queer Aesthetic.” He was also a panelist at Philadelphia’s first annual OutBeat Jazz Festival in 2014.

4:00 pm

Christian Broecking, Berlin, Germany:
Authentic lesbian as I am…” Aspects of Gender, Marginalisation and Political Protests in the Life and Work of Irène Schweizer

Christian Broecking looks at the career of the Swiss pianist Irène Schweizer, an important source of inspiration on the European free music scene since the late 1960s, early 1970s. Drawing upon his ongoing biography project about Schweizer, Broecking reflects about the pianist’s commitment to feminist issues and its impact on her art, and he discusses aspects of gender coming up in interviews with fellow musicians, family and friends.

Dr. Christian Broecking, sociologist and musicologist, curated the international conferences “Transatlantic Dialogue on the Societal Relevance of Music” (Heidelberg Center for American Studies, 2012 and 2013). He is the author of several books on African American culture (“Der Marsalis-Komplex”) and writes for newspapers as well as for music journals, he also produces radio features. Christian Broecking was the founding program director of Jazz Radio Berlin (1994–1998) and program director of Klassik Radio in Frankfurt (2000-2003). Broecking is a juror at the “Preis der deutschen Schallplattenkritik” and NPR (National Public Radio). He has lectured at the universities of Frankfurt, Heidelberg, Basel, Luzern, Osnabrück and Berlin as well as at the Winterthurer Institut für aktuelle Musik (WIAM). Currently he is a Senior Research Associate at Hochschule Luzern. In 2004 he founded the Berlin based Broecking Publishing House. Among his recent book publicatons: “Gregory Porter: Jazz, Gospel & Soul” (2015).

5:00 pm

Nicolas Pillai, Birmingham, UK:
Watching Men Play: the Erotics of the Hollywood Jazz Film

Nicolas Pillai argues that while Hollywood cinema was structured around a “male gaze” assuming a heterosexual male point-of-view which objectified the female body, Hollywood jazz films like “Young Man With a Horn”, “The Benny Goodman Story”, “Bird” or “Whiplash” problematized this conception, making the male performing body the object of scrutiny and desire. Pillai suggests that the homosocial scenes of male musical interaction constructs a network of gazes – some mutual, some yearning, some unacknowledged, some hidden – which dramatize musical achievement. It is only in this erotic context, Pillai argues, that musical pleasure can be understood in these films, as texts designed to be consumed by non-jazz listeners.

Dr Nicolas Pillai is a researcher in the Jazz Research Centre at Birmingham City University. His first book Jazz as Visual Culture: film, television and the dissonant image will be published by I. B. Tauris in 2016. Nicolas is a frequent speaker at the National Jazz Archive (London) and in 2014 he organised the New Jazz Conceptions: History, Theory, Practice conference (University of Warwick) and curated the Jazzprojector film season at The Vortex Jazz Club (London). Nicolas currently teaches at the Birmingham Conservatoire of Music.

8:00 pm
Konzert, Bessunger Knabenschule

Tenors of Kalma

with Jimi Tenor (sax), Kalle Kalima (g), Joonas Riippa (dr)

TenorsOfKalma rae photo by Maarit KytöharjuTenors of Kalma combines jazz with electronic pop music in a new way. Sun Ra meets Kraftwerk here.

Jimi Tenor and Kalle Kalima have made music together for ten years and now they are breaking ground in a new trio with Joonas Riippa on drums. Jimi Tenor has never settled for the traditional role of a pop artist. He is known as a musician whose work lies beyond current trends although he has also written hits like “Take me Baby”. He is at home in front of the crowd gone wild, wearing a glittering self-­designed costume and a flowing cape, holding a self made noise-producing device. Kalle Kalima is a Berlin-based Finnish jazz guitarist who mixes elements of jazz and rock in a unique way. He has played a.o. with Jazzanova, Jason Moran, Jim Black, Greg Cohen, Anthony Braxton, Tony Allen, Leo Wadada Smith, Michael Wertmüller and Marc Ducret. Kalima is also known of his bands Klima Kalima and K-18. Joonas Riippa is one of the most important drummers in Finland today working with renowned musicians like Mikko Innanen, Verneri Pohjola, Teemu Viinikainen, Seppo Kantonen and Joonatan Rautio.

Tickets: www.knabenschule.de

hr2_logo_neu.ai     Logo_BKS_orange     MES_logo_engl


MONDAY, 5 Oktober 2015, 8:30 pm
Closing-concert at the Romanfabrik Frankfurt/Main

“Playground”

with Stephanie Wagner (fl), Esther Bächlin (p,voc), Gina Schwarz (b), Lars Binder (dr)

Tickets: www.romanfabrik.de


Please find the Darmstadt Jazzforum on Facebook    GENDER_IDENTITY

„GENDER_IDENTITY“ is hosted by the Jazzinstitut Darmstadt, a cultural institution of the City of Science Darmstadt.

Logo_JazzDa_4c          A5_Darmstadt-Logo_rgb-3c

The 14. Darmstädter Jazzforum is fonded by the Kulturfonds Frankfurt Rhein-Main, the  Hessischen Ministerium für Wissenschaft und Kunst and the jubilee-foundation of the Sparkasse Darmstadt.

KFFRM_logo_blau        hessisches_min_wiku     JUBI LOGO

hr2 Kultur, JAZZTHETIK and MELODIVA are media partners of the 14. Darmstädter Jazzforums

hr2_logo_neu.ai        JT_box_purple       LogoMelo_orange

We are co-operating for the 14. Darmstädter Jazzforums with the „Frauen machen Musik e.V.“, the Kulturzentrum Bessunger Knabenschule, WAGGONG Frankfurt e.V., the Centralstation Darmstadt and the Romanfabrik in Frankfurt/Main

Logo_BKS_orange     waggong      CS_Entega_pos_2014      romanfabrik[:]

en_USEnglish